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We have three 6th grade Science classes and two 8th grade Science classes blogging here from the Pacific Northwest in Chimacum, WA! Sixth graders are learning a bit about Mt Saint Helens, environmental science through fresh water ecology, and physical science this year. Eighth graders are learning about life science this year. Please join us as we learn Science by exploring our world.
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Article posted April 17, 2012 at 10:21 AM GMT-7 • comment • Reads 68

In my plant experiment I wanted to see what ash did to plants, and guess what it helped it grow! But too much ash could kill the plant. We had 7 cups numbered 0,1,2,3,4,5,&6. The cup numbered "0" had no ash, cup "1" had 1 millimeter, cup "2" had 2 millimeters, 3 had 3 and so on all the way to 6. In the end the cup with the most ash grew the most. It also grew way faster that if the plant had to ash. To conclude my project i can say ash does help plants grow!

Article posted April 17, 2012 at 10:21 AM GMT-7 • comment • Reads 68



Article posted April 18, 2012 at 12:18 PM GMT-7 • comment • Reads 37

Me and my team did reseach on radishs. On the growth, how long it woud take and it takes it three to four weeks to grow.We did to tube a small one and a big tub.The small tube did not grow fast it grow very slow and the one in the big tub grow at the rate it should be going at.Also we tryed to do pumpkin seed but we could not get any of them and we also tryed onion and they where three years old so they did not grow





"Radish." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 19 Apr. 2012. Web. 24 Apr. 2012. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radish

Article posted April 18, 2012 at 12:18 PM GMT-7 • comment • Reads 37



Article posted April 24, 2012 at 12:02 PM GMT-7 • comment (1) • Reads 38

This week my team and I had a Plant Project on carnations and food coloring, where we put the carnations in veil's then watered them with food coloring. My claim was that 50% or less of the stem would turn blue and/or red. My evidence was that our results came out to be that the plants died at the end with little color on the stems, and the tips of the flower, all of our predictions were wrong. My research was, vascular plants have plant tissues, which circulate resources through the plant. This feature allows vascular plants to evolve to a larger size then non-vascular plants, which lack these specialized conducting tissues and are therefore restricted to relatively small sizes.



Wright, Jacob J. "Do Flowering Plants Have Vascular Tissue?" EHow. Demand Media, 30 Jan. 2011. Web. 30 Apr. 2012. http://www.ehow.com/facts_7870000_do-flowering-plants-vascular-tissue.html

Article posted April 24, 2012 at 12:02 PM GMT-7 • comment (1) • Reads 38



Article posted April 25, 2012 at 09:57 AM GMT-7 • comment (2) • Reads 35

My team and I (Taylor, Heidi, and Jonna) wanted to see if volcanic ash would act as fertilizer for our radish seeds. what we did is we had seven cups and we filled up each cup with the same amount of soil then we marked each cup as none, i ml, 2 ml, etc. all the way to 6 ml. of ash. we would water them each 20 ml. of water. near the end of the expirement the cup with 6 ml. of water. without soil the plants have nothing to anchor down in to hold them still from the wind. the soil holds in nutrients left over from surrounding dead plants.



 Jansen, Jim. "Why Do Plants Need Soil & Water?" EHow. Demand Media, 12 May 2010. Web. 01 May 2012. <http://www.ehow.com/about_6508458_do-plants-need-soil-water_.html>.

Article posted April 25, 2012 at 09:57 AM GMT-7 • comment (2) • Reads 35



Article posted April 17, 2012 at 10:25 AM GMT-7 • comment • Reads 36

My group did an expirement with rye grass. We tested different waters. We had salt and sugar water. Five vials for salt and five vials for sugar. One vial for each, salt and sugar group was ragular tap water. Each vial started with 20 ml of tap water. Then each vial we would add five ml of the product. So for salt, vial one just water and vial two had 5ml salt. Vial three 10ml salt. Vial four 15ml salt. Vial five 20ml salt. Then we added the same amout of sugar to the other five vials! I learned a lot of information about osmosis and what it was and how its a big part of the plants life. I learned why the salt effected the rye grass. "Osmosis." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 25 Apr. 2012. Web. 25 Apr. 2012. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Osmosis. Gunnin, Lucinda. "What Is the Effect of Salt on Rye Grass?" EHow. Demand Media, 10 Nov. 2010. Web. 25 Apr. 2012. http://www.ehow.com/facts_7481125_effect-salt-rye-grass.html .