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We have three 6th grade Science classes and two 8th grade Science classes blogging here from the Pacific Northwest in Chimacum, WA! Sixth graders are learning a bit about Mt Saint Helens, environmental science through fresh water ecology, and physical science this year. Eighth graders are learning about life science this year. Please join us as we learn Science by exploring our world.
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Article posted February 25, 2014 at 09:33 AM GMT-7 • comment • Reads 74639

Standards:



MS-LS1-1. Conduct an investigation to provide evidence that living things are made of cells; either one cell or many different numbers and types of cells. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on developing evidence that living things are made of cells, distinguishing between living and non-living things, and understanding that living things may be made of one cell or many and varied cells.]



MS-LS1-2. Develop and use a model to describe the function of a cell as a whole and ways parts of cells contribute to the function. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on the cell functioning as a whole system and the primary role of identified parts of the cell, specifically the nucleus, chloroplasts, mitochondria, cell membrane, and cell wall.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment of organelle structure/function relationships is limited to the cell wall and cell membrane. Assessment of the function of the other organelles is limited to their relationship to the whole cell. Assessment does not include the biochemical function of cells or cell parts.]



Systems and System Models

Systems may interact with other systems; they may have sub-systems and be a part of larger complex systems. (MS-LS1-3)



Structure and Function

Complex and microscopic structures and systems can be visualized, modeled, and used to describe how their function depends on the relationships among its parts, therefore complex natural structures/systems can be analyzed to determine how they function. (MS-LS1-2)



Learning Target 1:

Students will come up with a list of criteria or characteristics that can be used to determine whether an object is living or non-living.



Success Criteria 1:

The list of criteria or characteristics can be applied to all living things.



Learning Target 2:

Identify living things according to their structures and the functions they perform.



Success Criteria 2:

Classify living things, plants and animals, and compare their classifications to biological classification (taxonomy). Give examples of the taxonomic classification of living things and use their genus and species as the Scientific Name (binomial nomenclature).



Learning Target 3:

Students will be able to explain how structure informs function.



Success Criteria 3:

Correctly give examples of different living things and how their structures determine their functions (can be cellular or body part structures).



Learning Target 4:

Students can describe how a cell is the basic unit of living things and describe how cells function.



Success Criteria 4:

Students show understanding of what a cell is and how cells function. At a basic level of understanding students can describe what certain organelles, such as nucleus, mitochondria, chloroplasts, and vacuoles, do. To meet standard students can describe how the structure of DNA makes it able to copy itself and make everything the cell needs, including proteins and enzymes, and/or how the structure of the endoplasmic reticulum allows it to synthesize proteins OR how the structure of the cell membrane makes it able to perform its functions, specifically letting only certain things in and out of the cell.

Article posted February 25, 2014 at 09:33 AM GMT-7 • comment • Reads 74639



Article posted February 25, 2014 at 09:30 AM GMT-7 • comment • Reads 37

Standards:



MS-PS3-4. Plan an investigation to determine the relationships among the energy transferred, the type of matter, the mass, and the change in the average kinetic energy of the particles as measured by the temperature of the sample. [Clarification Statement: Examples of experiments could include comparing final water temperatures after different masses of ice melted in the same volume of water with the same initial temperature, the temperature change of samples of different materials with the same mass as they cool or heat in the environment, or the same material with different masses when a specific amount of energy is added.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment does not include calculating the total amount of thermal energy transferred.]



PS3.A: Definitions of Energy

Motion energy is properly called kinetic energy; it is proportional to the mass of the moving object and grows with the square of its speed. (MS-PS3-1)



PS3.B: Conservation of Energy and Energy Transfer

When the motion energy of an object changes, there is inevitably some other change in energy at the same time. (MS-PS3-5)



PS3.C: Relationship Between Energy and Forces

When two objects interact, each one exerts a force on the other that can cause energy to be transferred to or from the object. (MS-PS3-2)



Systems and System Models

Models can be used to represent systems and their interactions – such as inputs, processes, and outputs – and energy and matter flows within systems. (MS-PS3-2)



Learning Target 1:

Describe what it takes to build a battery and explain how a rechargeable battery system uses electrical energy to power a light bulb and an electric motor.



Success Criteria 1:

You can describe the parts of a battery. You can describe the different energy transfers when a battery is charging, when a battery is connected to a light bulb, and when a battery is connected to an electric motor.



Learning Target 2:

Describe force and be able to explain how forces and energy work together.



Success Criteria 2:

Can accurately describe what a force is and give examples of different forces. Can correctly explain the difference between forces and energy as well as how they interact.



Learning Target 3:

Explain what Work and Power are and how they are calculated.



Success Criteria 3:

Can accurately explain the scientific definition of Work and Power as well as calculate the work required to move an object a certain distance as well as the power required to move it.

Article posted February 25, 2014 at 09:30 AM GMT-7 • comment • Reads 37



Article posted January 31, 2014 at 09:00 AM GMT-7 • comment • Reads 37

Watch this and see what you can and should expect from your school to take full advantage of your education:

Article posted January 31, 2014 at 09:00 AM GMT-7 • comment • Reads 37



Article posted January 31, 2014 at 08:59 AM GMT-7 • comment • Reads 42

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