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by teacher: Brian McLaughlin
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Article posted May 6, 2012 at 09:54 PM GMT • comment • Reads 63

For the full article visit CNN's website



One of Facebook's biggest issues in IPO is privacy, a recent study shows that 13 million American Facebook ussers are unaware of the privacy controls that IPO entails. Because of this people the amound of people that have fake information on their profile has increased, all in order to protect their identities. 



One of Facebook's controversial pricavy control is the policy of sharing user's data with a third party via applications. This can occasionally be done by a "friend" without the person even knowing. If a friend runs an app and you have not been very specific with your privacy settings, your friend could accindentally give "the app" access to your information.



As a Facebook user, I personally violated by policies such as this one that Facebook has over its users. I am against this policy and many others IPO is causing regarding Facebook's privacy control, it's unfair to the users that use it so harmlessly. However I think that no matter how meticulous you are with your privacy setting, Facebook  will always have unfair control over your privacy once you click the "I agree to the Terms of Use" button. All you can do is be careful with what you put out on the internet.



 



Segall, L. (2012, May 04). Millions of Americans Ignore Facebook's Privacy Controls. Retrieved from http://money.cnn.com/2012/05/03/technology/facebook-privacy-controls/index.htm



 

Article posted May 6, 2012 at 09:54 PM GMT • comment • Reads 63



Article posted April 29, 2012 at 04:00 PM GMT • comment • Reads 35

For more of this article go to the New York Times website. 



Handwritten messages appear to become less and less common, but the one place where you can still find it is a medical prescription. However, that's probably where you don't want to find it, a simple slppy hadwriting mistake can lead to what's called A.D.E. (adverse drug events). These events are quite preventable if a physician simply a prescription via email.



Professor Rainu Kaushal of Weill Cornell Medical College led a study with four fellow colleagues. They observed and compared the effects of electronically sending in prescriptions and handwriting them at outpatient settings in New York. The results showed there were 37 handwritten errors out of the 100 paper prescriptions and only 7 out of the 100 electronically sent prescriptions.



The Institute of Medicine estimated that hospitals spend about two billion dollars on A.D.E.'s in the United States. However because of Medicare and Medicaid and the stimulus package in 2009, switching to e-prescribing and electronic health records can cost tens of thousands of dollars. Another barrier that keeps things from being totally elctronic is that it disrupts work flow.



Despite the negative effects, e-prescribing is growing rapidly, when a setting decides to go electronic e-prescribing is left as an option. "...about two-thirds of prescriptions are generated electonically...it's hard to get that remaining third converted." says Dr. David W. Bates, chief of general internal medicine at Bringham and Women's Hospital in Boston and Harvard Medical School professor.



Despite all the cons of going electronic, it's apparent that technology helps prevent errors and A.D.E. I think that as technology grows and future medical workers are growing up with itscribblingon a prescription pad will be replaced by typing.



 



Stross, R. (2012, April 28) Chicken scratch vs. electronic prescriptions. The New York Times.Retrieved from http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/29/business/e-prescriptions-reduce-errors-but-their-adoption-is-slow.html?_r=2&ref=health

Article posted April 29, 2012 at 04:00 PM GMT • comment • Reads 35



Article posted April 20, 2012 at 09:38 PM GMT • comment • Reads 37

For the full article go to npr.org 





Greenpeace, an international nongovernment agency, set out its yearly report asking "How Clean (and Green) is Your Cloud?" They observed the six largest internet companies, scrutinizing their cloud facilities to see just how efficient these companies are. A cloud facility is where large companies get their electricity from. Large companies can use as much electricity as 180,000 homes. Making it quite difficult to power and remain green.







Amazon, Apple, and Microsoft are continually and quickly growing, and they depend on coal. Coal is a heavy polluting resource, which ultimatley left Amazon and Apple with "F's." When Greenpeace communitcated its discoveries with Apple and Amazon, some disputes over accuracy broke.





Yahoo on the other hand seems to have been the using clean and renewable resources for electricity. Both Yahoo and Google have always been pushing for renewable energy sources. Especially now with their company in Facebook, that is being buitl in Sweden, which utilizes wind as a major energy source. Dell has also been using much clean and renewable sources for energy. 



Good news for Yahoo, Google, and Dell for making good use of our Earth's natural and renewable resources. I hope to see improvement from Microsoft, Amazon, and Apple, I think we should all try to be a little greener.






Henn, S. (Writer) (2012). Greenpeace: How clean (and green) is your cloud? [Radio series episode]. InAll Tech Considered. New York: National Public Radio. Retrieved from http://www.npr.org/blogs/alltechconsidered/2012/04/17/150808257/greenpeace-how-clean-and-green-is-your-cloud

Article posted April 20, 2012 at 09:38 PM GMT • comment • Reads 37



Article posted March 21, 2012 at 01:11 AM GMT • comment • Reads 37

Article posted March 21, 2012 at 01:11 AM GMT • comment • Reads 37



Article posted March 9, 2012 at 07:07 PM GMT • comment • Reads 42


Find more videos like this on Flat Classroom Project

Article posted March 9, 2012 at 07:07 PM GMT • comment • Reads 42



Article posted February 20, 2012 at 05:44 PM GMT • comment • Reads 41

In the laboratories at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 92 infants at 6 months old had an MRI called diffusion tensor imaging. All the babies tested were at high risk for autism due to their older siblings having it. The children were then tested again at 1 and 2 years old, also at 2 years old they had a behavioral test. 28 of them showed signs of autism through the behavioral test.





After looking at all 3 brain scans, researchers noticed that the white matter fiber showed a different development. The white matter fiber are pathways that neurons in the brain use to connect to other parts of the brain. The brain scans of the 28 kids diagnosed with autism revealed that the white matter pathways grew quicker and more dense than normal.





Although this has not been proven to be a 100 percent effective test for autism and many people debate its efficiency, it leads us on the right path. Because of the technology we have today, we are able to get this kind of research and hopefully be able to research further with neuro-imaging.



Click here to see more of this article





Falco, M. (2012, February 17). The chart: Brain scans in infants shed light on autism onset. Retrieved from http://thechart.blogs.cnn.com/2012/02/17/brain-scans-in-infants-shed-light-on-autism-onset/?

Article posted February 20, 2012 at 05:44 PM GMT • comment • Reads 41



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