Login
Copyright (c) 2014 by Conditions of Use    Privacy Policy Return to Blogmeister
-- Blogmeister

Sixth grade Science students blogging from the Pacific Northwest in Chimacum, WA!
Mr. G's Blog
Mr. G's Science Facebook Page

by

teacher: Alfonso Gonzalez

Blog Entries
youtuber 01/28/14
09/18/13
My 7 random facts 09/17/13
Silly boy 04/27/12
Caleb 04/25/12
Where i live. 03/13/12
Tempruture 03/01/09
water pollution 10/19/11
Mt. Sant Helens 10/05/11
7 random facts 10/05/11

Title: ()
Description:

Article posted April 21, 2012 at 08:50 PM GMT • comment • Reads 854

salmon threats

Article posted April 21, 2012 at 08:50 PM GMT • comment • Reads 854



Article posted November 30, 2011 at 08:58 PM GMT • comment • Reads 83

   Salmon Cycle:The young salmon fry begin to move in schools and feed in the river. They feed mainly on zooplankton until they grow large enough to eat aquatic insects and other larger foods. Some species of salmon fry, such as chum and pink, start downstream toward the ocean immediately after emerging from the redd; others stay in fresh water for up to three years. Land-locked salmon, such as kokanee, never migrate to the sea but live their entire lives in fresh water.Loss of riparian habitat along streams, rivers, estuaries, and bays is one of the most serious dangers to the wild salmon's survival. Salmon need cool water, bugs to eat, woody debris to hide under, and sediment-free gravel in which to spawn. Riparian habitat along the rivers provide shade which helps keep the water temperature cool throughout the year. Cool, clear water holds lots of oxygen which the salmon also need. Logs, branches, or sticks that fall or hang into the rivers give salmon places to hide and provide food for insects and plants which the salmon feed upon. The roots of trees and bushes also help hold dirt and rocks in place on the bank which reduces sediment runoff. Although logging rules have been revised to protect riparian habitat, previous logging practices have already caused problems. Sometimes little growth was left beside streams and rivers. This resulted in higher water temperatures and increased sediment runoff. Also, without bushes, trees, or woody debris, fish had no place to hide and little food to eat.  As the vulnerable fry grow, they will start to develop spots and vertical parr marks on their sides. These markings help camouflage them from predators such as mergansers and great blue herons. Unlike most fry, pink salmon fry do not develop these parr marks. After the fry have developed distinctive parr marks and are actively feeding in fresh water, they are called parr. This stage is generally reached by the end of the first summer. Most species of salmon parr are about five inches long. They feed mainly on aquatic insects but also eat worms, crustaceans, amphibian larvae, fish eggs.  As the salmon parr begin migrating toward the sea, they will begin the smoltification process. The smoltification process refers to the changes that take place in salmon as they prepare to enter the sea. These changes include the development of the silver color of adults and the tolerance for salt water. As the salmon parr begin migrating toward the sea, they will begin the smoltification process. The smoltification process refers to the changes that take place in salmon as they prepare to enter the sea. These changes include the development of the silver color of adults and the tolerance for salt water. If the salmon parr encounter hydroelectric dams, they must be careful not to be sucked into and crushed in the powerful turbines. These dams and turbines generate electricity for people. The slow-moving lakes behind the dams have little oxygen, delay the migration of salmon, and attract predators in search of easy prey. Some hydroelectric dams have installed screens, channels, and other devices to create systems which help guide young salmon away from dangerous turbines and safely to the river below the dam. These systems are called juvenile fish bypass systems. As the salmon parr pass farms, factories and cities, they may encounter pollution in the water. Sprays and fertilizers that farmers and home owners use sometimes contain toxic substances which wash into rivers, pollute water, and poison fish. The water that runs rapidly off buildings, pavement, and other impermeable surfaces in cities also wash oil, anti-freeze, and other harmful substances into the rivers. Salmon parr may also be sucked into pipes which pump the cool river water into factories to cool machinery. Other pipes pump water out of the rivers for irrigation purposes.By the time the salmon reach the estuaries, they have silver sides, bright bluish green backs, and are called smolt. Here they will undergo osmoregulation. Osmoregulation includes the adaptation of the gills and the kidneys to salt water. After osmoregulation, the salmon head out into the seaThe salmon will feed and grow in the sea for the next one to eight years. They will remain in the sea until they reach full maturity. The salmon will also remain silver in color until they return to their home stream. .During their stay in the sea, the salmon travel hundreds, or even thousands, of miles searching for food and trying to stay out of the mouths of predators. They feed on small fish, shrimp, squid, etc. Orca whales, sea lions, and seals are a few of the natural predators that the salmon meet in the ocean. Humans also like to eat salmon, so commercial fishermen are another threat the salmon face while in the ocean.Depending on their species, mature salmon are anywhere from 14 inches to five feet in length and anywhere from two to 125 pounds in weight. At maturity, the salmon will travel back to the same estuary they visited earlier in their lives. Here they will undergo osmoregulation again to adapt back to fresh water. Once adapted, they will head up river to spawn where they were born.No one knows for sure how the salmon find their way back to the exact stream where they were born. Some scientists think that they can smell differences between the waters of different rivers and that they know where to go by their home stream's particular smell.Once the salmon start upstream toward the spawning grounds, they do not feed but derive energy from stored fats. The distance salmon travel upstream to spawn varies. The average spawning trip distance is about 150 miles. The longest known spawning trip length is from the Bering Sea to Lake Teslin in Canada, a total distance exceeding 2,400 miles and a 2,200 foot elevation gain (Migdalski 116-117).On the way upstream, the salmon face fishermen, fish ladders, waterfalls, and more predators in addition to the challenges they faced on their way downstream earlier in their lives. Humans may have also built more dams or increased river pollution.Although salmon do not feed on their way upstream, they can be caught by skillfully presented fishing tackle. In clear water, where the salmon can be seen, it is not uncommon for a fisherman to present his lure dozens of times before sparking the fish's interest enough to take the offering.Fish ladders are built to provide salmon with a way around hydroelectric dams and other obstructions. They are made of a series of pools arranged in a stair step fashion. Water falls from step to step, and salmon must jump from one pool to the next to reach the top. Salmon must jump up small waterfalls in rivers the same way that they climb fish ladders. Salmon can actually climb waterfalls which are higher than they can jump by swimming and leaping upward through the strong current using their powerful tails.The predators salmon face on their journey upstream include bears, wildcats, and eagles. The bones and scraps of salmon left in the forest by these animals fertilize the forest and help it grow.As the salmon travel upstream, they undergo color changes. The males' silvery colors transform into brilliant colors, probably to attract females. The males also develop hooked snouts to the point of sometimes overlapping the lower jaw and certain species develop humps on their backs. The females also change in color but not to such brilliant shades. Each species has its own spawning colors, which vary from greens and browns to lavenders and dark reds.These physical changes are caused by changes in theLife cycle summary salmon's fat composition, skin pigmentation, blood chemistry, enzymes, and hormones (Steelquist 43). At this stage, they are more susceptible to disease. The news that water flows downhill, and that fish depend on water, won't come as a shock to anyone.



Yet these statements add up to an often-ignored fact about the habitat needs of salmon (and everything else that depends on the river). Salmon don't just live in water--they live in watersheds. From the crest of the surrounding hills to the estuary at the mouth, a river's watershed is the entire basin from which it gathers its waters. As water percolates through the soil to the stream, down the stream to the river, and eventually out to sea, its quality and quantity is affected by everything it touches. Salmon are affected by anything that happens is the watershed, even though it may seemingly take place far from the river.



Salmon are affected by the water's temperature and nutrient content, by the amount of sediment and oxygen it carries, by the rate of its flow, and by other factors. All the natural systems in the watershed--forests, meadows, wetlands, rock outcroppings--contribute to the composition of the water.



The watershed determines the amount and force of the water in the river, and the material carried down by its flow from higher elevations. These factors shape the river bottom, which is another important aspect of salmon habitat. Here, behind a large log, the force of the stream may have dug a deep pool, where young salmon shelter in the summer and returning adults rest on their way to the spawning grounds. There, quiet eddies may have dropped their loads of silt, creating mud which supports a marsh. In another place, the river has deposited beds of gravel, which salmon need for spawning. Some species prefer to lay their eggs in pea-sized gravel, while other can use rocks as large as cantaloupes. The particular types of habitat provided by the river depend on the larger influence of the watershed.



Salmon evolved to cope with a sequence of habitats found in natural watersheds. In a typical river system, tributary streams in the upper reaches are heavily shaded by forests, which drop large quantities of leaf litter and other organic material into the water. Fallen trees in the stream trap spawning gravel on the upstream side, and create plunge pools below where young fish shelter and feed. Many of the aquatic insects available as prey in these areas belong to a group know as "shredders", which devour large bits of plant material floating in the water.



In the middle reaches of the river, the tree canopy opens up and more sunlight falls on the water, prompting algae growth. Here the prey species likely belong to groups know as "scrapers," which harvest algae from the rocks, and "collectors," such as net-spinning caddies fly larvae, which strain finer bits of organic material from the water.



At its lower end, the river may wander in many channels across its floodplain, providing a wealth of fish habitats in its wetlands, sloughs and oxbows. In these marshes and estuaries, ocean-bound salmon gorge on clouds of small crustaceans such as copepods and amphipods.



All human activity in the watershed affects salmon habitat. Timber-cutting, for instance, may remove shade and large streamside logs that once fell periodically into the stream. Road construction and agriculture often cause erosion, which in turn fills the water with sediment that can clog spawning gravel. Culverts can block fish passage and alter water flow. Removing creek meanders or beaver dams and filling wetlands eliminates feeding areas and the slow-water areas so important for sheltering young coho and other salmon from the raging winter currents. Dams can slow the force of the river's flow preventing it from cleansing sediment from its bed and moving gravel downstream.



Because human beings live in watersheds, we are part of the salmon's habitat. In many areas, small landowners, timber companies, fishermen, environmentalists, farmers, tribal members, agency representatives, and others are working together to restore watersheds and improve salmon habitat. Often called watershed, these coalitions are finding ways to put aside differences and pool resources to help the salmon. These groups work together to assess the health of their watershed, identify areas where restoration efforts can best help the salmon, and seek out willing landowners to implement habitat restoration projects.



Projects undertaken by watershed groups have included stream surveys, tree planting (to provide shade along stream banks), road and bank stabilization (to prevent erosion), culvert repair (to facilitate fish passage--for both young and adult fish), placing logs in streams (to create shelter and deep pools), side-channel construction (to provide slow water areas for winter shelter), and cattle watering and fencing (to keep cows and sheep out of streams). Participants have included loggers, fishermen, agency personnel, civic groups, environmentalists, and youth groups ...entire communities, taking responsibility for their watersheds.

Article posted November 30, 2011 at 08:58 PM GMT • comment • Reads 83



Article posted January 4, 2012 at 09:22 PM GMT • comment • Reads 142

There is a very confusing question out there. "Which came first, the chicken or the egg?" Well wouldn't that work with any animal that lays eggs? Of course it would! So I am going to go through the entire salmon life cycle to find out which came first, the salmon or the egg?



The Egg Stage



Salmon eggs are usually a reddish orange color. They have a black dot right in the middle. This is the salmon egg's eye. The mother protects the eggs by digging a hole, like a burrow, called a redd. The eggs are then shielded by a layer of gravel. Eggs are threatened by predators, pollution, high temperature, and gravel disturbance. They need cold water and lots of shade.





Alevin stage



Alevin is the second stage of the salmon life cycle. They are small and have a little sac hanging from their belly. This is a yolk sac. The little fish are fed this through their yolk sac. They are theatened by gulls and other big fish like trout. Alevin need gravel to hide from predators.


src="http://educatoral.com/rm604/images/per5/g1/marcusalevin.jpg" width="400">



Fry Stage



Once salmon hit the fry stage, they start to look like normal fish. They need lots of woody debris to hide under. They also need a cold environment with sediment free gravel. Loss of riparian habitat is a huge threat to salmon. Riparian habitat is The community of plants around water that is concentrated.This is really important to salmon.


src="http://educatoral.com/rm604/images/per5/g1/marcusfry.jpg" width="400">



Parr Stage



The parr stage of the salmon life cycle is an interesting one. They grow black stripes on their backs for camouflage. Parts are threatened by loggers and especially blue heron. They need their parr marks to protect themselves from predators like birds. Parr need lots of food.


src="http://educatoral.com/rm604/images/per5/g1/marcusparr.jpg" width="400">



Smolt Stage



Smolts look almost exactly like parrs exept they don't have parr marks. Smolts are often sucked up in hydroelectric dams. That's why people put up nets to scare the smolts away from the dams. The smolt stage is usually when they start to swim to the ocean, but they can't be exposed to salt. So they start to grow a grey skin color that is salt tolerant.


src="http://educatoral.com/rm604/images/per5/g1/marcussmolt.jpg" width="400">



Adult Stage



The adult stage is the second to last stage of the salmon life cycle. Adults are threatened by orcas and seals, and there is a huge fish out there called white sturgeon and they grow huge by eating tons of salmon. So those are threats too.


src="http://educatoral.com/rm604/images/per5/g1/marcusadult.jpg" width="400">



Spawner Stage



The spawner stage is the last stage of the salmon life cycle. Once they reach the spawner stage their mouths curve upward and they grow sharp teeth to defend their spawning grounds. Once they spawn, they die.


src="http://educatoral.com/rm604/images/per5/g1/marcusspawner.jpg" width="400">



So, I guess, even by going through the entire salmon life cycle, we don't know which came first the salmon or the egg.







Article posted January 4, 2012 at 09:22 PM GMT • comment • Reads 142



Article posted January 23, 2012 at 09:19 PM GMT • comment • Reads 45

fry



discription: the fry is small, it is the third part of  the salmon life cycle and it is a meal for bigger fish



needs: hidding places,food and water



threats: bigger fish, humans and bears

Article posted January 23, 2012 at 09:19 PM GMT • comment • Reads 45



Article posted January 5, 2012 at 09:15 PM GMT • comment • Reads 57

discriptian        this is a egg, it is a start of a fish life cycle, the eggs are red and eggs are delicate.



needs              the needs for eggs are protection, camo so they dont get eaten by preditores. 



threats             the threats are bigger fish, craw fish and humans.



 





 

Article posted January 5, 2012 at 09:15 PM GMT • comment • Reads 57



Article posted January 12, 2012 at 08:56 PM GMT • comment • Reads 50

alvin



discriptions:second part of the fish life cycle, 1 or 2 centemeters long and is food for bigger fish.



needs:food, hiding spots and protection.



threats:humans, bears and bigger fish

Article posted January 12, 2012 at 08:56 PM GMT • comment • Reads 50



Article posted January 4, 2012 at 09:20 PM GMT • comment • Reads 64





An Alevin hatches from a egg and continues to

Grow by using food from the egg yolk.The Alevin

Stays In one spot.....hidden in the gravel.the only

Predator is bigger fish and excessive sedums.

Article posted January 4, 2012 at 09:20 PM GMT • comment • Reads 64



Article posted January 5, 2012 at 08:56 PM GMT • comment • Reads 58





Right after they become a fry they rapidly vibrate their tails,they emerge from the gravel,then push themselves vertically up to the surface of the water. Frys are not

Strong enough to swim up stream so they find cool,

Calm pools to stay. There predators are birds and larger

Fish.

Article posted January 5, 2012 at 08:56 PM GMT • comment • Reads 58



Article posted January 6, 2012 at 09:09 PM GMT • comment • Reads 76





Adult salmon predators well there isn't many. Adult salmon

Go hundreds even thousands of miles searching for food and

Staying away from predators. They feed on small shrimp,small squid etc. Orca whales,sea lions,and seals are there predators.

Article posted January 6, 2012 at 09:09 PM GMT • comment • Reads 76



Article posted January 6, 2012 at 09:18 PM GMT • comment • Reads 68





When the fry gets to be up to 2 inches it is known as a parr. Parr's live in the Same place as they were when it was a

Fry. Predators bigger fish and birds.

Article posted January 6, 2012 at 09:18 PM GMT • comment • Reads 68



Article posted January 6, 2012 at 09:21 PM GMT • comment • Reads 64





The smolts procces marks the beginning of their first

Migration from their stream to the ocean. And at this point

They are loosing their dots and turning a shiny silver. Their

Only predator at this point is surtin birds,really big fish and

Water pollution.

Podcast Play
Podcast Download

Article posted January 6, 2012 at 09:21 PM GMT • comment • Reads 64



Article posted January 9, 2012 at 08:58 PM GMT • comment • Reads 59





Once the salmon start going up stream towards the spawning grounds they do not feed but derive energy from stored fat. While they are on their way they also have to watch out for bears,wild cats and eagles.

Podcast Play
Podcast Download

Article posted January 9, 2012 at 08:58 PM GMT • comment • Reads 59



Article posted January 23, 2012 at 09:11 PM GMT • comment • Reads 80

http://www.cutedaily.com/pocket-pom/ width="400">

Podcast Play
Podcast Download

Article posted January 23, 2012 at 09:11 PM GMT • comment • Reads 80



Article posted December 22, 2011 at 12:22 AM GMT • comment • Reads 62

EGGS



description



the salmon eggs hatch in about 3 months and are laid in reeds made by the female.the eggs are an orangish pink color and about the size of a pencil eraser,they have one eye in the middle of the egg.



threats



the threats are invasive species,disease,freezing,flooding,preditation,high temeratures ,dams,waste,humans,disturbance of gravel,soil eroison etc.



needs



salmon eggs need cool,clean water to survive.Trees and plants along the river provide shade which keeps the water temerature cool enough. The treets and plants along the river also help prevent soil eroison which can sometimes smother the eggs.



picture



 





Article posted December 22, 2011 at 12:22 AM GMT • comment • Reads 62



Article posted January 3, 2012 at 09:04 PM GMT • comment • Reads 49

 



 





 




DESCRIPTION:



alveins have black eyes,their color is about a mix of orange a little bit of red and bluish greenish at the end.



DIET:



 nutrients from yolk sac



THREATS



pollution



humans(dams,waste,etc)



floods




 



 



 

Article posted January 3, 2012 at 09:04 PM GMT • comment • Reads 49



Article posted January 6, 2012 at 09:15 PM GMT • comment • Reads 55

Alvien lose their sacs,and emerge from the gravel as fry in May and June. About an inch (2.5cm) long,they are free swimming,and are easy prey for larger fish. In the river,or a nearby lake,depending on the species, they feed and grow for periods ranging up to a year or more. DESCRIPTION Fry are brow with tiny little black spots and have a hint of silvery white near their eyes.they have black eyes. THREATS Larger fish Humans (dams,waste,etc) Floods Etc.





 

Article posted January 6, 2012 at 09:15 PM GMT • comment • Reads 55



Article posted January 13, 2012 at 09:17 PM GMT • comment • Reads 59

At this point,the juvenile salmon loses its vertical markings on its body and turns a silvery color. Now considered Smolt, they will school together in large groups. It's at this  time that the young salmon will adjust their bodies to saltwater, allowing them to swim out into the Pacific Ocean to feed and grow into salmon.

Article posted January 13, 2012 at 09:17 PM GMT • comment • Reads 59



Article posted January 23, 2012 at 09:03 PM GMT • comment • Reads 185

upon reaching their birth rivers and streams, the adult salmon re-adapt to the fresh water and begin their upstream journey to their natal stream where they were born. At this time, they cease to feed and live on the stores of fat within their bodies. Their upstream journey is a challenging one, swimming upstream against rugged rapids, laeaping over rocky waterfalls, traversing fish ladders, avoiding fisherman nets and hooks, and staying clear of hungry bears. Whey finally reach their natal stream they have reached sexual maturity and are ready to spawn. The female adult clears a spot in the streambed by sweeping her tail back and forth creating a gravel nest that is referred to as a redd. She will then layin this redd and the male adult salmon will fetilize and protect them until both salmon die within a couple of weeks and leave the embryos to fend for themselves.


Article posted January 23, 2012 at 09:03 PM GMT • comment • Reads 185



Article posted January 23, 2012 at 09:22 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 46

Egg

An egg is a red little ball that has a black dot in the middle. The need of a salmon egg is a nice nest on the bottom of the river and pebbles laying on them. The threats are humans, horse back riders, fishermen, loggers and wild animals walking through rivers.



Alevin

It's a fish with the egg still attached to the fish. It needs the egg because thats what it eats when it's hungry. The threat is pollution and a blue heron.



Fry

A fry is a little silver fish that has big eyes. It needs zoo plankton insects cool water shade. The threats of a fry is water pollution and starvation.



Parr

A parr looks like a little fish with stripes. It eats small fish worms and insects. The threat is a blue heron.



Smolt

It's the same as a parr but has green on he's back. It needs small fish and insects. The threat is a blue heron.

Article posted January 23, 2012 at 09:22 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 46



Article posted January 3, 2012 at 09:02 PM GMT • comment • Reads 49





In the nest there is orange pea-sized eggs. The Mother will cover the eggs with gravel this allows water to flow around the eggs and keep them healthy. If you walk in a shallow river you could step on the eggs without knowing. To survive they need cool clean water.

Article posted January 3, 2012 at 09:02 PM GMT • comment • Reads 49



Article posted January 4, 2012 at 09:11 PM GMT • comment • Reads 37





Before the alevin start to get out into the open they survive on there yolk. The yolk will last them a month or so. Once they leave the gravel they become a fry. Threats for both alevin and eggs are : gulls, dippers, sculpins, and trout. People are also big threats.

Article posted January 4, 2012 at 09:11 PM GMT • comment • Reads 37



Article posted January 4, 2012 at 09:21 PM GMT • comment • Reads 41





Fry's start to live in school after awhile. They also start feeding in rivers, mostly on zooplankton until they grow up and start eating aquatic insects. Some fry stay in the river for up three years. But some go to the ocean as soon as they get out of their nest. Loss of riparian habitat along the streams, rivers, estuaries, and bays is one of the biggest dangers. Try's need cool water.



Article posted January 4, 2012 at 09:21 PM GMT • comment • Reads 41



Article posted January 12, 2012 at 09:18 PM GMT • comment • Reads 39





The parr will start going to sea. On their way they will face pollution. They need clean water to make a successful journey downstream. When the salmon reach the estuaries they will start osmoregulation. This is the adaptation of gills and kidneys to salt water. They are now a smolt.

Article posted January 12, 2012 at 09:18 PM GMT • comment • Reads 39



Article posted January 6, 2012 at 09:10 PM GMT • comment • Reads 42





A adult salmon will feed and grow in the ocean for around eight years. They eat shrimp,squid, ect. Orcas, seals, and sea lions are big predators to the adult salmon. Humans also will kill salmon for food. They need to have a food source to survive. After around eight years they will go back to their birth place and spawn.

Article posted January 6, 2012 at 09:10 PM GMT • comment • Reads 42



Article posted January 10, 2012 at 07:33 PM GMT • comment • Reads 51

[LINK]" width="400"



When the fry get parr marks and start feeding in fresh water they are called a parr. The parr eat fish eggs,worms,and crustaceans. They need all of this food to survive. They also need cool water to survive. Bigger fish are big threats to parrs.

Article posted January 10, 2012 at 07:33 PM GMT • comment • Reads 51



Article posted January 23, 2012 at 09:07 PM GMT • comment • Reads 45





When the salmon get back "home" they will start spawning. Then the female lays her eggs. A female may lay 5,000 eggs. Some salmon may survive after laying their eggs but most will die. To lay their eggs they need unpolluted water. A this time the biggest threat to them is dying after spawning.

Article posted January 23, 2012 at 09:07 PM GMT • comment • Reads 45



Article posted January 12, 2012 at 09:21 PM GMT • comment • Reads 62

oh no i hasto rewrite this ALL because it just deleted my work....grrrr.....computer ur so mean......    watever....anyway,



ALEVIN NEEDS:



alevins need several things to survive in the wild.They need a secure place in the rocks to live in.They also need a low current stream,and a cold water temperature.



 



ALEVIN THREATS:



alevins have a wide variety of dangers,since they are so tiny and defenseless.here are a couple.larger fish are a big danger to alevin since they can eat them.gravel falling,can be dangerous because alevins hide between gravel and can be crushed.large animals,can step on them or eat them.humans can pollute the water,step on them,and make the gravel fall.flooding is a problem for them because they can be washed out of the stream.



 



 DESCRIPTION:



Alevins are sorta a transparent-silvery color.They have gold-yellow eyes.



They also have a yolk sack below their body to get their food from.



 



pics 2 come...srry i hasto draw them.....uck!i wil have to over the weekend...

Article posted January 12, 2012 at 09:21 PM GMT • comment • Reads 62



Article posted January 27, 2012 at 08:49 PM GMT • comment • Reads 49

incredibly sorry that i havent been able to finish my salmon assignment lately....i havent had any time on the computer at home,and i am trying to finish homework as well....   :)

Article posted January 27, 2012 at 08:49 PM GMT • comment • Reads 49



Article posted January 12, 2012 at 09:21 PM GMT • comment • Reads 61

Salmon Eggs:

The dangers are people and animals stepping on the redd, dirt getting washed into the redd, horseback riders, fishermen, loggers, livestock or a hiker. The needs are non cold and non polluted water, trees, plants and shade. A description of an egg is it is orange with a black dot in the middle.



Salmon Alevin:

A description of an Alevin is it is one inch in length, it is a mix between clear and orange and it has a yolk sack. It needs it's yolk sack for food. It's dangers are Gulls,dippers, sculpins and trout.



Salmon Fry:

The needs of a fry are zooplankton and shade. The dangers of a fry erosion, no bushes, trees, woody debris, landslides and sediment run off. A fry is shiny silver with a fin at the end and two fins on the top and thie bottom.



Salmon Parr:

A parr is shiny silver with parr marks and it has a back fin and two fins on the top and the bottom. The dangers of a parr are mergansers and great blue heron. The needs of a parr are aquatic insects, worms, amphibian larvae, fish eggs and young fish.



Salmon Smolt:

They are the same as parr but the have blueish green backs.



Adult Salmon:

The dangers of an adult salmon are orca whales, sea lions, seals and commercial fishermen. The needs of an adult salmon are small fish, shrimp and squid. It is silverish green and it has two fins on the top and bottom and it has a back fin.



Spawner Salmon:

The needs and dangers are the same as a adult salmon. A spawner has red all over but it's head part is yellowish brown with a hook type lip.

Article posted January 12, 2012 at 09:21 PM GMT • comment • Reads 61



Article posted January 23, 2012 at 08:51 PM GMT • comment • Reads 50

Eggs






Alevin







Fry







Parr







Smolt







Adult Salmon







Spawner Salmon



Article posted January 23, 2012 at 08:51 PM GMT • comment • Reads 50



Article posted January 4, 2012 at 09:22 PM GMT • comment • Reads 112





EGGS

First, the female salmon digs a shallow nest in the gravel on the river bottom. Then she lays her large pea sized eggs. They need cool clean water to survive. Try not to walk in creeks and rivers because YOU are a threat!

Article posted January 4, 2012 at 09:22 PM GMT • comment • Reads 112



Article posted January 5, 2012 at 09:21 PM GMT • comment • Reads 133





Before the Alevin go into the open they can survive off of their yolk sack for a month. Once they leave the. Gravel they become a fry. They need fresh clean water. The need trees for shade and gravel or another substance to hide so they won't get crushed. Their threats are gulls, dippers, and sculpins.

Article posted January 5, 2012 at 09:21 PM GMT • comment • Reads 133



Article posted January 6, 2012 at 09:21 PM GMT • comment • Reads 125





Salmon Fry



The fry start living in schools and they start feeding into the river. They feed mostly on zooplankton until they're big enough to eat aquatic insects. Some salmon live in the river up to three years. Some go to the river as soon as they leave their nests. Loss of habitat along streams, rivers, and bays is one of their dangers.

Article posted January 6, 2012 at 09:21 PM GMT • comment • Reads 125



Article posted January 6, 2012 at 09:21 PM GMT • comment • Reads 51





Parr

After a while, fry start getting parr marks and feed in fresh water and are called a parr. Parr eat fish eggs, crustaceans, young fish, and worms. It's dangers are gull and other birds of prey. They need non-polluted water.

Article posted January 6, 2012 at 09:21 PM GMT • comment • Reads 51



Article posted January 12, 2012 at 09:18 PM GMT • comment • Reads 51





Adult salmon

Adult salmon feed and grow in the ocean for eight years. They eat shrimp and squid. Orcas, sea lions, and seals are predators to the adult salmon. Humans also kill salmon for food. Then they go back to their birth place and start spawning. They need fresh clean water and they need to be safe!!

Article posted January 12, 2012 at 09:18 PM GMT • comment • Reads 51



Article posted January 13, 2012 at 08:56 PM GMT • comment • Reads 63





Spawning



The spawn go upstream about 150m. When they travel upstream they change colors. Their threats are fisherman, fish ladders and waterfalls. they need the river to be safe for them!

Article posted January 13, 2012 at 08:56 PM GMT • comment • Reads 63



Article posted January 9, 2012 at 09:15 PM GMT • comment • Reads 39

Article posted January 9, 2012 at 09:15 PM GMT • comment • Reads 39



Article posted January 9, 2012 at 09:23 PM GMT • comment • Reads 38

Article posted January 9, 2012 at 09:23 PM GMT • comment • Reads 38



Article posted January 10, 2012 at 07:24 PM GMT • comment • Reads 54

Article posted January 10, 2012 at 07:24 PM GMT • comment • Reads 54



Article posted January 10, 2012 at 07:27 PM GMT • comment • Reads 35

Article posted January 10, 2012 at 07:27 PM GMT • comment • Reads 35



Article posted January 10, 2012 at 07:28 PM GMT • comment • Reads 49

Article posted January 10, 2012 at 07:28 PM GMT • comment • Reads 49



Article posted January 10, 2012 at 07:29 PM GMT • comment • Reads 46

Article posted January 10, 2012 at 07:29 PM GMT • comment • Reads 46



Article posted January 10, 2012 at 07:30 PM GMT • comment • Reads 43

Article posted January 10, 2012 at 07:30 PM GMT • comment • Reads 43



Article posted January 12, 2012 at 09:22 PM GMT • comment • Reads 50

EGGS

The life cycle of the wild salmon begins with the female salmon digging out a shallow redd, or nest, in the gravel on the river bottom. After eggs are fertilized by the male, the female covers the eggs with small to pebble sized gravel. Gravel covering allows water to flow around the eggs and keep them healthy.



Redds are fragile and can easily be destroyed by people or animals crossing the shallow river or by dirt being washed or knocked into the water and smothering the eggs.



Salmon eggs need cool, clean Water to survive. Trees and plants along the side of the river provide shade which keeps the water temperature cool enough for the salmon eggs. Trees and plants also prevent soil erosion which will sometimes smother the eggs.



ALEVIN

The eggs are laid in the fall and hatch the next spring. The small larval fish, about one inch in length are called Alevin and still have a yolk sac attached. The yolk sac contains protein, sugar, minerals, and vitamins. The Alevin live on this "lunch bag" for a month or so before emerging from the gravel and beginning to hunt for food themselves. When the Alevin completely absorbs their yolk sacs, if they leave the gravel before their yolk sac is completely absorbed they are commonly called button-up fry.



Alevin need cold running water that is rich in oxygen and clean gravel that has spaces where the Alevin can hide. Threats include predators in the water, siltation, pollution and floods or other activities that can disturb the gravel can be very harmful, so people can protect the Alevin by keeping dirt or other pollutants out of the water and by staying out of the gravel!



FRY

The young salmon fry begin to move in schools and feed in the river. They feed mainly on zooplankton until they grow large enough to eat aquatic insects and other larger foods. Some species of salmon fry, such as chum and pink, start downstream toward the ocean immediately after emerging from the redd; others stay in fresh water for up to three years. Land-locked salmon, such as Kokanee, never migrate to the sea but live their entire lives in fresh water. Loss Riparian habitat along streams, rivers, estuaries, and bays is one of the most serious dangers to the wild salmons survival.



SMOLT

As the salmon parr begin migrating toward the sea, they will, they will begin the smoltification process. The smoltification process refers to The changes that take place in salmon as they prepare to enter the sea. These changes include the development of the silver color of adults and the tolerance for salt water.



LIFE IN THE SEA

The salmon will feed and grow in the sea for the next one to eight year. They will remain in the sea until they reach full maturity. The salmon will also remain silver color until they return to their home stream.



JOURNEY UPSTREAM

Once the salmon start upstream toward the spawning grounds, Tray do not feed but derive energy from stored fats. The distance salmon travel upstream to spawn varies. The average spawning trip distance is about 150 miles.



Article posted January 12, 2012 at 09:22 PM GMT • comment • Reads 50



Article posted November 29, 2011 at 08:56 PM GMT • comment • Reads 123

The salmon life cycle starts when the salmon spond which is when the salmon lays eggs in a rocky creek or river. Then the eggs hached and go into the ocean. Next they grow into aldults and go back to the stream. Then they lay there eggs and when they go back to the ocean and die.

Article posted November 29, 2011 at 08:56 PM GMT • comment • Reads 123



Article posted January 3, 2012 at 09:08 PM GMT • comment • Reads 48



 Dangers: People can step on them. Eroision can even be a danger because it can bury the eggs. Wild animals are dangerous salmon eggs also. Fisherman, Horseback riders, loggers, livestock, and even the casual hiker can be dangerous to the salmon eggs.



Needs:They nned cool clean water to survive. They also need trees and brush along side of the river to provide shade which keeps the water tempature cool enough for the eggs.The trees and plants also help prevent soil erosion which could sometimes smother the eggs.



Description: Small red round eggs with little black dots (eyes).

Article posted January 3, 2012 at 09:08 PM GMT • comment • Reads 48



Article posted January 4, 2012 at 09:22 PM GMT • comment • Reads 44

Dangers: Spawning Adults, Gulls , Dippers, Sculpins, And Trout all feed upon young Alevin.



Needs: Yolk sac



Discription: Alevins are usually small and a little orange colored. They have a "Yolk sac " on the front of their body kinda below their mouth.  It will feed them for about a month. It contains Protein, Sugar, Minerals, and Vitamins.

Article posted January 4, 2012 at 09:22 PM GMT • comment • Reads 44



Article posted January 12, 2012 at 09:16 PM GMT • comment • Reads 42

Needs: Zooplankton until they grow larger. Then they will need larger aquatic insects.



Dangers: Mergers and great blue herons.



Discription:Fry are small and have tiny goldish lines all the way down their body. They travel in large schools of fish.

Article posted January 12, 2012 at 09:16 PM GMT • comment • Reads 42



Article posted November 29, 2011 at 09:21 PM GMT • comment • Reads 53

EGGS The salmon life cycle starts with the female salmon digging out shallow reed and puts the eggs in there and then the male fertilizes them and then buries them with small pebbles.The young eggs need a clean cool supply of water.The young pee sized eggs have alot of threats such as people walking across them and animals. ALEVIN They hatch in the spring and are about one inch long and have a large yolk sack under there head that gives them nutrients. The alevin dont have near as many threats just bigger fish and other animals. Fry This is the next step in the salmon life cycle and are a little bit larger and dont rely on their yolk sacks anymore and now feed on zooplankton. Their threats now are bigger fish and animals.



Parr This is the next step from fry andstart to grow parr marks that camoflauge them in away from predators.They are about 5 inches long and feed off small bugs and worms.Parr do not have many threats because of the parr marks. Smolt This is the stage when they adapt to salt water.They start to eat shrimp and squid and will live in the sea for 1 to 8 years.Their threats now is a seal whales and other animals.Also the everyday threat, water



pollution. Adult Salmon They weigh 2 to 125 pounds in weight and vary from 14 inches to 5 feet in length. Their threats are seals and whale. They do not need to feed small stuff they feed on the small fish they used to be. They also slowly are adapting back to the fresh water.

Article posted November 29, 2011 at 09:21 PM GMT • comment • Reads 53



Article posted December 6, 2011 at 09:20 PM GMT • comment • Reads 134

the salmon life cycle is a very complicated life cycle. the adults return back to where they were born, and the scientists still dont know how they do it.



Salmon eggs(ova)





the salmon ova hatch in about 3 months. salmon eggs are are laid in gravel nests called redds made by the female(see adult spawner).the eggs are a orangish pink color and about the size of a pencil eraser.if you look at it, you can see the salmon eyes and oragens developing in the ova.



Threats:



disturbance of gravel



invasive species



predetation



high water tempurtures



freezing



suffocation(if the egg is buried)



pollution



flooding



disease



Humans(dams,waste.etc.)



 



salmon alevin





when the baby salmon (alevin) hatches,it has a yolk sac that it feeds off of for about a month. it will hide in gravel until its yolk sac is used up. the alevin cannot swim well because of the yolk sac.



diet:



nutrients from yolk sac



threats:



predators



pollutiuon



floods



humans(dams,waste,etc.)



 



fry





once the yolk sac is used up, the alevin (now called fry) begins to join or start a school.they now feed in rivers and stay in fresh water for 3 years or more (some salmon stay in fresh water their whole lives!) they also grow parr marks on their backs.



diet:



zooplankton



(once colder) aquatic insects



threats:



pollution



predators



invasive species



humans(dams,waste,etc.)



 



parr





basicaly a bigger version of a fry, the parr is six inches long. they feed 1-3 years before their ready to go out to the ocean.



Diet:



(once colder) aquatic insects



zooplankton



threats:



pollution



habitat problems



invasive secies



humans (dams,waste,etc.)



 



Smolt





at this juvenile stage, the smolt lose their parr marks. they turn silvery in color. their bodies get adjusted to saltwater. they will then venture out to sea, where many challenges await.



diet:



insects(including larva),



aquatic invertebrates,



smaller smolt,



crusteaceans



small fish



Threats:



pollution



disease



invasive species



humans (dams, wase,etc.)



ocean conditions



storm water



runoff



pumps



climate



 



Adult





they spend 1 to 4  years eating and living in the sea. once a adult, each specie of salmon develope a different marking. After swimming 2000 miles through the pacific ocean, they return to their birth place to spawn.



Diet:



zoo plankton



smaller fish



krill



invertebrates



Threats:



disase



pollution



invasive species



humans (dams,waste,fishing,etc.)



ocean conditions



storm water



climate change



 



Adult spawner





once upon reaching the river where they were born, they readapt to fresh water. They cease to feed,  and live on fat in their bodies. The female then creates a Redd, or a nest, by sweeping her tail back and forth. She lays the eggs in the redd, and the male protects them until the female and the male die within a couple of weeks, leaving the embryos to fend for themselves.



diet:



nothing (they dont eat)



threats :



same

Article posted December 6, 2011 at 09:20 PM GMT • comment • Reads 134



Article posted December 13, 2011 at 09:19 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 129



The Adult Salmon



the salmon adult livs in the salt water and are mostoften silver. they are 14 in. to 5 ft. long, and are about 2 to 125 pounds in wieght. DANGERS:they have dangers from: Orca whales, Sea lions, and seals are some of its predators. humans are also hunters of salmon. NEEDS: they need small fish, srimp, squid, and other tings to eat.

Article posted December 13, 2011 at 09:19 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 129



Article posted December 7, 2011 at 08:49 PM GMT • comment • Reads 110



The fry



a salmon is a fry when is was an alevin but has used up thier yolk sack. most are silver and they start to move in schools and hunt for themselfs. they eat small insects (macro inverabrates(see blog)) and zoplankton. DANGERS:the danger to them are:having no food, non-cool water, gravel with sediment and many types of birds, and other predators, erosion, and pollution are some of the treats to the frys. NEEDS: they need:food, cool water, sediment-free gravel,trees (for shade and to keepback sediment and help prevent eroision.) and plants.

Article posted December 7, 2011 at 08:49 PM GMT • comment • Reads 110



Article posted December 6, 2011 at 08:58 PM GMT • comment • Reads 117



the eggs of the salmon.



the eggs are orange and have a little black dot in the center.they are laid by a female salmon spawner which creates a shallow pit in the gravel called a redd. the female then lays and fertilezes the eggs, and then covers the eggs with gravel that allows th eggs o still get water. DANGERS: some of the dangers to eggs include: hikers, loggers, fishermen, livestock, and wild animals all somtimes crush or destroy the eggs and/ or the redd. NEEDS: eggs need cool, clean water and tress to provide shade to col down the water and to hold the soil from eroding and smothering the eggs.

Article posted December 6, 2011 at 08:58 PM GMT • comment • Reads 117



Article posted December 6, 2011 at 09:08 PM GMT • comment • Reads 415



The alevin.



the alevin are the stage of when the eggs hatch. there are slightly transparant and come in some differant colors. they have a small yolk sack attched to their upper body. DANGERS: some of the dangers to alevin include: Gulls, Dippers, Sculpins and other predators, and another danger is having no gravel or other substance that they can hide in and being crushed. NEEDS: they need gravel or some other substance to hide them and they also need most of the smae things aas eggs so they need plants to help prevent soil erosion and cool, clean water and trees to provide shade to cool the water, but they dont need food because they have the yolk sack which provides food for about a month.

Article posted December 6, 2011 at 09:08 PM GMT • comment • Reads 415



Article posted December 12, 2011 at 09:23 PM GMT • comment • Reads 89



The parr/smolt



The parr is like a fry but will or has undergone smoltification which gives them a type of camoflauge ( this occurs after a while of traveling downstream). They have also grown to about five inches and are the last stage of the salmon life cycle before they have traveled into the ocean. DANGERS: the dangers to them include: Hydroelectric dams ,gulls and other birds of prey, and pollution from farms, factories, and citys. NEEDS: they need non-polluted water and someway to bypass hydroelectric dams and they need to have undergone osmoregulation


Article posted December 12, 2011 at 09:23 PM GMT • comment • Reads 89



Article posted December 12, 2011 at 09:23 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 128



The Spawner



the spawner are often multi-colored and come in a large variety of colors. this is the stage of thier life where they head back up the stream to lay their own eggs and restart the cycle. DANGERS: dangers to spawners include: fishermen, and predators such as bears, birds, and wildcats, and some of the things they faced going down.NEEDS: they dont really need much but they do need, fishladders to be able to bypass hydroelectric dams, and clear clean water and they can also climb waterfalls to get higher up  the stream.

Article posted December 12, 2011 at 09:23 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 128



Article posted November 30, 2011 at 08:49 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 281

      Salmon Cycle:The young salmon fry begin to move in schools and feed in the river. They feed mainly on zooplankton until they grow large enough to eat aquatic insects and other larger foods. Some species of salmon fry, such as chum and pink, start downstream toward the ocean immediately after emerging from the redd; others stay in fresh water for up to three years. Land-locked salmon, such as kokanee, never migrate to the sea but live their entire lives in fresh water.Loss of riparian habitat along streams, rivers, estuaries, and bays is one of the most serious dangers to the wild salmon's survival. Salmon need cool water, bugs to eat, woody debris to hide under, and sediment-free gravel in which to spawn. Riparian habitat along the rivers provide shade which helps keep the water temperature cool throughout the year. Cool, clear water holds lots of oxygen which the salmon also need. Logs, branches, or sticks that fall or hang into the rivers give salmon places to hide and provide food for insects and plants which the salmon feed upon. The roots of trees and bushes also help hold dirt and rocks in place on the bank which reduces sediment runoff.

Although logging rules have been revised to protect riparian habitat, previous logging practices have already caused problems. Sometimes little growth was left beside streams and rivers. This resulted in higher water temperatures and increased sediment runoff. Also, without bushes, trees, or woody debris, fish had no place to hide and little food to eat. 

As the vulnerable fry grow, they will start to develop spots and vertical parr marks on their sides. These markings help camouflage them from predators such as mergansers and great blue herons. Unlike most fry, pink salmon fry do not develop these parr marks.

After the fry have developed distinctive parr marks and are actively feeding in fresh water, they are called parr. This stage is generally reached by the end of the first summer. Most species of salmon parr are about five inches long. They feed mainly on aquatic insects but also eat worms, crustaceans, amphibian larvae, fish eggs.The news that water flows downhill, and that fish depend on water, won't come as a shock to anyone.



Yet these statements add up to an often-ignored fact about the habitat needs of salmon (and everything else that depends on the river). Salmon don't just live in water--they live in watersheds. From the crest of the surrounding hills to the estuary at the mouth, a river's watershed is the entire basin from which it gathers its waters. As water percolates through the soil to the stream, down the stream to the river, and eventually out to sea, its quality and quantity is affected by everything it touches. Salmon are affected by anything that happens is the watershed, even though it may seemingly take place far from the river.



Salmon are affected by the water's temperature and nutrient content, by the amount of sediment and oxygen it carries, by the rate of its flow, and by other factors. All the natural systems in the watershed--forests, meadows, wetlands, rock outcroppings--contribute to the composition of the water.



The watershed determines the amount and force of the water in the river, and the material carried down by its flow from higher elevations. These factors shape the river bottom, which is another important aspect of salmon habitat. Here, behind a large log, the force of the stream may have dug a deep pool, where young salmon shelter in the summer and returning adults rest on their way to the spawning grounds. There, quiet eddies may have dropped their loads of silt, creating mud which supports a marsh. In another place, the river has deposited beds of gravel, which salmon need for spawning. Some species prefer to lay their eggs in pea-sized gravel, while other can use rocks as large as cantaloupes. The particular types of habitat provided by the river depend on the larger influence of the watershed.



Salmon evolved to cope with a sequence of habitats found in natural watersheds. In a typical river system, tributary streams in the upper reaches are heavily shaded by forests, which drop large quantities of leaf litter and other organic material into the water. Fallen trees in the stream trap spawning gravel on the upstream side, and create plunge pools below where young fish shelter and feed. Many of the aquatic insects available as prey in these areas belong to a group know as "shredders", which devour large bits of plant material floating in the water.



In the middle reaches of the river, the tree canopy opens up and more sunlight falls on the water, prompting algae growth. Here the prey species likely belong to groups know as "scrapers," which harvest algae from the rocks, and "collectors," such as net-spinning caddies fly larvae, which strain finer bits of organic material from the water.



At its lower end, the river may wander in many channels across its floodplain, providing a wealth of fish habitats in its wetlands, sloughs and oxbows. In these marshes and estuaries, ocean-bound salmon gorge on clouds of small crustaceans such as copepods and amphipods.



All human activity in the watershed affects salmon habitat. Timber-cutting, for instance, may remove shade and large streamside logs that once fell periodically into the stream. Road construction and agriculture often cause erosion, which in turn fills the water with sediment that can clog spawning gravel. Culverts can block fish passage and alter water flow. Removing creek meanders or beaver dams and filling wetlands eliminates feeding areas and the slow-water areas so important for sheltering young coho and other salmon from the raging winter currents. Dams can slow the force of the river's flow preventing it from cleansing sediment from its bed and moving gravel downstream.



Because human beings live in watersheds, we are part of the salmon's habitat. In many areas, small landowners, timber companies, fishermen, environmentalists, farmers, tribal members, agency representatives, and others are working together to restore watersheds and improve salmon habitat. Often called watershed, these coalitions are finding ways to put aside differences and pool resources to help the salmon. These groups work together to assess the health of their watershed, identify areas where restoration efforts can best help the salmon, and seek out willing landowners to implement habitat restoration projects.



Projects undertaken by watershed groups have included stream surveys, tree planting (to provide shade along stream banks), road and bank stabilization (to prevent erosion), culvert repair (to facilitate fish passage--for both young and adult fish), placing logs in streams (to create shelter and deep pools), side-channel construction (to provide slow water areas for winter shelter), and cattle watering and fencing (to keep cows and sheep out of streams). Participants have included loggers, fishermen, agency personnel, civic groups, environmentalists, and youth groups ...entire communities, taking responsibility for their watersheds.

Article posted November 30, 2011 at 08:49 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 281



Article posted December 1, 2011 at 04:33 PM GMT • comment • Reads 44

this is something about salmon. its gonna be kinda boring, but, but, but, read it anyway.

so first the salmon are born. they come out of eggs. they are usually reddish pinkish.



See? Salmon eggs! Oh and here is a link 4 a real salmon egg pic!

http://www.seymoursalmon.com/images/lifecycle/eggs.jpg

And thats a good picture.

Anyway, then they hatch into alevin. I know, wierd name. But thats what its called. The alevin have a yolk sack attached to them, and (its really wierd.) the yolk sack stays for a few weeks. While the yolk sack is still not absorbed, the salmon stay in the gravel. When its gone, the alevin come out and they are fry now.and here is a pic of alevin!




and here is a pic on a website!!

http://www.seymoursalmon.com/images/lifecycle/alevin.jpg

now about fry!fry immedietly start looking for food, because they have no yolk sack left. yes this is yukky, but they eat their dead parents. eeew. oh and plus bugs. teeny bugs.

Article posted December 1, 2011 at 04:33 PM GMT • comment • Reads 44



Article posted January 3, 2012 at 04:03 PM GMT • comment • Reads 48



Salmon eggs are very fragile so many things can threaten them at this state .for example: gravel erosion ,humans ,floods, ext.



Alvin are the second stage of the life cycle.they do not get food but they do feed of a feed sack for a few months.they are still very fragile and can not fend for themselves.



salmon are now on their third stage.at this stage they are getting their own food for their food sack has run out.they also travel in schools of other fry.



After being a fry they are now smolts .during this part of their life they mostly changing their body's to adapt to being able to living in the ocean.



(sorry it's sideways) Adult salmon will live in the ocean for 1-8 years And will stay there until fully matured.They will remain silver until returning home to spawn.



At this stage the salmon are only trying to survive till they have laid their eggs.once they have been laid they soon die leaving the eggs to fend for themselves .

Article posted January 3, 2012 at 04:03 PM GMT • comment • Reads 48



Article posted November 28, 2011 at 03:56 PM GMT • comment • Reads 110

http://www.piscestt.com/pisces/virtualtours/pics/alevin11.jpg

Article posted November 28, 2011 at 03:56 PM GMT • comment • Reads 110



Article posted November 29, 2011 at 03:58 PM GMT • comment • Reads 108

http://www.pixdatabase.com/data/r/o/l/rolljack/medium/1509-salmon-fry-s3.jpg

Article posted November 29, 2011 at 03:58 PM GMT • comment • Reads 108



Article posted November 29, 2011 at 04:27 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 140

https://room211.wikispaces.com/file/view/Chinook_Salmon.gif/32760431/Chinook_Salmon.gif

Article posted November 29, 2011 at 04:27 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 140



Article posted November 22, 2011 at 04:09 PM GMT • comment • Reads 341

Hello mai pies!



In this blog you will get information on the salmon life cycle!



 





photo


 


This is a picture of salmon eggs.(I could not find any pictures of eggs in a nest,sorry.)So any way if these eggs were in thier natural habitat the nest they would be in would be called a redd.


A hiker,horse back riders,anything that can walk over a nest really.


 




This is a picture of salmon Alevin. They require cold, clear, oxygen rich water at this stage of life. They stay in the creek or river around their redd becuase they like calm water to collect their food. Would you like being thrown around when you tried to have dinner?

 



Excessive sediment in water is one of the greatest dangers to salmon at this stage. It can reduce oxygen levels in the water! (that means dead fishy-fishy XD) Salmon parr have vertical marks on their skin. They are known as parr when they are over a year old. They stay in the river or creek they are born in until they are old enough to leave. They stay in the creek or river and eat aquatic bugs and worms. They have the danger of being thrown around if they leave calm water.



 



(NOTE:the information you are about to read was found on http://cybersalmon.fws.gov/chum.htm. It is about Chum salmon. Not all salmon have the same smoltification process.)



Many changes occur when young salmon are smolt. They lose their parr marks and get a new pattern. They get a pattern that is light on the bottom and dark on the top. They have such a short freshwater period, the smoltification process is not as pronounced as other species of salmon. (It is not very flashy. I said that for the pies that don't know the other meaning of pronounced. -.-)



 



(NOTE:The information in this paragragh and the next one are from this website: http://cybersalmon.fws.gov/chum.htm.)



Most Alaskan Chum salmon stay in the ocean for 2-5 years. Their primary diet consits of copepods,fish,mollusks,squid and tunicates. They near spawning stage at 3-6 years old. The dangers of this stage is that fishrmen can catch you in their nets.



 



As you know now, the Chum salmon return to the place in the river or creek they were born in to spawn.

Female salmon make the redd and she mates with a male salmon. When she lays her eggs in the nest, she covers them in rocks and pebbles.

After the salmon mate and lay their eggs they die from malnutrition and weakness.

The salmon life cycle repeats for the eggs.





Fruitpie-chan

Article posted November 22, 2011 at 04:09 PM GMT • comment • Reads 341



Article posted November 21, 2011 at 04:30 PM GMT • comment (5) • Reads 110



The life cycle of the wild salmon begins with the female salmon digging out a shallow redd,or nest,in the gravel in the river bottom.



The eggs that are laid in the fall hatch the next spring.the small larval fish,about one inch in length,are called alevin,and still have a yolk sac attached.The threats are horseback riders, fishermen, loggers, livestock, wild animals, or just the casual hiker can all accidentally destroy salmon redds without even realizing it. Gulls, dippers, sculpins, and trout all feed upon salmon eggs and young alevin.



The young salmon fry begin to move in schools and feed in the river.they mainly on zooplankton until they grow large enough to eat aquatic insects and other larger foods.the need is cool, clear, water holds lots of oxygen which the salmon also need.the danger is as the vulnerable fry grow, they will start to develop spots and vertical parr marks on their sides. These markings help camouflage them from predators such as mergansers, and great blue herons. Unlike most fry, pink salmon fry do not develop these parr marks.



By the time the salmon reach the estuaries,they have silver sides,bright bluish green backs,and are called smolt. The danger is hydraulic dams and pollution from farms, factories, and cities, the needs are clean water for oxygen and tall trees to shade parts of the stream.



During their stay in the sea,the salmon travel hundreds,or even thousand,of miles searching for food and trying to stay out of the mouths of predators.their needs are shrimp, and squid, to eat.



Once the salmon start upstream toward the spawning grounds,they do not feed but service energy from stored fats.the dangers are bear, coon, and sport fishermen.the needs are less water pollution less bears and less coons and loose gravel. 



The salmon that make it back to their home streams to spawn have beaten amazing odds.on average, out of every 1,000 eggs laid

 One survives to return and spawn.The dangers are diving birds king fishers and bears. The needs are loose gravel cool clean oxygenated water.

Article posted November 21, 2011 at 04:30 PM GMT • comment (5) • Reads 110



Article posted January 30, 2012 at 09:06 PM GMT • comment • Reads 88

Article posted January 30, 2012 at 09:06 PM GMT • comment • Reads 88



Article posted November 29, 2011 at 04:11 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 88

[LINK]" target="_blank">[LINK]">Salmon Life Cycle

Article posted November 29, 2011 at 04:11 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 88



Article posted January 3, 2012 at 09:00 PM GMT • comment • Reads 67

the salmon travel hundreds even thousands of miles looking for food in the sea they are looking for food so they can have energy so the do not git eten bye wales other fish and when they are in the rivers the bares eat them. salmon eat shrimp little fish like fry.

Article posted January 3, 2012 at 09:00 PM GMT • comment • Reads 67



Article posted January 4, 2012 at 09:12 PM GMT • comment • Reads 68

Here is a salmon spawner. descriptions,a salmon swims about 100 miles looking for food so they can have energy so they don't get eaten be predators. the salmon needs food water place to hide. salmon have to hide from wales other fish and octopus. 



Article posted January 4, 2012 at 09:12 PM GMT • comment • Reads 68



Login
Copyright (c) 2014 by Conditions of Use    Privacy Policy Return to Blogmeister