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Mr. Witte's Music Technology Blog-

Music Tech Lab, Rm. 155

This class is for high school students at Winnebago Lutheran Academy who want to learn how to make music on computers. We use Audacity and Garageband as our main tools, and we have fun almost every single day figuring out how to make music using audio and MIDI, but we also learn how to record vocals and instruments and even play guitar and drums if we need to.

We keep personal blogs (look on the right column of this page and click on our names) to help us remember what we've been working on, keep track of the all the decisions that we've made on our projects, and to share with our family and friends the music that we've created.

NEW 2013-2014 We're moving our blogs to Google's Blogger since WLA is using Google Apps for Education. Click here for Mr. Witte's new Music Tech blog. Click on the student names in the right hand column below to find links to their Google blogs for Music Tech and to see and hear what they've been working on in class.



by Dale Witte
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Title: Scales, Part 1 (10/06/08)
Description: Read In Tune October 2008, pp. 28-32 for Tuesday, Oct. 7. We will be talking about what makes a scale major or minor tomorrow.

Article posted October 7, 2008 at 10:51 AM GMT-6 • comment • Reads 247

The Major Scale: W W H W W W H

What does this mean?

This is the pattern of whole and half steps that makes up a major scale. In other words, if you want to make a major scale starting on C, you'd have to calculate whole and half steps up from C on a piano keyboard, like this:

Start on C. The next note needs to be a WHOLE STEP up. A whole step on a piano keyboard always has another note (either black or white) in between. So, a whole step up from C is D (the next white key) because there is a black key (C#/Db) in between. Whole steps ALWAYS have a note in between.

From D, go up one more WHOLE STEP (remember to skip a note in between!). The third note of the C Major scale is E (because D#/Eb is in between).

From E, go up a HALF STEP. A half step on a piano keyboard is any two adjacent notes (in other words, any two keys which touch each other are adjacent). Therefore, F is a half step up from E.

Going up from F you need another WHOLE STEP. Skipping F#/Gb in between you get G, then A (another WHOLE STEP), then B (another WHOLE STEP). Finally, the major scale is topped off with one more HALF STEP. That's from B to C (there's no other note in between). So, the pattern of whole and half steps for ANY major scale is: W W H W W W H.

Need more practice?  Go to Ricci Adam's musictheory.net for lessons on Steps and Accidentals and the Major Scale, and a cool Scale Ear Trainer (click off everything except natural minor and major to start easily).

By the way, some people think of the pattern of whole and half steps in the major scale in a different way, numbering each note in the scale 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8.  Then they just think "Where are the half steps?"  The answer is "Between 3 & 4 and 7 & 8".  It's less to remember!!!

Article posted October 7, 2008 at 10:51 AM GMT-6 • comment • Reads 247



Article posted October 8, 2008 at 10:38 AM GMT-6 • comment • Reads 104

The Minor Scale: W H W W H W W

What does this mean?

This is the pattern of whole and half steps that makes up a major scale. BUT i have never memorized it this way.  I always remember it with numbers: the half steps are between 2 & 3 and 5 & 6.  If your minor scale starts on A and ends on A (using all white keys) then the half steps are between B & C (that's 2 & 3) and E & F (that's 5 & 6).

Article posted October 8, 2008 at 10:38 AM GMT-6 • comment • Reads 104



Article posted October 9, 2008 at 09:43 PM GMT-6 • comment • Reads 45

Lately we have been working on scales that are major and scales that are minor. DW showed us this super cool thinger jiggy. Scale Ear Trainer. It's so cool! I keep playing on it over and over!



 



It really is exciting!

Article posted October 9, 2008 at 09:43 PM GMT-6 • comment • Reads 45



Article posted October 10, 2008 at 08:06 AM GMT-6 • comment • Reads 42

lately in class weve been learning about scales. weve been doing ear training with the major and minor scales. its pretty fun. i think its cool how theres so many differant scales, one for each note all the way up the white keys. its pretty fun. i hope we get in to the harmonic and melodic scales also

Article posted October 10, 2008 at 08:06 AM GMT-6 • comment • Reads 42



Article posted October 9, 2008 at 09:23 PM GMT-6 • comment • Reads 43

There are two main types of scales: major and minor. Major and minor scales differ from each other in the way they are made and they way they feel. Major scales have a pattern of WWHWWWH while minor scales have a pattern of WHWWHWW. Major scales also differ from minor scales because major scales sound happy while minor scales sound sad. When you listen to a scale, the best way to tell if it is major or minor is to listen to the third note. The third note in a major scale has a whole step between it and the second note, while a minor scale has only a half step between its second and third note.

Article posted October 9, 2008 at 09:23 PM GMT-6 • comment • Reads 43



Article posted October 14, 2008 at 08:29 AM GMT-6 • comment • Reads 47

Lately weve been doing a lot of work with the major and minor scales of music.id heard of them before and used to sing to them when i went to faith for Youth Praise choir,but now were getting really into it and using and ear trainer to help us identify the major and minor scales.some people can tell by the actual music of it but really i listen to it by ear with the whole happy/ sad melody thing.its a little easier for me that way

Article posted October 14, 2008 at 08:29 AM GMT-6 • comment • Reads 47



Article posted October 7, 2008 at 10:43 AM GMT-6 • comment • Reads 46

Whole Whole Half Whole Whole Whole Half! That is how you can tell the difference between a major and minor scales.  That is the pattern that they have used.  A whole step has a note adjacent to it.  A half step does not have a note inbetween.  It is easy to notice when you listen to the 3rd note of the scale.  Majors scales are sometimes referred to as the happy scales and the minor ones are called sad.  Scales are fun=http://!!!!  Some people tend to forget that there are notes before and after the w and hs.  Numbering the notes can be easier for some people so that they only have to remmeber that the half step is between 3 and 4 and then 7 and 8!


Article posted October 7, 2008 at 10:43 AM GMT-6 • comment • Reads 46



Article posted October 7, 2008 at 10:52 AM GMT-6 • comment • Reads 47

W W H W W W H



These are the patterns for the whole and the half steps that make up the major scale. In other words, if you want to make a mjaor scale starting on c, you'd have to calculate whole and half steps up from c  on a piano keyboard, like this:



Start on c. The next note needs to be a whole step up. A whole step on a piano keyboard always has another note (either balck or white) in between. So, a WHOLE step up from c is d ( the next white key) because there is a black key (c#/Db) in between. Whole steps ALWAYS have a note in between.



From D, go up one more whole step ( remembler to skip a note in between!) The third note of the C Major scale is E ( because D#/Eb is in between.)



From E, go up a HALF STEP. A half step on a piano keyboard is any two adjacent notes ( in other words, any two keys which touch each other are adjacent.) Therefore, F is a half step up form E.



By the way, some people think of the pattern of whole and half steps in the major scale in a different way, numbering each note in the scale 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8. Then the just think where are the half steps? The answer is between 3&4, 7&8 its less to remember.



 

Article posted October 7, 2008 at 10:52 AM GMT-6 • comment • Reads 47



Article posted October 7, 2008 at 10:48 AM GMT-6 • comment • Reads 43

W W h W W W h This is the pattern we received that makes a scale major scale a half step is going to the next adjacent key whether it be a white or black key but a whole step is skipping one key and going to the next. In the pattern the w's represent a whole step and the h's mean a half step. Go on your piano or keyboard and just try this pattern and voila you've just made a scale. There is a different way to think of this pattern though, such as numbering the keys and you will see that the half steps would go in between three and four and seven and eight.

Article posted October 7, 2008 at 10:48 AM GMT-6 • comment • Reads 43



Article posted October 3, 2008 at 11:39 AM GMT-6 • comment • Reads 43

In class we got a new mag. that we will talk about what we are doing for it

Article posted October 3, 2008 at 11:39 AM GMT-6 • comment • Reads 43



Article posted October 7, 2008 at 10:49 AM GMT-6 • comment • Reads 42

W W H W W W H. is the pattern that makes the major scale that consistes of whole steps and half steps 2 make different scales of music. By using the w w h w w w h step pattern we r able to read music and will b able 2 play it better. the major scale when looking at the notes the half steps are between the 3rd & 4th and between the 7th & 8th notes because its less to try to remember


Article posted October 7, 2008 at 10:49 AM GMT-6 • comment • Reads 42



My Classes & Students

Block 3, Sem 1 13-14
Block 3, Sem 2 13-14
Block 8, Sem 1 13-14
Block 8, Sem 2 13-14

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Dale Witte is the choir director and music technology teacher at Winnebago Lutheran Academy, Fond du Lac, WI. He has been teaching since January 1990 and really enjoys teaching students how God's gift of music works. Dale is also a church organist, piano player, violinist, and church music composer. Locations of visitors to this page

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