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Article posted October 1, 2014 at 08:14 PM GMT-7 • comment • Reads 13229

Volcanoes Learning Target 1:



Students will be able to distinguish between different volcano types including how they differ and how they are similar and how they are formed.



Success Criteria:



Students have drawn, labeled and colored five volcano types as well as described how they are formed, their shape, and their size.



Volcanoes Learning Target 2:



Students will be able to distinguish between four different types of lava and match lava types to the five different volcano types.



Success Criteria:



Draw, color, label and describe each of the four lava types describing how the water and silica content affects how the lava acts.



Volcanoes Learning Target 3:



Match the five volcano types, four lava types and to the four different eruption types.



Success Criteria:



Students can defend the reasons why they chose to match a certain volcano type to a lava type to an eruption type.



6th grade Volcano Unit Learning Goal based on the following standard (NGSS MS-ESS2 Earth's Systems):



"Students who demonstrate understanding can:



Construct an explanation based on evidence for how geoscience processes have changed Earth’s surface at varying time and spatial scales.



Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on how processes change Earth’s surface at time and spatial scales that can be large (such as slow plate motions or the uplift of large mountain ranges) or small (such as rapid landslides or microscopic geochemical reactions), and how many geoscience processes (such as earthquakes, volcanoes, and meteor impacts) usually behave gradually but are punctuated by catastrophic events. Examples of geoscience processes include surface weathering and deposition by the movements of water, ice, and wind. Emphasis is on geoscience processes that shape local geographic features, where appropriate."



We are going to focus on the volcano parts of the above standard. Here is a proficiency scale to help students assess themselves on the standard:



Article posted October 1, 2014 at 08:14 PM GMT-7 • comment • Reads 13229



Article posted October 1, 2014 at 08:06 PM GMT-7 • comment • Reads 32

Check this blog post often to find vocabulary words that we will be learning this year! Everytime we learn new words this year add them here by leaving a comment. I'll try to add new words here too as they come up. 






Volcano Vocab:




silica


cinder


composite


stratocone or stratovolcano


tephra


lahar


aa


pahoehoe


pyroclastic


seismic (or seismicity or seismograph or seismometer)


eruption


viscosity


viscous


fluid






Energy Vocab:



energy


energy transfer


battery


rechargeable


electrodes


electrolyte


copper (Cu)


zinc (Zn)


copper sulfate solution (CuSO4)


stored chemical energy


electrical


light


heat


motion


mechanical


kinetic


potential


force


elastic


gravity


friction








Anythng else? (Leave a comment with new words.)

Article posted October 1, 2014 at 08:06 PM GMT-7 • comment • Reads 32



Article posted September 30, 2014 at 09:17 AM GMT-7 • comment • Reads 1558

Here is the Mt Saint Helens presentation I shared in class:

Article posted September 30, 2014 at 09:17 AM GMT-7 • comment • Reads 1558



Article posted September 28, 2014 at 10:58 PM GMT-7 • comment • Reads 1435

star-trek_communique



Here's the presentation that started the Voyages of the Starship Equinox. The Equinox is a Starfleet Science vessel that will propel us on a voyage of the imagination as we learn Science this year.







And here's the latest installment of your mission:

5PlangrenAnomoly

Article posted September 28, 2014 at 10:58 PM GMT-7 • comment • Reads 1435



Article posted September 21, 2014 at 04:16 PM GMT-7 • comment (7) • Reads 6082

It's not as easy or as effective as people think: Multitasking Infographic

Article posted September 21, 2014 at 04:16 PM GMT-7 • comment (7) • Reads 6082



Article posted September 21, 2014 at 04:15 PM GMT-7 • comment • Reads 15

Some good tips for making great presentations: PowerPoint Infographic

Article posted September 21, 2014 at 04:15 PM GMT-7 • comment • Reads 15



Article posted September 14, 2014 at 03:35 PM GMT-7 • comment (56) • Reads 13966

The following article was copied here for you to read from The Adventure Blog:



Ship Missing for 160 Years Found in the Arctic



"Back in 1845, famed British explorer Sir John Franklin set out to find, and navigate, the Northwest Passage. With him he took two ships, and 129 men, with the hopes of discovering a way to sail across the Arctic from the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific Ocean. Not long into the expedition, Franklin, his men, and the ships disappeared, creating one of the great mysteries of that era. Now, one of the ships has been found, shedding some light on what became of the crew.



Today, the Northwest Passage is a very real navigational route that opens for a few months each summer. Climate change has warmed the Arctic enough that the ice that once kept the Passage permanently sealed now gives way for ships to pass through. In Franklin's day however, the route was mostly a myth that a few explorers raced to discover. Sailing the Arctic Ocean in that era was a treacherous affair, fraught with uncertainty.



Franklin's ships were named the HMS Erebus and HMS Terror. Exactly which ship has been located is unclear, but a team of explorers using sonar have found, and positively identified, one of the vessels at the bottom of the Victoria Strait. They believe that locating the first ship will provide some clues as to where the second can be found as well.





When Franklin and his ships went missing, a major search operation was launched by the British Navy. From 1848 to 1859, numerous expeditions ventured into the Arctic with the hope of locating the explorer and his men. When the hope that they could still be alive faded, the search continued to discover the fate of the crew instead. Unfortunately, no trace was found, and what happened to them remained a mystery. Over the years, there have been more than 50 attempts to find Franklin's ships, but little progress was ever made. In the 1980's, three bodies that were believed to be a part of the crew were discovered, and they contained high levels of lead in their system. That led to the theory that the sailors were poisoned by lead from the cans that contained their food. The Canadian government launched its own search back in 2008, and this latest expedition was an extension of those efforts. They were finally successful just a few weeks back.



Finding the ship sheds a bit of light on what happened, but it doesn't tell the entire tale. It is believed that the two vessels became trapped in the ice, and were slowly crushed under the weight. The crew more than likely had time to abandon ship, and escape onto the ice, where they no doubt faced a difficult challenge for survival. The local Inuit tribes, which had referenced the location of the ship for years, say that the men resorted to cannibalism in an attempt to survive. Eventually, they would all succumb to cold and starvation.



Locating the ship brings a bit of closure to one of exploration's great mysteries. We will probably never know the full tale, but at least there are some indications of what happened to the crew."



Share your impressions of this fascinating story. Notice how more evidence allows for better inferences of the mysteries of the lost ships in the Northwest Passage through the Arctic Ocean.

Article posted September 14, 2014 at 03:35 PM GMT-7 • comment (56) • Reads 13966



Article posted September 14, 2014 at 03:32 PM GMT-7 • comment (63) • Reads 574

Check out this article about the recently discovered super massive dinosaur, Dreadnoughtus schrani.



After reading the article and checking out some of the videos come back here to leave a comment. In your comment share what parts of the discoveries about Dreadnoughtus schrani are observations and what parts are inferences.

Article posted September 14, 2014 at 03:32 PM GMT-7 • comment (63) • Reads 574



Article posted September 14, 2014 at 03:26 PM GMT-7 • comment (52) • Reads 451

In California's Death Valley there are mysterious stones that, as evidence shows, move! How can stones move?!



At a place called Racetrack Playa, a dry lakebed, there are stones that leave trails behind them as they move. Yet whenever people come to see these fascinating stones they don't see them moving at all!



What could cause these, "sailing stones" to move?



Before you read the following articles come up with some guesses yourself.



Here's an article that tells about the mystery.



Here's an article that explains how this incredible phenomena happens!



When you're done reading the above articles come back here to leave a comment sharing what you thought caused the rocks to move.

Article posted September 14, 2014 at 03:26 PM GMT-7 • comment (52) • Reads 451



Article posted September 14, 2014 at 03:20 PM GMT-7 • comment (66) • Reads 577

There is a glacier in McMurdo Dry Valleys in Eastern Antarctica where crimson, blood red ooze slowly seeps from a fissure in the Taylor Glacier onto the frozen Lake Bonney.



What is it? What can be causing all that red ooze from what is now being called, "Blood Glacier?"



Before reading the article that tells what causes that blood red ooze, make a guess (since you have little if any data, then it's really a guess and not an inference).



Then click here to read the cause of Blood Glacier!



When you're done come back here to click on comment and share what you thought it was.

Article posted September 14, 2014 at 03:20 PM GMT-7 • comment (66) • Reads 577