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We have three 6th grade Science classes and two 8th grade Science classes blogging here from the Pacific Northwest in Chimacum, WA! Sixth graders are learning a bit about Mt Saint Helens, environmental science through fresh water ecology, and physical science this year. Eighth graders are learning about life science this year. Please join us as we learn Science by exploring our world.
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teacher: Alfonso Gonzalez

Blog Entries

Article posted June 11, 2012 at 05:03 PM GMT • comment • Reads 75

For our cockroach experiments we tested navigation and common sense. Our claim was that the cockroach would be able to navigate through the maze to find their own food. We were correct because all the times tested the cockroach had a couple times of error but eventually made it through the maze to the lettuce. We don't really have much for evidence but all the times we started over the maze the roach made it to the end. so there fore cockroaches can maneuver mazes easily with only slight error.

Article posted June 11, 2012 at 05:03 PM GMT • comment • Reads 75



Article posted June 11, 2012 at 04:52 PM GMT • comment • Reads 41

For those of you who dont know Anthropomorphism means to ascribe human attributes to a plant or animal. So pretty much to personify something.

We were asked about our snail and roach experiments and how we personified them through our experiments.

With our snail experiments we did selective choice in taste and sight. they got to choose which foods they wanted,like people do.

For our roaches we did navigation and common sense by placing it in a maze and seeing how long it took it to maneuver through it. Which shows human common sense.

Article posted June 11, 2012 at 04:52 PM GMT • comment • Reads 41



Article posted June 5, 2012 at 05:28 PM GMT • comment • Reads 34

The Madagascar hissing cockroach or Gromphadorhina Portentosa is one of the largest species of cockroach growing up to 5-7.5 inches by maturity. They can be found in the wild in rotting logs on the island of Madagascar off the African coast. These roaches are wingless unlike the others and have the ability to climb smooth glass. You can distinguish males from females by their antennae which is bushier on males, males also have horns on their pronotum. In captivity they live roughly 5 years and enjoy veggies and high protein pellets like dog food. The hissing sound is produced by their ability to force gas through their breathing pores.They only hiss when disturbed,fighting,or attracting females.

These roaches have been used in several t.v. shows including americas next top model where the ladies walked decorated roaches on leashes down a runway.

Article posted June 5, 2012 at 05:28 PM GMT • comment • Reads 34



Article posted May 30, 2012 at 05:06 PM GMT • comment • Reads 41

Article posted May 30, 2012 at 05:06 PM GMT • comment • Reads 41



Article posted May 29, 2012 at 05:06 PM GMT • comment • Reads 34

I know that cockroaches like eating veggies and fruit, they like to invade messy kitchens and are difficult to rid yourself of.

They can survive nuclear war missiles and having their head chopped off.



I want to know how the can survive in such terrible conditions and why they enjoy eating those certain foods. Maybe even how long they have existed on this earth.

Article posted May 29, 2012 at 05:06 PM GMT • comment • Reads 34



Article posted May 29, 2012 at 05:02 PM GMT • comment • Reads 40

I went on the 8th grade odyssey trip and had a great time learning about the ins and outs of our backyard.

I don't really have a favorite destination but I really liked salt creek because of all the amazing picture oppurtunitys, the 9 mile hike was the hardest thing and I had terribl leg pain for several days. But it was worth seeing everything and cleaning up tsunami wreckage off of the beach. I overall loved odyssey and it was a great learning experience.

Article posted May 29, 2012 at 05:02 PM GMT • comment • Reads 40



Article posted May 10, 2012 at 05:17 PM GMT • comment • Reads 45

Our experiment is to see what foods snails like bets out of strawberrys,lettuce,tomato,and carrot. We got this idea from mr.g pretty much.

Article posted May 10, 2012 at 05:17 PM GMT • comment • Reads 45



Article posted May 10, 2012 at 05:15 PM GMT • comment • Reads 41

Snails like soft fleshy fruits and softer veggies but they dont like hard to eat foods like carrots. This is mostly because they are veggies that they cannot access due to them being underground. My evidence is that when put into food choosing trials the snails went for the fleshier foods like strawberrys or soft veggies like lettuce in trials of these sorts they almost ALWAYS chose lettuce or strawberrys. Because of this we reason that if you plant theses kind of food you are almost certain to attract snails. Which is good you think their cute but bad if you don't want half eaten lettuce.

Our inaacuracy is that we didn't really have much time to experiment, we tried to give the snails a natural environment and they ended up eating the grass in the tub, and I don't feel like I thought through our experiment enough.

Article posted May 10, 2012 at 05:15 PM GMT • comment • Reads 41



Article posted May 1, 2012 at 04:55 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 35

The few things I know about snails is that the 'slime' is mucus, their eyes are also retractable. They have hundreds of tiny teeth used to much through grass and others plants. Good thing they are herbivores. I also know that snails like to hibernate during colder times like bears do.



I want to know about the different types of food they enjoy and how long they might live in a closed environment.

Article posted May 1, 2012 at 04:55 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 35



Article posted April 17, 2012 at 05:11 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 46

We learned that you can grow Radishes in a bag that will be ready to transplant in as little as two weeks, we also learned that we had a water cycle going and about how greenhouses work.

Our claim is that you can grow radishes just as easily in a bag as you can in soil.

The evidence wew have are a 12 day series of pictures drawn so we could look back and observe the plants growth. We also had evidence of the live plants but they died because they got forgotten.

Our easoning is that our seeds grew just as well in the time allotted as they would have grown in soil and would have produced radishes in as much as 2 months probably less.

I also researched the water cycle so we could see how the water was moving in the bag.



Bibliography: Glencoe science Life science text book published by McGraw company's



And the Merium Webster college dictionary.



Article posted April 17, 2012 at 05:11 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 46



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