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2011-2012

All the students in room 15 teach and learn from each other. The challenges that are achieved are limited only by the restrictions of their own minds!

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teacher: Michael La Marr

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Title: The Terrible Wave (01/08/12)
Description: We have been reading The Terrible Wave and have been paying attention to the descriptive writing of the author, Marden Dahlstedt. What is your opinion of her writing? This is your opportunity to tell everyone what you think about the writing in The Terrible Wave.

In this blog, you will need to state your opinion and then support it with examples. Quoted passages from the book are a great way to support your ideas. Be sure to develop a strong body of writing that proves your opinion. You also need a solid conclusion to restate your thoughts. As always, good spelling and conventions are a must!

Be sure to check the rubric to see how you will be scored. This writing should be published by January 27.

terriblewave

Article posted February 8, 2012 at 06:09 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 486

I think Marden Dahlstedt’s writing in The Terrible Wave is interesting and fun at the same time. Most books’ writings only have one word to describe all the events like deadly, dangerous, scary, weird, breathtaking, and even exciting. Dahlstedt creates the story in the reader’s head. I think that it is impossible to find a book that gives the reader a better picture in his/her head.



Marden Dahlstedt’s writing is awesome to read due to all the descriptive writing she puts in it. She adds very interesting sentences like, “Megan felt herself being pushed, as if by a mighty hand, through the jagged crack between darkness and light,” and "Gasping, Megan saw the great dark bulk of a horse, slack and floating on its side, its large, soft eyes staring sightlessly into the rain.” Those quotes are just some of her normal work. These quotes happened when Megan was floating on a mattress that she landed on after getting shot into the air from the pressure of the water, from the enormous amount of water heading her way, going through her house. Some other fantastic quotes are, "The trunk of a giant tree came rushing past, its roots waving above the water like a hundred searching fingers,” and "A piano drifted by her, its white keys looking like a great grinning mouth.” Notice all the descriptive detail that she adds. Those quotes take place in the same time period as the first quotes did. Those are my favorite sentences so far in the The Terrible Wave.



Marden Dahlstedt’s writing is awesome! Her writing is remarkable because she knows exactly what I want to read before I even find out. It’s like she is reading my mind. I guarantee her writing is the best in the universe because she can make a boring and sad story into a thrilling, risk taking adventure. That is THE TRUTH, about Marden Dahlstedt’s writing in The Terrible Wave.

Article posted February 8, 2012 at 06:09 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 486



Article posted February 1, 2012 at 06:24 PM GMT0 • comment (2) • Reads 109

What I Think About The Terrible Wave





I think the author of The Terrible Wave MARDEN Dahlstedt, made her book very interesting and detailed. A really good detail is when the main character was describing how it was on the mattress that she fell on when the wave hit. She talked about how it felt being all alone on a mattress with water hitting her. “It was an entirely unhuman sound – cracking, grinding, roaring, together with the dreadful sucking, sloshing noise of the dark water which surrounded her.” Another sentence that I liked was when she was still on a mattress and all the sounds and sights she experienced. Dahlsedt wrote, “The mattress was floating on a sea of fearfully churning dark water that seemed to stretch out in all directions.” I liked it because it was very detailed and seemed real. When Dahlstedt made the main character, Megan, meet Brian O’ Meara, they were talking like in a normal day, but it was the one of the world’s greatest disasters. One of my favorite sentences is when Daisy chortled, “Ohhh . . . you look like three pigs in a mud wallow.” Then anger flashed through Megan hot and fierce. She jumped to her feet and said “Oh you make me sick! ” then she added, “I didn’t see you doing anything to help!” That is one of my favorites because it is a little bit weird that Megan was about to die by falling in the drifting water and Daisy just laughed. Dahlstedt made the book so detailed and interesting; it seemed as if I was in the book.

Article posted February 1, 2012 at 06:24 PM GMT0 • comment (2) • Reads 109



Article posted February 1, 2012 at 06:23 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 961

My opinion of The Terrible Wave is that I think this book is very descriptive, interesting, and can effect other people’s feelings. An example of this writing being descriptive is; “Gasping, Megan clutched for the high side and crawled slowly across the spongy mass.” At that time Megan Maxwell was on a sodden mattress floating through the destroyed city of Johnstown because her house got broken down when the terrible wave hit.



The next example was that the writing was very, very, very interesting. Some of the phrases can affect other people’s feelings, like feeling empathy for some of the characters. In this book I think people would feel a lot of empathy for the characters because this book is based on one of the world’s most greatest natural disasters! Many people died and a lot were homeless. Many lost parts or all of his or her families.



Also Marden Dahlstedt uses a lot of personification which makes the book interesting, descriptive and dramatic. Personification is when authors give non human objects human qualities. For example: a sincere black mist. How could a mist be sincere? This is an example of personification.



Some of the characters have some very interesting names you may have never even heard of, for example Septimus Shaw, Daisy Cox, Brian O’Maera and Hulda. I really like the names that Marden Dahlstedt used because they sound interesting, unusual, and very cool.



Many important life lessons could be learned from this book. This exciting, interesting, and touching story would teach children and adults of all ages to help when you can, and compromise! Marden Dahlstedt is a great author; her books are full of magnificent adventures about real life events and people!



The author’s writing style fascinates me. Her stories make me seem that I am a part of them!!!! But also this story is so sad, I remember that Marden Dahlstedt wrote that after the wave hit the characters they discovered that more than 2,000 people were dead. This statement caused me to think that maybe the characters family members are dead! This horrible wall of water hit Johnstown in 1889 breaking and killing everything in its path, destroying and wiping the peaceful town of Johnstown completely away!!



I am so, so glad that I wasn’t there! This flood is considered one of the greatest natural disasters! This is a touching story of a fifteen year old girl who discovers what it s like to experience a full scale disaster!



All in all think The Terrible Wave is an awesome book, and if anyone asked, I would recomend it to evry person in the world! In this book there are adventures, more adventurous than any adventure in the world!

Article posted February 1, 2012 at 06:23 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 961



Article posted January 31, 2012 at 08:59 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 226

The Terrible Wave



I love how Marden Dahlstedt just makes the simplest thing sound so intriguing in her book, “The Terrible Wave.” I like how she writes with so much excitement. An example of something that is intriguing is how she said, “… shrouded in mist…” instead of, “…surrounded in mist…” That was a part when the main characters were floating on a farm wagon looking around town after the wave had hit, and they see some buildings shrouded in mist. She also makes things very exciting like, “… evil water surged about her,” This was when Megan was still in the floodwater and not yet on the mattress. But she could have said something dull like, “… the water was around her…” I also love how she gave fire some personification like “… tongues of flames, eating the sky.” Instead of “… fire in the sky.”



I also love that Dahlstedt gives such detailed pictures just waiting to be created in the heads of people who read the book. She wrote, “...piles of boards and bricks that had once been houses.” This was when the group was looking around Johnstown after most of the characters recovered from the wave that had hit. To me it’s as if it were real in my head, and I can just imagine how awful the scene must have been, with all those jagged and broken boards, and the bricks that had been thrown around. I think Dahlstedt was right on when she uses descriptors to tell the reader how the character is speaking. In this example, Megan had just thrown up, “I’m all right now” she said faintly “I’m sorry.... Let’s go on....” The faintly part gives me such a better image of how Megan said that. Somehow the faintly part makes her seem sort of down or embarrassed or maybe even having a lighter tone than usual.

I like all these examples. I like them because they seem so interesting and are a lot more detailed then how it could be. Dahlstedt also puts the perfect amount of detail in her writing, and I really don’t like reading books but every time I had to stop at a chapter, I’d wished I could read more.

Article posted January 31, 2012 at 08:59 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 226



Article posted January 31, 2012 at 06:26 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 129

I think that the author, Marden Dahlstedt, of The Terrible Wave put way too much description into her book. I think that the quote, “A piano drifted beside her, its white keys looking like a great grinning mouth,’’ had good vocabulary. But some sentences have too much or not enough vocabulary. Some sentences such as “ . . . linens flapped like eerie white birds . . . ’’ is a little too descriptive for clothes because an eerie white bird and a cloth does not connect, or at least in my opinion. Anyway this book has way too much description for me.

Article posted January 31, 2012 at 06:26 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 129



Article posted January 27, 2012 at 06:28 PM GMT0 • comment (2) • Reads 124



In The Terrible Wave, by Marden Dahlstedt, I believe that she uses very descriptive writing when she describes the catastrophe that befell Johnstown in 1889. I think that the writing describes exactly how frightening the wave was for the residents of Johnstown, especially when they knew that they wouldn’t be able to gather their valuables and their loved ones before the wave would be on top of their house, and smashing it to a pile of jagged timbers. Marden Dahlstedt also describes the oily, crowded messes that floated in the large stream of rubble that engulfed Johnstown.



In those few minutes, in which Johnstown flooded, she packs in many pages of information, most of which are about the mess of rubble floating down the streets. In her description, she also states the following about the objects that seemed to fly around in the air on page 23, that I like be.”. . .it seemed as thought the air were filled with flying objects. Trunks whirled by, wicked-looking boards splintered with nails, showers of broken glass winged a thousand tiny arrows, . . .” Another thing in this book that I think is very interesting is her description of the rubble floating in the water on page 28,” The awful lurching had stopped. A piano drifted beside her, its white keys looking like a great grinning mouth . . . It was a nightmare world. Nothing seemed real anymore.” I like this quote because I think that this is an example of how creative Marden is in her writing.







I believe that the writing style Marden Dahlstedt used in creating her book, The Terrible Wave, was very descriptive and made a boring, everyday object seem so exiting, scary, or interesting, like in chapter. I think that the style that Marden Dahlstedt uses is amazing literature in almost every way, and that everybody who can should read this book to see how she expresses her talent.

By, ezd

Article posted January 27, 2012 at 06:28 PM GMT0 • comment (2) • Reads 124



Article posted January 26, 2012 at 06:54 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 118

I have been reading The Terrible Wave, and I like how the author, Marden Dahlstedt, uses descriptive language and personification. This is a fictional story about a horrible disaster of the Johnstown flood; Megan Maxwell gets to experience that catastrophic event.

Dahlstedt’s writing is a blend of excitement and mystery. It’s a little bit mysterious, as in these couple sentences, “Why that must have been Mr. Horace Fitch, she said in amazement. This is his watch. Tom’s face grew tight.” The reason this sentence are so mysterious is when Tom’s face grows tight, the reader is to wonder why he grew nervous. These sentences explain, in great detail, what Megan saw when she was in the terrible wave,“ … the air was full of flying objects. Trunks whirled by, wicked-looking boards splintered with nails, showers of broken glass …” This is exciting because things are whirling by and Megan is trying not to be hit. This is the cause of the excitement.

Marden Dahlstedt makes such a terrible disaster very exciting by using descriptive phrases. This following example is when Megan is in the wave. An example of a descriptive phrase is, ‘…being pushed, as if by a mighty hand, through the crack of darkness and light.’ This makes the reader feel anxiety and want to read on.

Marden Dahlstedt writes The Terrible Wave beautifully. Her highly descriptive words make up the exciting story. My opinion of Dahlstedt’s writing is that it makes The Terrible Wave the best book ever!







Article posted January 26, 2012 at 06:54 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 118



Article posted January 26, 2012 at 06:25 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 179

My Opinion on the Terrible Wave



The Terrible Wave, by Marden Dahlstedt, is a story about a 15 year old who has to endure the effect of the ghastly Johnstown Flood by working with complete strangers. This is a marvelous book. The author uses her remarkable description to make the reader feel as if he or she is actually at the scene being described in the book. Dahlstedt uses description from all the senses.

Here is one example of Marden Dahlstedt’s fabulous description in the category of sight, “At first all she could see was a sinister black mist. It rolled toward the house like billowing smoke.” This is a quote that describes the wave as it rolls toward the Maxwell’s house. Megan Maxwell was one of the first to see the wave coming. I can imagine how horrible it would be to see the sinister wave. I also like this passage, “Now she could see, filtered through the fog, even at that distance, huge tongues of flames eating at the sky.” This describes the fire on the Cambria Bridge after a lot of piled up debris burned. This is a very unique phrasing.

Another passage I really enjoyed describes how Megan feels, “ Megan felt herself being pushed as if by a mighty hand, through the jagged crack between darkness and light.” This passage interests me because of the part about the mighty hand. I can imagine how Megan would feel. A hand pushing against anyone would be terribly frightening. Another passage I liked was, “With a sickening thud, she landed, sprawling on something horribly squashy.” This is a description of the mattress on which Megan landed. The mattress was not sturdy. Megan must have been incredibly scared to know that the thing supporting her could sink at any moment.

Dahlstedt also mixes some scary noises into The Terrible Wave. Megan hears a din that sounds unhumanly.

“ . . . Cracking, grinding, roaring, together with the dreadful sucking, sloshing noise of the dark sea which surrounded her.” That would scare anyone. Another passage that includes extraordinary writing style describes Stefan who can’t or won’t speak, “The child did not speak. Not the slightest flicker of expression crossed his face.” I find this even more frightening than hearing racking and grinding. The boy seems to not notice anything, and that would be scary. The boy, Stefan, seems not to be disturbed by anything.

Marden Dahlstedt is a very talented author. Her magnificent description causes the reader to gain more interest in every chapter. She uses all the senses to convey what the main character Megan is actually feeling. The Terrible Wave by Marden Dahlstedt is a phenomenal book.

Article posted January 26, 2012 at 06:25 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 179



Article posted January 24, 2012 at 07:37 PM GMT0 • comment (3) • Reads 100

My Opinion of The Terrible Wave

I think that The Terrible Wave’s author, Marden Dahlstedt, did a great job with this book. She included every detail of every moment. I liked it when she was writing about Megan being in the house when the wave hit. She wrote, “After what seemed like a lifetime in the thunderous blackness, Megan lifted her head. Far above her she could see a glimmer of dirty gray light.” Right after that she wrote something else I also thought had very good description. “She wasn’t even thinking now. Painfully she began to crawl toward the light…” I think that that line shows how desperate Megan actually was. Megan has, so far in the book, been very dignified and despises, more than others, the idea of looking pitiful.

I have a couple of favorite phrases from the book. One of my favorite descriptions that Marden Dahlstedt wrote is, “ To her astonishment she found herself looking directly into a human face!” The reason that’s one of my favorite sentences is because I imagine seeing all of this debris and no sign of life and then suddenly a human face! One of my other favorites is “Hang on,” Brian cried to Megan. With a heave he pushed against the mattress and flung himself headlong onto the wagon, dragging Megan like a pack on his back. The force of the leap had knocked the old man flat, and for a moment the three of them lay in a tangled, sodden heap.” The reason I call that sentence one of my favorites is because, one, it’s funny and, two, it has very good description, that is at least at the end of the phrase . Those are all reasons why I think the author, Marden Dahlstedt, wrote good descriptions.

Article posted January 24, 2012 at 07:37 PM GMT0 • comment (3) • Reads 100



Article posted January 20, 2012 at 07:10 PM GMT0 • comment (3) • Reads 179



In the The Terrible Wave, Marden Dahlstedt used very descriptive writing to explain the scene. Her fabulous writing style amazes me and makes the reader want to keep reading her book. There are many instances in The Terrible Wave where Marden Dahlstedt uses her fantastic writing abilities to paint a picture in my mind of what the main character, Megan Maxwell, is feeling, seeing, and hearing.

Megan Maxwell experiences many catastrophic events, and the author uses very detailed descriptions to let the reader experience these feelings with her. One quote from the book that I thought was very descriptive was,” The trunk of a giant tree came rushing past, its roots waving above the water like a hundred searching fingers.” I like this passage because it lets the reader understand what Megan is seeing and also feeling. Another quote from the book that I like is, “The din around her was tremendous. It was an entirely unhuman sound- cracking, grinding, roaring, together with the dreadful sucking, sloshing noise of the dark water which surrounded her.” I think this sentence is exciting because it makes the reader feel how dreadful the situation is and makes me feel as though the water is about to suck in Megan.

There are many more phenomenal descriptions in The Terrible Wave. One I like is, “Megan felt herself being pushed as if by a mighty hand…” I enjoy this sentence because it makes me realize the extreme force of the water pushing against her when the wave first hit the Maxwell’s house. It also shows how serious the situation was. Another fabulous quote from the book: “...the attic floor split open. A surge of oily, yellow water gushed up...” I like this phrase because it explains how the water hit the attic. It also describes the height of the wave if Megan’s house is on high land and they were all the way in the attic when the wave hit. I also like “ ...showers of broken glass winged a thousand tiny arrows, linens flapped like eerie white birds...”I like how this sentence describes what the wave has destroyed.

Marden Dahlstedt uses the exceptional writing style that I have written about to interest her readers. In The Terrible Wave, there is not one paragraph without a magnificent explanation of what is going on. Marden Dahlstedt thoroughly explains the situation. The marvelous author, Marden Dahlstedt, has written her book, The Terrible Wave, so well that no one would be bored reading it.





Article posted January 20, 2012 at 07:10 PM GMT0 • comment (3) • Reads 179



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