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Sixth grade Science students blogging from the Pacific Northwest in Chimacum, WA!
Mr. G's Blog
Mr. G's Science Facebook Page


by jazzw teacher: Alfonso Gonzalez

Article posted June 2, 2014 at 05:28 PM GMT • comment • Reads 187

We did an experiment to see whether snails prefer moist or dry environments.



The question: do snails prefer moist or dry environments.



Conclusion: The snails preferred moist environments.



Evidence: The snails all went to the moist side repeatedly.



Reasoning: Since the snails went to that side more, the prefer it.

Article posted June 2, 2014 at 05:28 PM GMT • comment • Reads 187



Article posted March 12, 2014 at 05:12 PM GMT • comment • Reads 127

What is the octet rule?



The octet rule is that there are layers of electrons. The first one has two, and the second one, and third on etc. wants eight. If it doesn't have eight it will for bonds to get or give to make eight.



an Ion is a atom that is either positively or negatively charged.

Article posted March 12, 2014 at 05:12 PM GMT • comment • Reads 127



Article posted March 10, 2014 at 05:28 PM GMT • comment • Reads 577

Article posted March 10, 2014 at 05:28 PM GMT • comment • Reads 577



Article posted February 26, 2014 at 05:09 PM GMT • comment • Reads 871

Two students were having a discussion.



One said,

"All cells are living things. Every cell in an Elodea plant is an organism, just like the one-celled paramecium we looked at."



The second student said,

"Well, you’re partly right. I agree that all cells are living things, but an

Elodea cell cannot be called an organism. The Elodea cells can’t live on their own like the paramecia can."



I agree with both, All cells are living things, but by itself an Elodea cell cant live on its own.



Elodia is a small plant.

Paramecia are single celled organisms.

Article posted February 26, 2014 at 05:09 PM GMT • comment • Reads 871



Article posted February 25, 2014 at 05:31 PM GMT • comment • Reads 639

How does the structure of a cell membrane make it so that it can perform its functions?



It keeps things it doesn't want out and lets things it wants in by preventing anything coming through except for gates which only allow specific things too.



How does the structure of DNA make it so that it can do its job, which is to make you into, well, you?



It allows it to be read, and copied so everything has instructions, because it can be split into two and the joined backed together.



How does the shape (form or strucure) of the endoplasmic reticulum make it so that it can synthesize proteins?



It has lots of surface area for ribosomes, and lots of room to have different things come and go.



What did you learn about the phospholipid layer and how it works?



It is made of phospholipids which are little spheres with two tails and the tails repel water so they form a a wall that keeps out water when there are a bunch of them



What did you learn about why DNA has a spiral shape?



It has a spiral shape for several reasons. However they are kind of hard to explain, so I linked this website

[LINK]

so that you can find out for yourself.

Article posted February 25, 2014 at 05:31 PM GMT • comment • Reads 639



Article posted February 11, 2014 at 05:29 PM GMT • comment • Reads 546

Why is Carbon the building block of life on Earth?



Because it easily can create compounds and molecules which are stable, but can react.



What is the difference between an atom and an element?



An element is one of 92 natural (more created in labs) kinds of atoms, which are building blocks of matter.



What is the difference between a molecule and a compound?



a molecule consists of two or more atoms stuck together, a compound is several different kinds of elements chemically bonded.

Article posted February 11, 2014 at 05:29 PM GMT • comment • Reads 546



Article posted January 31, 2014 at 05:24 PM GMT • comment • Reads 228





How Scientists Classify things



[LINK]



How scientists name living things (activity)



[LINK]



How did you organize the living things you found?



I organized them by putting them into plants and cnimals, and mammals and reptiles, and then put them into categories by comparing them to real life plants and animals.



What did the living things in your different groups have in common?



Type of food they eat, how they get energy, shape, size, color, etc.



How did your classification differ from scientists' classification?



It didn't really, they just named things better,



How did you come up with names for living things that didn't have names?



I named it based on where it was or what it looked like.



How do scientists name living things in the real world?



By putting the name of the group of closely related animals first, then use a defining feature or the name of the person who discovered it.





Vocabulary:





Subclass - a smaller group in a group.



Kingdom - an organization of living things, for example fungi, or animals.



Phylum, groups of organisms that have the same body plan, i.e organisms that have backbones.



Class, a ubgroup of phylum, i.e mammals,



Order, Subclass of Class, i.e Carnivores



Family, Subclass of Order, a group of similar animals.



Genus, Subclass of Family, meaning "descent, family, type, gender" in latin. i.e Canis, or the Genus for dogs



Species, one group of organisms that are all the same physically.



taxonomy, The science of classifying and naming living things.



binomial nomenclature - A system for naming using two names.

Article posted January 31, 2014 at 05:24 PM GMT • comment • Reads 228



Article posted January 14, 2014 at 05:13 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 888

Article posted January 14, 2014 at 05:13 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 888



Article posted January 14, 2014 at 05:11 PM GMT • comment • Reads 794

Article posted January 14, 2014 at 05:11 PM GMT • comment • Reads 794



Article posted December 6, 2013 at 05:02 PM GMT • comment (2) • Reads 163

What have you learned about our compound microscopes and how to use them?



I learned that twisting one wheel makes it comr closer and farther.



How does increasing the magnification affect the field of view?



It makes it zoom in or out



What is focal plane and how can you use it to view microorganisms?



It is the platform where you put a slide and you can use it to view different levels of what you are viewing.

Article posted December 6, 2013 at 05:02 PM GMT • comment (2) • Reads 163



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