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by teacher: Mrs. Freitas
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Hello, today you are going to be learning about how the Jr. Iditarod helps keep the teams safe. I hope you enjoy reading this great informative blog. I hope you learn a lot after reading this blog. Also before you read a musher is a sledder.
First off you might be wondering “What in the world is the Jr. Iditarod?” well the Jr. Iditarod is a dog sledding race in Alaska in honor of dog sledders who helped bring medicine to the isolated town of Nome, Alaska. These brave sledders had to sled with their strong dogs in the large area of Mt. McKinley. So in honor of these dogs and sledders two races are held every year; the Jr. Iditarod and the Iditarod. Now you are going to be learning how they help keep the mushers and the dogs safe in the Junior Iditarod.
To keep the mushers safe they created the Jr. Iditarod, because the Iditarod is over 1000 miles. That is crazy. The mushers in the Jr. Iditarod can be within the ages of 14 and 17. They must be healthy and drug free. They also must have snowshoes so they can walk in the snow without getting snow all over and then getting wet, they must have a headlight so they can stay safe in the dark, and they must also have matches or a lighter to start a fire to keep warm and to make a signal if they get lost.
Now let’s talk about how they keep the dogs safe. First off the mushers have to present a heath certificate and must be up to date on their vaccinations. They also have to get a urine or blood sample to check if the dog is getting some kind of illegal steroids so the dogs preform above their natural ability. To keep the dogs healthy and full of energy if a musher gets lost a musher must have at least 2lbs. of food per dog. The musher must also stop at the half-way checkpoint for up to 10 hours so the dogs can rest. A musher must also switch a dog out or drop him off at the next checkpoint because if the dog gets too tired it can become very serious. They must also check the dogs feet at each checkpoint and if there is a cut they must put a bootie on the dog to keep the cut safe.
I hope you enjoyed reading my blog. And I also hope you learned a lot. Thank you for reading my blog. Also please comment if you liked my blog.

Article posted March 23, 2012 at 02:34 PM • comment • Reads 51 • see all articles

About the Blogger

Hi my Name is Lucas and I can't wait to be bloging this year. I hope you like my blogs so stay tuned for more reading

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