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Article posted April 17, 2012 at 10:21 AM GMT-7 • comment • Reads 444

In my plant experiment I wanted to see what ash did to plants, and guess what it helped it grow! But too much ash could kill the plant. We had 7 cups numbered 0,1,2,3,4,5,&6. The cup numbered "0" had no ash, cup "1" had 1 millimeter, cup "2" had 2 millimeters, 3 had 3 and so on all the way to 6. In the end the cup with the most ash grew the most. It also grew way faster that if the plant had to ash. To conclude my project i can say ash does help plants grow!

Article posted April 17, 2012 at 10:21 AM GMT-7 • comment • Reads 444



Article posted April 18, 2012 at 12:18 PM GMT-7 • comment • Reads 54

Me and my team did reseach on radishs. On the growth, how long it woud take and it takes it three to four weeks to grow.We did to tube a small one and a big tub.The small tube did not grow fast it grow very slow and the one in the big tub grow at the rate it should be going at.Also we tryed to do pumpkin seed but we could not get any of them and we also tryed onion and they where three years old so they did not grow





"Radish." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 19 Apr. 2012. Web. 24 Apr. 2012. <[LINK]

Article posted April 18, 2012 at 12:18 PM GMT-7 • comment • Reads 54



Article posted April 24, 2012 at 12:02 PM GMT-7 • comment (1) • Reads 57

This week my team and I had a Plant Project on carnations and food coloring, where we put the carnations in veil's then watered them with food coloring. My claim was that 50% or less of the stem would turn blue and/or red. My evidence was that our results came out to be that the plants died at the end with little color on the stems, and the tips of the flower, all of our predictions were wrong. My research was, vascular plants have plant tissues, which circulate resources through the plant. This feature allows vascular plants to evolve to a larger size then non-vascular plants, which lack these specialized conducting tissues and are therefore restricted to relatively small sizes.



Wright, Jacob J. "Do Flowering Plants Have Vascular Tissue?" EHow. Demand Media, 30 Jan. 2011. Web. 30 Apr. 2012. http://www.ehow.com/facts_7870000_do-flowering-plants-vascular-tissue.html

Article posted April 24, 2012 at 12:02 PM GMT-7 • comment (1) • Reads 57



Article posted April 25, 2012 at 09:57 AM GMT-7 • comment (2) • Reads 52

My team and I (Taylor, Heidi, and Jonna) wanted to see if volcanic ash would act as fertilizer for our radish seeds. what we did is we had seven cups and we filled up each cup with the same amount of soil then we marked each cup as none, i ml, 2 ml, etc. all the way to 6 ml. of ash. we would water them each 20 ml. of water. near the end of the expirement the cup with 6 ml. of water. without soil the plants have nothing to anchor down in to hold them still from the wind. the soil holds in nutrients left over from surrounding dead plants.



 Jansen, Jim. "Why Do Plants Need Soil & Water?" EHow. Demand Media, 12 May 2010. Web. 01 May 2012. <[LINK]>.

Article posted April 25, 2012 at 09:57 AM GMT-7 • comment (2) • Reads 52



Article posted April 17, 2012 at 10:25 AM GMT-7 • comment • Reads 46

My group did an expirement with rye grass. We tested different waters. We had salt and sugar water. Five vials for salt and five vials for sugar. One vial for each, salt and sugar group was ragular tap water. Each vial started with 20 ml of tap water. Then each vial we would add five ml of the product. So for salt, vial one just water and vial two had 5ml salt. Vial three 10ml salt. Vial four 15ml salt. Vial five 20ml salt. Then we added the same amout of sugar to the other five vials! I learned a lot of information about osmosis and what it was and how its a big part of the plants life. I learned why the salt effected the rye grass. "Osmosis." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 25 Apr. 2012. Web. 25 Apr. 2012. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Osmosis. Gunnin, Lucinda. "What Is the Effect of Salt on Rye Grass?" EHow. Demand Media, 10 Nov. 2010. Web. 25 Apr. 2012. http://www.ehow.com/facts_7481125_effect-salt-rye-grass.html .

Article posted April 17, 2012 at 10:25 AM GMT-7 • comment • Reads 46



Article posted April 25, 2012 at 09:43 AM GMT-7 • comment • Reads 49

My plant experiment was how the tempeture afects cacti in the dark. We had one in the incubator at body temp wich is 96.5 ferenheight. We had another in the fridge at the dessert night temp wich is about 45 ferenheight. And one room tempiture wich is 68-72 degrees f. The room temp did best but it got some light because otheres put theirs in the closet as well and it got more air circulation. The cold did the second best and it was preaty much a perfect experiment. The one in the incubator was cooked because it was hotter than it is used to.

Article posted April 25, 2012 at 09:43 AM GMT-7 • comment • Reads 49



Article posted April 18, 2012 at 12:18 PM GMT-7 • comment (1) • Reads 52

my team study tubers (potatoes, onions, yams, and others like that) and tried to a potato clock. a tuber is a eatable root. Most tubers have many acids in them. they produce energy because they have all those acids in them it creates a chemical reaction between copper and zinc or magnesium. in our project we tried to make a potato clock. We couldn't get the clock to work with potatoes or with yams but we did create 4.0 volts. i was in-charge of studding why tuber produce energy. this is the website i used.



Senn, Rob. "How Do Potatoes Produce Electricity?" EHow. Demand Media, 17 June 2010. Web. 18 Apr. 2012. <http://www.ehow.com/about_6640109_do-potatoes-produce-electricity_.html>.

Article posted April 18, 2012 at 12:18 PM GMT-7 • comment (1) • Reads 52



Article posted April 17, 2012 at 10:21 AM GMT-7 • comment (2) • Reads 60

For ourexperiment we had 4 different cups with rhi grass seeds in them and we out salt water in one sugar water in another. We also had one with hot water just from the fosset and one with cold water. Over like 2 weeks the sugar and salt water cups did not grow at all. The sugar cup didnt grow at all because the sugar cant dissolve into the soil because it lowers the osmotic potential of the soils water. Soil water normally has a higher osmotic potential than the water inside of the plant, because if this the grass naturally draws water up into its self. If the soil ends up having an overall lower osmotic pressure than the plant the water will not flow from the soil to the plant, killing it because no matter how much you water it the sugar stops the flow. Salt water can also kill plants. The salt draws water away from the plants roots and messis with the plants ability to receive nutrients from the soil and photosynthesize.

Bibliography:

"Rhygrass." Wikipedia. Wikimedia foundation, 04 Oct. 2012.