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2011-2012

All the students in room 15 teach and learn from each other. The challenges that are achieved are limited only by the restrictions of their own minds!

by Mandarin

teacher: Michael La Marr

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Article posted May 3, 2012 at 06:43 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 57

The Pony Express



On our field trip to Old Sacramento, I learned about the Pony Express. The Pony Express was a system to deliver mail in 10 days. The rides to deliver the mail were hard and dangerous. The men who rode the ponies were young. Working for the Pony Express was a big risk.



The Pony Express asked for skinny boys who were from the ages of 12 to 18 years old. They preferred orphans because if a boy died, then his parents wouldn’t be sad. Each boy was given a gun to defend himself because he would ride through dangerous Native American territory. They wore skin-tight clothes to reduce friction in order to move faster. The ponies wore mochilas, which carried up to 20 pounds of letters.



Each rider would ride his pony for 10 miles, and then he would stop at a station. At a station, the pony would be given water, and then another pony would replace it. That pony would ride 10 miles, and the process would keep repeating until the rider had ridden for 75 miles. After the rider rode 75 miles, he would stop at a home station to rest. A different rider would replace that rider, and the process would keep repeating until the mail was delivered to its destination.



Later, the telegraph was invented. The telegraph sent messages faster than the Pony Express. At the time the Pony Express was losing money because it was too costly. It also didn’t improve transportation either. Two days later, the Pony Express was shut down. Even though the Pony Express was shut down, it was a memorable company that will be remembered in Californian history.

Article posted May 3, 2012 at 06:43 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 57



Article posted April 24, 2012 at 05:54 PM GMT0 • comment (2) • Reads 73

Westminster Woods Poetry





Sea Star

Vibrant, ridged, rough,

Sea Star



Hiking

Brisk, vigorous, breath taking,

Hiking



Night

Mysterious, dark,

Freezing, frightening, blackening,

Dark of Night,

Twilight



Creek

Cold, watery,

Rushing, pouring, flowing,

Natural Pathway of Water

Watershed



Rain

Cold, misty,

Pouring, dropping, drizzling,

Water, droplets, heat, fire,

Warming, comforting, brightening,

Light, dancing

Campfire



Night Hike

The faint figures moving in the darkness,

The sound of my feet crunching the ground below me,

The fine drops of rain,

The cold air of the night,

The mossy trees.

Article posted April 24, 2012 at 05:54 PM GMT0 • comment (2) • Reads 73



Article posted January 24, 2012 at 07:22 PM GMT0 • comment (2) • Reads 189

The Terrible Wave



Marden Dahlstedt’s writing is extremely descriptive. Marden Dahlstedt’s story is about Megan Maxwell who gets hit by the “Terrible Wave.” The descriptive part about her writing is that she writes as if she is Megan Maxwell. The words and quotes that Ms. Dahlstedt uses are so strong that she can paint a picture in my mind of what’s happening in the story.



Ms. Dahlstedt’s writing is also unexpected and surprising. Ms. Dahlstedt wrote things that were completely unexpected such as this quote, “…they saw the head of a child. For one horrible moment, it looked as if it had been severed...” Although the wave was so strong that it could sever body parts, in the book it turned out that there was not a boy’s head there. It was a live, whole boy.



Overall I think Ms. Dahlstedt is a very creative writer. She wrote of the Johnstown flood so greatly. In my opinion I think that the best quote in the story was, “The two rivers, swollen and choked with debris, churned towards the stone bridge.” That was the best quote because Ms. Dahlstedt used personification. I can imagine what the rivers look like in my head. Ms. Dahlstedt incorporates realistic writing into the “Terrible Wave” which makes her writing sensational.

Article posted January 24, 2012 at 07:22 PM GMT0 • comment (2) • Reads 189



Article posted December 9, 2011 at 08:52 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 180

The most important event that led the United States to where it is today was the joining of California to the United States. The joining of California to the United States happened because of the building of the missions, which were built by Spanish settlers to settle California. The missions were overthrown. American settlers eventually came to California. Those events lead to the Bear Flag Revolt, which led to war with Mexico, which lead to California becoming a part of the United States because of the signing of the Treaty of Guadalupe Vallejo.



American settlers started coming to California to find wealth and opportunities. John C. Fremont came to California and met with Colonel Jose Castro. Jose Castro ordered Fremont out of California. Fremont left but came back later. Fremont spread rumors to the American settlers that they would all be ordered out of California. This led to Fremont encouraging the settlers to rebel. They started the Bear Flag Revolt in Sonoma. This happened at Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo’s house. He was held prisoner a Sutter’s Fort.



The Bear Flag rebels didn’t know that the United States had already gone to war with Mexico. The Californios attacked with rifles, wooden lances, and a cannon. The Californios won the battles, but the United States won the war due to more ammunition. So the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo was created. The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo was signed in the town of Guadalupe Hidalgo. The treaty ensured that all of the Californio’s rights were preserved, but the United States got 525,000 square acres of land if they paid $15,000,000. California continued to grow, until, James Marshall discovered gold. California experienced the “ Gold Rush.” The Gold Rush led to statehood.

Article posted December 9, 2011 at 08:52 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 180



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