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Sixth grade Science students blogging from the Pacific Northwest in Chimacum, WA!
Mr. G's Blog
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by teacher: Alfonso Gonzalez
Blog Entries

Article posted June 11, 2012 at 08:21 PM GMT • comment • Reads 261

The highest number of washers lifted in period 5 was 9 washers. The configuration that would lift the most washers would be: using 3 batteries in a series order, 2 wires, short string, and, not completely sure yet, a nail, not pulley.

Article posted June 11, 2012 at 08:21 PM GMT • comment • Reads 261



Article posted May 16, 2012 at 08:11 PM GMT • comment • Reads 299

I learned that friction is a force that happens when two objects rub together. Without friction there would be nothing to stop us from sliding all over the place.

We used a 10/2.5 newton scale to measure the friction force of a wood block and 5 different surface types. I learned from inquiry 6.1 that the force of friction is different when something is dragged across different surfaces.

From inquiry 6.2 I learned that the weight you pull across a surface, the friction force there is. We dragged a block across one particular but, this time we changed the weight that we dragged across the surface. In conclusion, the more weight= the more friction.

From inquiry 6.3 I learned that if something has a smaller surface area with the same weight the smaller surface area has more friction force. For this experiment, we used on block but changed the surface area. The smaller surface area had more friction force.

FRICTION IS FUN=http://=http://=http://=http://=http://=http://!!!

Article posted May 16, 2012 at 08:11 PM GMT • comment • Reads 299



Article posted April 18, 2012 at 07:58 PM GMT • comment • Reads 263

I learned that today we are using more energy than we used in 2010.



Insulation helps conserve energy so the energy doesn't leak.



you can be safe with electricity by making sure that when you plug something into an outlet, plug it in all the way so none of the metal is touchable.

Article posted April 18, 2012 at 07:58 PM GMT • comment • Reads 263



Article posted March 21, 2012 at 08:23 PM GMT • comment • Reads 47

When it comes to batteries, there are more than one type of energy. Usually people think that batteries generate electricity, but they're wrong. When a battery is charged, it has stored chemical energy. But when it generates energy into a device, such as a battery, it turns into electrical energy. There are things called electrodes, which are the metal parts on the ends of the battery, that let the electrons run around the circuit enableing the device to work. That is the main idea of batteries.

Article posted March 21, 2012 at 08:23 PM GMT • comment • Reads 47



Article posted March 13, 2012 at 09:23 PM GMT • comment • Reads 44

I live in a town called Chimacum. Well, actually I live in Port Ludlow, a place right next to it, but I go to school in Chimacum. Our town is very small, and I really don't understand why the only school around is in the smallest town in the area. Port Hadlock, Irondale, and Port Ludlow are all bigger than Chimacum but the only school is here in Chimacum. We have a creek right by our school that we test water quality with. Chimacum is a farming town with lots and lots of farms. It takes a while for me, living in Port Ludlow, to get to Chimacum, but at least we know that we'll never run out of local foods!

Article posted March 13, 2012 at 09:23 PM GMT • comment • Reads 44



Article posted March 13, 2012 at 09:08 PM GMT • comment • Reads 262

I know that for batteries to work it needs a complete energy circuit. They power most electronic things. Some can be recharged and some can't. I'd like to learn how to make a battery and how they can transfer energy from natural things to electricity.

Article posted March 13, 2012 at 09:08 PM GMT • comment • Reads 262



Article posted March 2, 2012 at 09:05 PM GMT • comment • Reads 46

Article posted March 2, 2012 at 09:05 PM GMT • comment • Reads 46



Article posted February 29, 2012 at 09:26 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 42

Roses are red, violets are blue, our creek is clean, clear, and cool. Nitrates, Ph and others like DO, lead us to one thing that all of us know. Chimacum Creek is doing great, so jump off your chair and celebrate!!!



That's right Chimacum Creek is absolutely great! If you don't believe so, I'll prove it to you. All the sixth graders in Chimacum divided into water quality jobs and gathered this data:



DO ( disolved oxygen ) average= 8.125 mg/l which is not too high or too low



Ph ( positive hydrogen ) average= 6 which means that our creek is almost pure but slightly acidic.



Turbidity average= 44.7 NTU which means our creek is clear.



Nitrates average= 0.3 mg/l which means that there is enough nitrates for algae to grow but not enough for fish to be effected.



Ammonium average= 1.6 mg/l which is the only average here that is bad.



Flow rate average= 1972.8 gal/s which is slow enough for fish to rest but fast enough for the algae to not grow super big.



Temperature average= 31.13 dergrees F which means the creek is cool. ( As in cold ).



This data proves that Chimacum Creek is doing well. And if this still doesn't convince you, that data is backed by our benthic macros research.



Jac and Aliina from the North Pacific Salmon Collition brought in water samples from the creek that had a bunch of bugs in it. A tool on the moodle showed us a chart of what bugs are tolerant and sensitive. We identified many mayflies which are very sensitive. That means that our creek is clean enough to be home to very sensitive bugs.



So, all of this years water quality research has totally paid off, it lets us know that Chimacum Creek is doing awesome. But, just because we know that the creek is clean and healthy, doesn't mean we can take it lightly. We still need to make sure it stays clean. So please stop doing anything that might pollute it, even litering on land can effect the creek.

Article posted February 29, 2012 at 09:26 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 42



Article posted February 10, 2012 at 09:20 PM GMT • comment • Reads 46

This is the nitrates data that the nitrates people all the way from 2002 through 2011 gathered. It takes a pretty big drop at the begining, then it stays the same for a while, and then takes a huge incline. This tells us that the nitrates level has dropped and risen over the past 10 years.



 

Article posted February 10, 2012 at 09:20 PM GMT • comment • Reads 46



Article posted January 27, 2012 at 08:54 PM GMT • comment • Reads 46

As everybody knows, the whole 6th grade went on a field trip to Snow Creek to plant trees. But our field trip wouldn't have happened without Jac, Aliina, and all of the volunteers from the North Pacific Salmon Collition. I'd like to give a special thanks to my volunteer. THANK YOU SO MUCH CHAWSEE!

Article posted January 27, 2012 at 08:54 PM GMT • comment • Reads 46



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