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Sixth grade Science students blogging from the Pacific Northwest in Chimacum, WA!
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by teacher: Alfonso Gonzalez
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Article posted April 17, 2012 at 05:21 PM GMT • comment • Reads 297

In my plant experiment I wanted to see what ash did to plants, and guess what it helped it grow! But too much ash could kill the plant. We had 7 cups numbered 0,1,2,3,4,5,&6. The cup numbered "0" had no ash, cup "1" had 1 millimeter, cup "2" had 2 millimeters, 3 had 3 and so on all the way to 6. In the end the cup with the most ash grew the most. It also grew way faster that if the plant had to ash. To conclude my project i can say ash does help plants grow!

Article posted April 17, 2012 at 05:21 PM GMT • comment • Reads 297



Article posted April 18, 2012 at 07:18 PM GMT • comment • Reads 44

Me and my team did reseach on radishs. On the growth, how long it woud take and it takes it three to four weeks to grow.We did to tube a small one and a big tub.The small tube did not grow fast it grow very slow and the one in the big tub grow at the rate it should be going at.Also we tryed to do pumpkin seed but we could not get any of them and we also tryed onion and they where three years old so they did not grow





"Radish." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 19 Apr. 2012. Web. 24 Apr. 2012. <[LINK]

Article posted April 18, 2012 at 07:18 PM GMT • comment • Reads 44



Article posted April 24, 2012 at 07:02 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 49

This week my team and I had a Plant Project on carnations and food coloring, where we put the carnations in veil's then watered them with food coloring. My claim was that 50% or less of the stem would turn blue and/or red. My evidence was that our results came out to be that the plants died at the end with little color on the stems, and the tips of the flower, all of our predictions were wrong. My research was, vascular plants have plant tissues, which circulate resources through the plant. This feature allows vascular plants to evolve to a larger size then non-vascular plants, which lack these specialized conducting tissues and are therefore restricted to relatively small sizes.



Wright, Jacob J. "Do Flowering Plants Have Vascular Tissue?" EHow. Demand Media, 30 Jan. 2011. Web. 30 Apr. 2012. http://www.ehow.com/facts_7870000_do-flowering-plants-vascular-tissue.html

Article posted April 24, 2012 at 07:02 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 49



Article posted April 25, 2012 at 04:57 PM GMT • comment (2) • Reads 46

My team and I (Taylor, Heidi, and Jonna) wanted to see if volcanic ash would act as fertilizer for our radish seeds. what we did is we had seven cups and we filled up each cup with the same amount of soil then we marked each cup as none, i ml, 2 ml, etc. all the way to 6 ml. of ash. we would water them each 20 ml. of water. near the end of the expirement the cup with 6 ml. of water. without soil the plants have nothing to anchor down in to hold them still from the wind. the soil holds in nutrients left over from surrounding dead plants.



 Jansen, Jim. "Why Do Plants Need Soil & Water?" EHow. Demand Media, 12 May 2010. Web. 01 May 2012. <[LINK]>.

Article posted April 25, 2012 at 04:57 PM GMT • comment (2) • Reads 46



Article posted April 17, 2012 at 05:25 PM GMT • comment • Reads 42

My group did an expirement with rye grass. We tested different waters. We had salt and sugar water. Five vials for salt and five vials for sugar. One vial for each, salt and sugar group was ragular tap water. Each vial started with 20 ml of tap water. Then each vial we would add five ml of the product. So for salt, vial one just water and vial two had 5ml salt. Vial three 10ml salt. Vial four 15ml salt. Vial five 20ml salt. Then we added the same amout of sugar to the other five vials! I learned a lot of information about osmosis and what it was and how its a big part of the plants life. I learned why the salt effected the rye grass. "Osmosis." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 25 Apr. 2012. Web. 25 Apr. 2012. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Osmosis. Gunnin, Lucinda. "What Is the Effect of Salt on Rye Grass?" EHow. Demand Media, 10 Nov. 2010. Web. 25 Apr. 2012. http://www.ehow.com/facts_7481125_effect-salt-rye-grass.html .

Article posted April 17, 2012 at 05:25 PM GMT • comment • Reads 42



Article posted April 25, 2012 at 04:43 PM GMT • comment • Reads 46

My plant experiment was how the tempeture afects cacti in the dark. We had one in the incubator at body temp wich is 96.5 ferenheight. We had another in the fridge at the dessert night temp wich is about 45 ferenheight. And one room tempiture wich is 68-72 degrees f. The room temp did best but it got some light because otheres put theirs in the closet as well and it got more air circulation. The cold did the second best and it was preaty much a perfect experiment. The one in the incubator was cooked because it was hotter than it is used to.

Article posted April 25, 2012 at 04:43 PM GMT • comment • Reads 46



Article posted April 18, 2012 at 07:18 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 45

my team study tubers (potatoes, onions, yams, and others like that) and tried to a potato clock. a tuber is a eatable root. Most tubers have many acids in them. they produce energy because they have all those acids in them it creates a chemical reaction between copper and zinc or magnesium. in our project we tried to make a potato clock. We couldn't get the clock to work with potatoes or with yams but we did create 4.0 volts. i was in-charge of studding why tuber produce energy. this is the website i used.



Senn, Rob. "How Do Potatoes Produce Electricity?" EHow. Demand Media, 17 June 2010. Web. 18 Apr. 2012. <http://www.ehow.com/about_6640109_do-potatoes-produce-electricity_.html>.

Article posted April 18, 2012 at 07:18 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 45



Article posted April 17, 2012 at 05:21 PM GMT • comment (2) • Reads 55

For ourexperiment we had 4 different cups with rhi grass seeds in them and we out salt water in one sugar water in another. We also had one with hot water just from the fosset and one with cold water. Over like 2 weeks the sugar and salt water cups did not grow at all. The sugar cup didnt grow at all because the sugar cant dissolve into the soil because it lowers the osmotic potential of the soils water. Soil water normally has a higher osmotic potential than the water inside of the plant, because if this the grass naturally draws water up into its self. If the soil ends up having an overall lower osmotic pressure than the plant the water will not flow from the soil to the plant, killing it because no matter how much you water it the sugar stops the flow. Salt water can also kill plants. The salt draws water away from the plants roots and messis with the plants ability to receive nutrients from the soil and photosynthesize.

Bibliography:

"Rhygrass." Wikipedia. Wikimedia foundation, 04 Oct. 2012. Web. 23 Pr. 2012. [LINK].

Article posted April 17, 2012 at 05:21 PM GMT • comment (2) • Reads 55



Article posted April 17, 2012 at 05:28 PM GMT • comment • Reads 44

my group and i did an experiment on rye grass. we wanted to know how different amounts of salt and sugar Water would affect the rye grasses growth. well, all it did was mold... even the plant without sugar or salt molded.

we started the project by taking 10 viles (5 for suger water and 5 for salt water) 1 vile out of each set of 5 had just plain water in it. well, none of our plants grew... though we researched and think we know the reason why!:)

so for the salt water, we believe that because the salt water Weekend the plant and caused waterstress to the rye grass even though it had plenty of water. We think the rye grass died that sat in the sugar water because the plant was over watered and couldn't absorbe it due to the presence of sugar unbalancing the plants ability to absorb moisture.

Article posted April 17, 2012 at 05:28 PM GMT • comment • Reads 44



Article posted April 17, 2012 at 05:14 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 52

Weekday experiment to see if volcanic ash would help grow radish plants. We observed and saw that it did. The plant with six ml's of ash grew about three inches more then the one without ash on it. We did have one inaccuracy..... I accidentally knocked over a plant.... That one didn't grow very well. We did make a model volcano and tried to make a simulation of mount saint helens erupting but that didn't work out. Ash holds in Wat and we proved that because whenever we would go to water the plants they would still have water anthem from the previous day. Ash also encourages bacteria which actually helps the plants grow. We also learned that if you put more then four inches of ash on a plant you cam get sick. All in all this was a very fun experiment and we learned a lot.

bibliography: Works Cited

Patrick, Josh. "The Effects of Volcanic Eruption on the Environment." EHow. Demand Media, 11 Apr. 2011. Web. 24 Apr. 2012. [LINK].

"Volcanic Ash—Effects on Agriculture and Mitigation Strategies." Volcanic Ash—Effects on Agriculture and Mitigation Strategies. Usgs, 3 Feb. 2009. Web. 24 Apr. 2012. [LINK].

"What Effect Does Volcanic Ash Have on the Environment? - Curiosity." Curiosity. Discoverycommunications Llc, 2011. Web. 24 Apr. 2012. [LINK].

Article posted April 17, 2012 at 05:14 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 52



Article posted April 18, 2012 at 07:09 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 43

So for the past couple weeks,my group and i have been trying to grow Lima beans but also get a lot of interesting facts about them. Our Lima beans did not grow they ended up splitting in half and molding because we did not control how much water was entering our container of dirt so they pretty much flooded because we had them on top of the roof on the building out side. Plus we had very little sunlight for the Lima beans. But when we presented we had a Prezi for our experiment and what we did wrong. On our i-movie we had many interesting facts about Lima beans and the different types such as bush Lima beans and pole Lima beans. Lima beans are also known as chad and butter beans. This is what are experiment turned out to be.



Article posted April 18, 2012 at 07:09 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 43



Article posted May 1, 2012 at 06:59 PM GMT • comment • Reads 50

my team study tubers (potatoes, onions, yams, and others like that) and tried to a potato clock. a tuber is a eatable root. Most tubers have many acids in them. they produce energy because they have all those acids in them it creates a chemical reaction between copper and zinc or magnesium. in our project we tried to make a potato clock. We couldn't get the clock to work with potatoes or with yams but we did create 4.0 volts. i was in-charge of studding why tuber produce energy. this is the website i used.



Senn, Rob. "How Do Potatoes Produce Electricity?" EHow. Demand Media, 17 June 2010. Web. 18 Apr. 2012. <[LINK]>.

Article posted May 1, 2012 at 06:59 PM GMT • comment • Reads 50



Article posted April 18, 2012 at 07:06 PM GMT • comment • Reads 48

for the past few weeks we have been doing a plant experiment!,my group did lima beans and we got a lot of interesting facts about them and we learned a lot and we put them on the roof of the school so they could get sun light and we put one with a lot of water and one with less water and it failed because over spring break it rained almost everyday so it added more water and it flooded the lima beans and made them all moldy and rotten and they stunk really bad so, they didn't even grow at all on even a sprout or anything... its kinda a bummer that it didn't work but we made a video about it and its on youtube!!!



Article posted April 18, 2012 at 07:06 PM GMT • comment • Reads 48



Article posted May 2, 2012 at 05:27 PM GMT • comment • Reads 61

Our experiment involved cacti. We wanted to know what environment would be best for cactus growth. We had a cactus in the incubator about 93 degrees F with paper over the incubator door window we also put one in a mini fridge 45 F no light either then we had a cactus in the closet for room temperature 76F. Our controlled variables were light exposure and the amount of water we gave the cactus which was two squirts from a spray bottle every three days. Inaccuracies the cactus in the closet was exposed to more sunlight because other teams had their experiment in the closet so it was opened often. The fridge was opened for food often as well. Another problem was that the temperature in the incubator was too hot for the cactus at 93f when a cactus is better in 85f degrees. Our cactus was a Cardon or false saguaro is native to Mexico and Baja California. It grows to 30 feet in height and 3 feet in diameter. Also its lifespan is 100+ years. Here is a movie made by my teammate of my cactus being cut open.



Click Here



to watch it.

Article posted May 2, 2012 at 05:27 PM GMT • comment • Reads 61



Article posted March 22, 2012 at 05:21 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 40

The past few weeks we have been doing a plant experiment on rye grass. We watered the rye grass with salt water and sugar water. We used four viles to water the rye grass with salt water, another four viles we watered the rye grass with sugar water, and two more wiles we watered the rye grass with just regular tap water. We thought that the rye grass would grow with the sugar water and we didn't really think that the rye grass would grow that much with salt water, but we thought it would grow at least a little bit. The rye grass didnt grow for a few weeks, then the rye grasses watered with the sugar water started to grow mold and it kept growing more and more, the rye grass watered with the salt water made salt crystals on top of the soil, even the rye grass watered with regular water didnt grow. We researched on what the salt or sugar water effect is on rye grass. For the salt it said that some salt helps the rye grass absorb nutrients but it says that too much salt will kill rye grass. For the Sugar it says that it helps the rye grass grow but it still didn't grow.

Article posted March 22, 2012 at 05:21 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 40



Article posted May 2, 2012 at 06:51 PM GMT • comment • Reads 51

i learned that vascular plants are very different then other plants. scientisits believe plants evolved from green algae 460million years ago and the most recent plants are vascular plants from 350million years ago.

Article posted May 2, 2012 at 06:51 PM GMT • comment • Reads 51



Article posted April 24, 2012 at 05:03 PM GMT • comment • Reads 112

My team (Zach and Justin) did an experiment on a Cardon cactus or also known as the False Saguaro. The Cardon is native to Mexico, Baja, and California and is one of the deserts most magnificent giants (but our cacti's were only 8.5"). My cactus can grow to 30' in height, with bases up 3' in diameter. The lifespan is 100+ years. The experiment: We had three cacti's and put them in three different environments. One being 98F (in an incubator), another 68F (room temp.), and the third at 37F (in an fridge). To control variables we had to change some things. One, the cactus in the fridge didn't get light so we covered the plastic door of the incubator and put the room temp. cactus in a closet, so now all three are getting no light. Two, we watered the cactus every other day with two squirts of a water spray bottle. The hypothesis is that the cactus the incubator will look the healthiest by the time our experiment is completed because cactus, being native to the desert, will grow the best in the hot climate. Here is our table of results:  





As you see we were wrong, the hot climate Cardon cactus started to burn and the room temp. cactus did the best. Inaccuracies we had were one, the room temp. cactus had air circulation and plus at night when the heat was turned off the temperature change which is essential for cactus. Click Here is a movie I made of when my teamate cut open a cactus.



Bibliography Anitei, Stefan. "10 Facts About Cacti." Softpedia. Web. 25 Apr. 2012.

Article posted April 24, 2012 at 05:03 PM GMT • comment • Reads 112



Article posted April 18, 2012 at 07:25 PM GMT • comment (2) • Reads 53

In my plant researched and experiment. Marissa and I did our experiment project on miracle grow and regular soil. We planted flowers in each type of soil. As a result, the regular soil made the plants grow better, faster and healthier. The miracle grow took 5-6 days after the flowers had sprouted in regular soil. we think that the reason why our flowers grew better in the regular soil due to the soil that we got from the high shcool green house. We dont know what nutrients and what kind of soil it is. The greenhouse soil are for plants to grow healthy. So the soil from the greenhouse have a huge role to play in our experiment. We did some researched on our plants and flowe structures that we showed in our presentation. I learned that the reason why our flowers grew towards the light due to photosytheisis. Plant needs as much photosythesis as much as possible so therfore, they grow towards the sunlight. i learned about how seeds are a living organism. They have the embryo to create plants in the future and seeds have some stred energy in themself ready to be planted and sprout. We also researched about flowers structures such as, petal, ovule, ovary, stigma, carpel, etc.



 



Bibliograhy:



"Flowering Plants." Flowering Plants. Web. Mar.-Apr. 2012.



www.leavingbio.net/FLOWERING%20PLANTS.htm



Jeffrey. "What Do Plants Need to Live?" Kid Scientist, 3 Nov. 2007. Web. 07 Apr. 2012. 



kidscientist.com/58/what-do-plants-need-to-live



Pettebone, David. "What Does A Plant Need To Grow." Catalogs.com. Catalogs.com, 2007. Web. 19 Apr. 2012.



www.catalogs.com/info/garden-yard/what-does-a-plant-need-to-grow.html



Carter, J. Stein Stein. "Photosynthesis." Photosynthesis. 1996. Web. 10 Apr. 2012.



biology.clc.uc.edu/courses/bio104/photosyn.htm



 

Article posted April 18, 2012 at 07:25 PM GMT • comment (2) • Reads 53



Article posted April 17, 2012 at 04:54 PM GMT • comment • Reads 39

 For the past few weeks my group and I have been working on growng rye grass! The experiment consisted of putting rye grass seeds in a compost-sand mix and watering it every week with either warm water, cold water, salt water and sugar water, then drawing the results out on a poster. We expected the sugar-watered seeds to grow better than normal, the salt-watered seeds to not grow at all or to ever-so-slowly grow, the cold water to grow normally, and the warm water to absolutely kill the seeds and all possible growth. 



       At the end of the two week experiment, the results were something we never expected! The salt water AND sugar water had both caused no growth, whereas the plants watered with warm and cold water had plenty of growth! My group and I figured out that the salt water had destroyed the plants because when salt dissolves in water, it separates into sodium and bicarbonate. When the salt water was given to the plant, the sodium took away the nutrients in the soil, while the bicarbonate messed with the plant's ability to photosynthesize and absorb nutrients from the soil. We had also figured out why sugar water negatively affected the rye grass! In a normal plant-soil relationship, the osmotic pressure of the soil is higher than the plant's inner osmotic pressure, so when water is absorbed into the soil, the plant draws it up. However, sugar lowers the osmotic potential of the soil, so when sugar is regularly put into the soil, the osmotic pressure is lowered significantly to the point where the soil's pressure is so low that no matter how much you water it, the plant will still not be able to draw water from the soil, no matter how much you water it!



 





King, Tom. "Does Sugar Affect Plant Growth?" EHow. Demand Media, 10 Mar. 2011. Web. 04 May 2012. <[LINK]>.



Hill, Patricia. "What Effect Does Salt Water Have on Plants?" EHow. Demand Media, 30 Apr. 2009. Web. 04 May 2012. <[LINK]>.



Article posted April 17, 2012 at 04:54 PM GMT • comment • Reads 39



Article posted April 25, 2012 at 05:20 PM GMT • comment • Reads 46

Henry and I wanted to know how colored water would affect the color of the carnations that are in the water. Our experiment: we took two white carnations and split the stems down the middle up to about 3/4 of the way up. we then took four cups with different colored water. one had clear water, another green, and 2 cups had red. We put the two parts of one flower into the clear and red cups, and the other with red and green. we predicted that the flowers would absorb the colors and be a mix of the two colors. Our result was the flowers absorbed the water and were split down the middle in terms of color. so the red and green flower had one half red and the other half green. we found out that the process of a plant absorbing water is called cappilary action. cappilary tubes are like little straws that suck up he water and carry it throughout the plant. the tubes that hold the cappilaries are called xylems. The food coloring was absorbed with the water through the xylems and showed up in the pedals of the flower. So our experiment was successful.

Article posted April 25, 2012 at 05:20 PM GMT • comment • Reads 46



Article posted April 18, 2012 at 07:09 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 50

My team came up with an experiment to test the space of the growth of a plant to see if it would make a difference and well it did. A lot. The spaces the we picked was a tub full with seeds (radishes), the next was a small tube with 15 seeds mix in both compost. the seeds took about 2-3 weeks to grow. We finally came to a conciliation the space dose matter the tube had a much slower growth rate because of the more compacted carbon-dioxide so the process was much slower.



.

Article posted April 18, 2012 at 07:09 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 50



Article posted April 24, 2012 at 05:15 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 40

Me and my bud Sams carnation Powerpoint.

Article posted April 24, 2012 at 05:15 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 40



Article posted April 19, 2012 at 06:50 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 48

Me and the three other people in my team decided to see how radishes grow in different lighting. Blacklight (uv- light) VS sunlight. All of us had different ideas on what we thought would happen, all of us exept one thought that they would grow best under the blacklight (uv). The other thought the sunlight would be best. So in the end the blaklight radishes turned out taller but they were droopy and the leafs were different than the sunlight radishes. We belived the blacklight might have made the radishes deformed or messed up. The ones in the sunlight grew really well and bigger and more healthier. Even tho the blacklight/uv-light had smaller wave lenghts, meaning more energy, it still didnt have the healthy growth outcome the sunlight did.



[LINK]

[LINK]

[LINK]

Article posted April 19, 2012 at 06:50 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 48



Article posted May 1, 2012 at 05:04 PM GMT • comment • Reads 44

In my plant experiment we got four cups and put the same amount of dirt in each of them and put the same amount of seeds in each. Our experiment was to see if we could color grass using food coloring and coloring the water. We used the colors blue, green, yellow and our control was regular water. we found that the grass did not change color at all and in fact it slowed the grass growth down because in our control the grass was lush and really tall. In conclusion you cant use food coloring to color grass.

Article posted May 1, 2012 at 05:04 PM GMT • comment • Reads 44



Article posted April 17, 2012 at 05:14 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 49

The last few weeks Olivia, Hollie and I conducted an experiment on how Rye grass grows when watered with cold water, hot water, sugar water and salt water. Our prediction to start off this experiment was that the hot and cold water would continue growth like normal, maybe the hot would grow a bit slower. We expected the salt to not grow at all. We thought that because the plant is a land plant, not living by the sea where salt water is present, therefore it would die. The sugar we expected for the rye grass to grow more than usual, because of added nutrients for the plant. This experiment was our back up plan, because of problems gathering materials for our algae experiment. Now, for our results. The hot and cold water grasses grew normally. Very consistently. The salt and sugar water, didnt grow. At all, throughout our whole experiment! We concluded that temperature does not affect the growth of the rye grass, and that because of osmic pressure in the plant, and in the sugared water, it stunted the growth of the grass. the salt waters sodium took out the plants nutrients, and the bi carbonate messes with the plants ability to use photsynthesis. Causing the plant to die!

Resources:

"Ryegrass." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 04 Oct. 2012. Web. 23 Apr. 2012. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ryegrass>.

Resources:

Article posted April 17, 2012 at 05:14 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 49



Article posted April 17, 2012 at 05:25 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 61

Our experiment was about if plants can grow in a plastic bag as well as out side of it. We took a huge zip lock baggy and set radish seed on a wet paper towel. We had 3 groups of seeds and on one we put 3 drops of red food coloring and on another we put 3 drops of blue food coloring. The 3rd group we left plain. We put the 3 radish seed groups on the wet paper towels in the zip lock baggy and blew it up and closed it. Then left it by the window. They started to grow on the forth day we left them there. Every 3 days we changed the paper towels and didn't add any food coloring. The radishes continued to grow and the red and blue ones ended up having blue viens and red leafs. One mistake we made was we didn't grow any radishes outside of the bag.

Our claim; you can grow plants just as well inside a bag as well as you can outside of one.

Our evidence; the radishes grew fine in the bag, though they took a late start on sprouting. We think this is because they went in actual soil and it took longer to suck the water out if the paper towels.

Our reasoning; they would have grown just as fine as any other radish seeds outside (though we didn't grow any outside of the bag) and grew into beautiful radishes if Alisha didn't leave them in her backpack.



bibliography:



“Greenhouse Gas” Wikipedia, n. d. Web. 25 Apr. 2012.

<[LINK]>.



"The Water Cycle." SouthWest Florida Water Management District , n. d. Web. 25 Apr. 2012. <[LINK]>.





Green house Effect and Global Warming. 2010. Web. 25 Apr 2012. <[LINK]>. <[LINK]>.





Article posted April 17, 2012 at 05:25 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 61



Article posted May 9, 2012 at 07:26 PM GMT • comment • Reads 59

My team tried to get a clock to run off of potatoes(or any kind of tuber). we couldn't get the clock to work so we went on and tried to get a small light to light. we also had a volt meter, and we measured how much power we got. potatoes weren't enough to power much, so we tried yams. we successfully got 4 volts out of the yams but we still couldn't get the light to light. we tried a 1 1/2 volt battery and it light. i don't know why.

Article posted May 9, 2012 at 07:26 PM GMT • comment • Reads 59



Article posted April 17, 2012 at 05:11 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 48

We learned that you can grow Radishes in a bag that will be ready to transplant in as little as two weeks, we also learned that we had a water cycle going and about how greenhouses work.

Our claim is that you can grow radishes just as easily in a bag as you can in soil.

The evidence wew have are a 12 day series of pictures drawn so we could look back and observe the plants growth. We also had evidence of the live plants but they died because they got forgotten.

Our easoning is that our seeds grew just as well in the time allotted as they would have grown in soil and would have produced radishes in as much as 2 months probably less.

I also researched the water cycle so we could see how the water was moving in the bag.



Bibliography: Glencoe science Life science text book published by McGraw company's



And the Merium Webster college dictionary.



Article posted April 17, 2012 at 05:11 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 48



Article posted April 18, 2012 at 07:19 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 43

Me and the three other people in my team decided to see how radishes grow in different lighting. Blacklight (uv- light) VS sunlight. All of us had different ideas on what we thought would happen, all of us exept one thought that they would grow best under the blacklight (uv). The other thought the sunlight would be best. So in the end the blaklight radishes turned out taller but they were droopy and the leafs were different than the sunlight radishes. We belived the blacklight might have made the radishes deformed or messed up. The ones in the sunlight grew really well and bigger and more healthier. Even tho the blacklight/uv-light had smaller wave lenghts, meaning more energy, it still didnt have the healthy growth outcome the sunlight did.



[LINK]

[LINK]

[LINK]

Article posted April 18, 2012 at 07:19 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 43



Article posted April 18, 2012 at 07:24 PM GMT • comment (2) • Reads 138

Me and the three other people in my team decided to see how radishes grow in different lighting. Blacklight (uv- light) VS sunlight. All of us had different ideas on what we thought would happen, all of us exept one thought that they would grow best under the blacklight (uv). The other thought the sunlight would be best. So in the end the blaklight radishes turned out taller but they were droopy and the leafs were different than the sunlight radishes. We belived the blacklight might have made the radishes deformed or messed up. The ones in the sunlight grew really well and bigger and more healthier. Even tho the blacklight/uv-light had smaller wave lenghts, meaning more energy, it still didnt have the healthy growth outcome the sunlight did.



Electromagnetic Spectrum." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 25 Apr. 2012. Web. 25 Apr. 2012. <[LINK]>.



The Spectrum." The Department of Biodiversity & Conservation Biology. Web. 25 Apr. 2012. <[LINK]>.



Radish." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 19 Apr. 2012. Web. 25 Apr. 2012. <[LINK]>.

Article posted April 18, 2012 at 07:24 PM GMT • comment (2) • Reads 138



Article posted April 18, 2012 at 07:22 PM GMT • comment • Reads 55

My team and I came up with an idea that includes fan and light. First they plant the first two seeds and put it in the fan. They also planted rye seeds and put it outside and it did not work and fail. A couple days I planted another rye seeds and put it at the light. We did not plant it in the same day but the seeds that was in the light grew fast and it was healthier than the other ones. The seeds that was at the fan grew but it was not healthy. I know that because of the color. The color of the plant that was at the fan was color yellow green and the plant that was at the light was just green. We did not know what grew first because it was spring break and did not take a look at it for five days and it grew during spring break.

Article posted April 18, 2012 at 07:22 PM GMT • comment • Reads 55



Article posted April 30, 2012 at 07:17 PM GMT • comment • Reads 42

In my plant researched and experiment. Mukda and I did our project on miracle grow and regular soil to see witch soil works better. We planted Ater(15 in each), Forget Me-Nots(10) and Morning Glory(15) in each type of soil. As a result, the regular soil made the plants grow faster. The miracle grow took about a week for the flowers to start to sprout in regular soil.We had thought that the reason why our flowers were growing better in grew better in regular soil was due to the soil that we got from the high shcool green house. We dont know what nutrients and what kind of soil. We did some researched on our flowers structures that we showed in our presentation video. The plants were growing toward the window and the reason why was due to photosynthesis. I learned about how seeds are a living organism and how they aren't.They have the embryo to create plants in the future and seeds have some stred energy in them self ready to be planted and sprout.





Bibliograhy:



"Flowering Plants." Flowering Plants. Web. Mar.-Apr. 2012.



www.leavingbio.net/FLOWERING%20PLANTS.htm



Jeffrey. "What Do Plants Need to Live?" Kid Scientist, 3 Nov. 2007. Web. 07 Apr. 2012. 



kidscientist.com/58/what-do-plants-need-to-live



Pettebone, David. "What Does A Plant Need To Grow." Catalogs.com. Catalogs.com, 2007. Web. 19 Apr. 2012.



www.catalogs.com/info/garden-yard/what-does-a-plant-need-to-grow.html



Carter, J. Stein Stein. "Photosynthesis." Photosynthesis. 1996. Web. 10 Apr. 2012.



biology.clc.uc.edu/courses/bio104/photosyn.htm





 

Article posted April 30, 2012 at 07:17 PM GMT • comment • Reads 42



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