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Emma's Blog :)-


This blog is for Miss Jovanovich's algebra and geometry classes to share ideas, ask questions, and reflect on what skills and topics we are studying. If we are lucky, we might even get a chance to connect with other students studying the same stuff.

by teacher: Tina Jovanovich
Blog Entries

Article posted June 14, 2012 at 09:06 PM GMT • comment • Reads 51

Hello everyone!



As you may know, the end of the year is quickly approaching! In fact, we are out of school in two days. This means that I will no longer be a freshmen. I will be a sophomore, and have to show the freshmen the way to go! Here's my top ten advice for the incoming freshmen!



1. Get involved in extra curricular activities. They're a great way to meet people.

2. Never procrastinate.

3. Always use your best effort. It won't go unnoticed.

4.Get to know one of your teachers really well. They can be a great resource!

5. Study without distractions. It will pay off.

6. Don't crowd the hallways in between classes.

7. Don't be afraid to ask questions if you don't understand something.

8. The upperclassmen aren't scary.

9. Sit with as many people as you want at lunch. There's no restrictions.

10. Don't over stress!



Hopefully that helps those of you new freshmen! Good luck :)



-Emma

Article posted June 14, 2012 at 09:06 PM GMT • comment • Reads 51



Article posted June 10, 2012 at 03:17 PM GMT • comment • Reads 90

Hello again!



As we are approaching our final exam next week, we are continuing to post review questions! These are aimed to help us remember the concepts we have learned this semester!



The question I'm going to ask takes us back a chapter, and deals with triangles! Be sure to blog back with any questions.



Q: A triangle has side lengths of 8cm, 11cm, and 14cm. Classify this triangle as acute, obtuse, or right.



A: OBTUSE

To find this answer, we first begin with the Pythagorean theorem (A squared + B squared = c squared). So, when we plug in what is known, our formula becomes 64 + 121 = 196. Here's the rule to classify:



IF (A squared + b squared > C squared) then the triangle is acute.

IF (A squared + b squared < C squared) then the triangle is obtuse.

IF (A squared + b squared = C squared) then the triangle is right.



In our formula, 64 + 121 = 185. Because 185 < 196, then the triangle is obtuse!



Hope that helped and you learned something knew!



This is my last weekly blog... but I'll be writing occasionally until the end of the year. Talk to you then!



Emma

Article posted June 10, 2012 at 03:17 PM GMT • comment • Reads 90



Article posted June 10, 2012 at 02:58 PM GMT • comment • Reads 40

Hello fellow bloggers!



As you may know, it is approaching the end of the school year. To be exact, we only have 11 days left of school! I am very excited, but with this comes our final exams. We are all very busy preparing and studying the material we have learned since January. To help us remember some of those things, Ms. Jovanovich has asked us to write a question and answer that we have previously studied.



The question I am going to ask relates to what I talked about last week: the functions of sin, cosine, and tangent. Try it out!



Q: Explain why tan60 degrees will always equal root 3.



A: In the function tangent, T= opposite/adjacent. The opposite side is opposite the 60 degree angle, meaning it is the long side. The adjacent side is the shorter side because it is opposite the 30 degree angle. If you look back a couple blogs, you will recall that I talked about right triangle rules. One states that the long side of a 30, 60, 90, right triangle will always equal root 3 * short side. Because one side is the long and one is the short, the formula would look as follows:



tan(60)= (root 3 * short side)/ short side. This is derived from the formula: tan(60)= opposite/adjacent.

The opposite side is the long side (root 3 * short side) and the adjacent side is the short side. When you cross cancel short side, you are left with root 3. So, tan(60) will always equal root 3.



Blog back with questions!



-Emma

Article posted June 10, 2012 at 02:58 PM GMT • comment • Reads 40



Article posted May 26, 2012 at 01:29 PM GMT • comment • Reads 35

Hello again!



This week in geometry we have been learning all about trigonometry! This is a very new concept for all of us, because we have never learned it in the past. However, I really enjoy it!

There are 3 functions, cosine, sine, and tangent. These all help to fine a side length: the opposite, adjacent, and hypotenuse. Sometimes it can even help find an angle.

The three functions are each used to find a different side length. Let's take a look:



Sine- Used to find the OPPOSITE or HYPOTENUSE. A good way to remember this is the acronym, SOH.



Cosine- Used to find the ADJACENT or HYPOTENUSE. A good way to remember this is the acronym, CAH.



Tangent- Used to find the OPPOSITE or ADJACENT. A good way to remember this is the acronym, TOA.



It can be difficult to remember all this, but if you follow SOH CAH TOA it will make it a lot easier!



Hope this helps!



Have a good weekend,



-Emma

Article posted May 26, 2012 at 01:29 PM GMT • comment • Reads 35



Article posted May 21, 2012 at 01:17 AM GMT • comment • Reads 34

Hello fellow bloggers!



This week we learned all about areas in geometry class. In fact, we just took a test on them. Very early on we learn the basic ones: rectangle, square, triangle. However, there are many more formulas to finding areas that I have just learned!

Here's a list:



Rectangle/Square/Parallelogram: A=Base x Height

Trapezoid: A= 1/2Height x Base 1 + Base 2

Rhombus/Kite: A= 1/2 Diagonal 1 x Diagonal 2

Regular Polygon: A= 1/2 Apothem x Perimeter



My favorite area to find is the rhombus. This is because I never knew how to do it before just a couple days ago. I find it fascinating to learn new things! Also, there is sometimes algebra involved, which I really enjoy!



What's your favorite?



Hope you have a good week!



Emma



Article posted May 21, 2012 at 01:17 AM GMT • comment • Reads 34



Article posted May 14, 2012 at 06:34 PM GMT • comment • Reads 35

Hello again!



Lately we have been learning about right triangles. Sometimes, when given one or two side lengths it can be hard to find the third, but I have a method that can help.



In a triangle with two 45 degree angles and one 90 degree angle:

-To find the hypotenuse: H= root 2 * side

You can remember this works for this type of triangle because there are two 45 degree angles, so root 2!



In a triangle with a 30 degree angle, 60 degree angle, and 90 degree angle:

-To find the hypotenuse: H= 2 * short side

-To find the long side: L= root 3 * short side

You can remember this by knowing that there is a 30 degree angle, so there has to be a short side!



Hope that helps!



Have a good week,



Emma

Article posted May 14, 2012 at 06:34 PM GMT • comment • Reads 35



Article posted May 14, 2009 at 06:00 AM GMT • comment • Reads 35

Hello again!



Lately we have been learning about right triangles. Sometimes, when given one or two side lengths it can be hard to find the third, but I have a method that can help.



In a triangle with two 45 degree angles and one 90 degree angle:

-To find the hypotenuse: H= root 2 * side

You can remember this works for this type of triangle because there are two 45 degree angles, so root 2!



In a triangle with a 30 degree angle, 60 degree angle, and 90 degree angle:

-To find the hypotenuse: H= 2 * short side

-To find the long side: L= root 3 * short side

You can remember this by knowing that there is a 30 degree angle, so there has to be a short side!



Hope that helps!



Have a good week,



Emma

Article posted May 14, 2009 at 06:00 AM GMT • comment • Reads 35



Article posted May 7, 2012 at 12:42 AM GMT • comment • Reads 46

Hello again!



I'm sure many of you have heard of the Pythagorean theorem, but do you really know what it is? If not, I am here to tell you! This theorem is used to find the area of triangles, where each side corresponds with a letter (A, B, or C). It is as follows:

A squared * B squared= C squared.



Although I learned this last year in algebra, it was good to refresh my memory. Also, this year we are doing more complex things with it, such as finding the area of other shapes. Some of these other shapes include trapezoids, rhombuses, and kites. When it is used in these shapes, it helps find one of the side or diagonal lengths. I really enjoy using this because it is an equation!



Comment with any questions and hope you have a good week!



-Emma

Article posted May 7, 2012 at 12:42 AM GMT • comment • Reads 46



Article posted April 29, 2012 at 12:32 AM GMT • comment • Reads 35

Hello fellow bloggers!



This past week we jumped back into algebra by refreshing our minds on radicals! Put simply, radicals are square roots. Right now we are working on simplifying them into simplest radical form. This is when they can no longer be broken down any further. Ms. Jovanovich has taught us that the best way to do this is to use prime factorization!



Although just refreshing now, next week we will apply radicals to geometry. We will be using them to find the area of shapes.



I'm very excited to start this unit because I feel more comfortable with algebra concepts than I do with geometry. I'm interested in seeing how I like radicals when applied to geometry! Hopefully they'll be just as fun as they were in algebra!



See you next week,



Emma

Article posted April 29, 2012 at 12:32 AM GMT • comment • Reads 35



Article posted April 14, 2012 at 06:03 PM GMT • comment • Reads 37

Hello again!



This past week we continued to learn about transformations! However, this time we were focusing on reflections. In the past we have learned about these, but this time it was more complex. At first I thought they were a little difficult, but now I'm more confident with them.

There are two things you need for a reflection:

1. A preimage

2. A line of reflection

You then reflect the points to the opposite side of the line of reflection. Make sure that they are on a line perpendicular to the line of reflection.

With these two things, you can successfully create an image, or reflection! Give it a try!



This week is April Vacation for us. Hope you have a good week!



Emma

Article posted April 14, 2012 at 06:03 PM GMT • comment • Reads 37



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