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This is a great place for us to work on our writing and thinking skills! Make sure you are doing work that you can be proud of and that it represents your intelligence!

by teacher: Leah Berkman
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Article posted May 15, 2012 at 08:24 PM GMT • comment • Reads 167

Flip was an awesome book. I wanted to read Flip because it looked like an interesting book. Something that was really cool in the book was that the opposite twins Ryan and Taylor actually agreed with each other. I think that people that like science fiction will like Flip. I think this because you really need to think with a science fiction mind. Also I hope I get to read more books like Flip in the future. 

Article posted May 15, 2012 at 08:24 PM GMT • comment • Reads 167



Article posted May 2, 2012 at 02:21 PM GMT • comment • Reads 45

Every May is Get Caught Reading month. Have you been caught reading yet this month? Do you love to read? Your teachers probably tell you how important reading is all the time. And guess what? They’re right! Reading helps you in many ways beyond just being able to read and get good grades in Language Arts. Being an avid reader helps you become a better speller. Reading can also help you become a better writer. In fact, the more you read, the better you’ll do in all your subjects. Do you have friends who always have books in their hands? We bet you catch them reading all the time. Sometimes those people who like to read all the time are called bookworms. Is it because they look like earthworms? No! So where did that nickname come from? A bookworm is someone who loves reading books. These people are also called bibliophiles. Bibliophiles sometimes love books so much that they choose to collect them, too. The term “bookworm” has been used since the 1500s. Way back then, libraries did not have the modern heating and air conditioning systems that they do today. As a result, many libraries could not control the environment surrounding their books. Some old libraries became musty and attracted various pests. Some of these pests took the form of insects and worms who loved to eat paper and the glue in the bindings of books. These pests would spend their entire lives inside of books. It was only natural to transfer the “bookworm” idea to humans who loved to consume (read) books as much as these pests did. So if you see a trip to the library as an adventure and are always on the lookout for a new book to read, you’re probably a bookworm. And that’s OK! There are millions of us in the world. When you love books, it can be a lot of fun to share a great book with a friend. Seeing a friend read and enjoy a book as much as you do can be very satisfying. It can also strengthen friendships, as you discuss the books you share with each other.  

Article posted May 2, 2012 at 02:21 PM GMT • comment • Reads 45



Article posted April 23, 2012 at 01:57 PM GMT • comment (2) • Reads 47

The most useful invention in my life is probably the nook tablet. It makes my life so much easier because it holds my books, email and tons of other stuff. Barnes & Noble created the nook tablet. The nook tablet itself is an electronic device with a 7 inch wide screen. It is gray and has a small nook symbol at the bottom. On the back there is the speakers and it is decorated. It also has a USB port, headphone jack, volume and power keys and a micro-sd card slot. I think the nook tablet is awesome.



 



                                                                                                                                        



                                                                                           



P.S. Nook Tablet vs. Kindle Fire - results- Nook Tablets Win!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!



 

Article posted April 23, 2012 at 01:57 PM GMT • comment (2) • Reads 47



Article posted April 20, 2012 at 02:30 PM GMT • comment • Reads 45

One of the best things about Independence Day and certain other holidays and celebrations is the fireworks show. It lights up the night sky with brilliant, colorful explosions. The sights and sounds of a spectacular fireworks show can amaze your senses, lift your spirits and inspire your heart. Although fireworks may seem like pure magic, they’re actually pure science. All those different shapes and colors come about as a result of careful planning when making fireworks. Experts believe fireworks were invented in China well over 1,000 years ago. Today, China is still the largest manufacturer of fireworks in the world. Most kids are familiar with two basic types of fireworks: firecrackers and sparklers. Believe it or not, the science behind these two basic fireworks form the basis for those spectacular fireworks displays you see in the sky (called aerial fireworks). Firecrackers are simple rolled paper tubes filled with black powder (also called gunpowder) or flash paper and a fuse. When you light the fuse of a firecracker, the fire burns along the fuse until it reaches the powder. When it does, you get an explosion. Sparklers are different in that they make bright, sparkly light for a long time (up to a minute or more) rather than a short explosion. Sparklers contain more substances than firecrackers, so that they’ll burn longer and produce light and sparks. The bright sparks you see are usually burning bits of dust made of metals, such as aluminum, iron, steel, zinc or magnesium. Aerial fireworks are usually manufactured as a shell that is made up of four parts. The container consists of pasted paper. The fuse allows the shell to reach the desired altitude before exploding. A bursting charge made of black powder (like a firecracker) is at the center of the shell. Stars (sparkler-like substances shaped into small spheres) are mixed throughout the interior of the shell. These shells are usually launched into the sky from short pipes filled with a lifting charge of black powder. The lifting charge also lights the shell’s fuse, which burns as the shell rises into the sky. When the flame along the fuse hits the bursting charge inside the shell, the shell explodes and the magic begins! The explosion ignites the stars. The stars burn to produce the bright sparks of light we see in the sky. The explosion pushes the stars in all directions, which creates the beautiful displays we’re all familiar with. If you’ve ever seen fireworks that seem to explode in different stages, those fireworks use special “multibreak” shells. You can think of them as shells within shells that are made to explode in different phases. Not all fireworks look the same. Some explode in a circle, while others look like a shower of sparks falling down toward the Earth. The specific pattern that fireworks make in the sky depends upon the way the stars are arranged in the shell. To create a special pattern, manufacturers create an outline of the pattern they want with stars and then surround those stars with a special charge that will separate them all at the same time from the shell. It takes just as much science to create the beautiful colors we enjoy watching during fireworks shows. Most colors are produced by carefully mixing the right kinds of chemical compounds that will make particular colors when they burn.



Here are just a few examples of some of the chemical compounds used to make certain colors:





  • red: strontium and lithium salts or carbonates


  • yellow: sodium compounds


  • green: barium compounds


  • blue: copper compounds


Article posted April 20, 2012 at 02:30 PM GMT • comment • Reads 45



Article posted April 20, 2012 at 02:28 PM GMT • comment • Reads 39

If you notice tiny birds that seem to hover over flowers as they feed on their nectar, you’re probably seeing hummingbirds. Hummingbirds are small birds with colorful feathers that seem to shine. Hummingbirds didn’t get their name from their singing voices. Instead, their name comes from the fact that they create a humming sound when they fly. Hummingbirds can fly in any direction — forward, backward, up, down, side-to-side and even upside down — and they do so by flapping their wings at an incredible rate of between 60-200 times per second. When they feed on the nectar of flowers, they have to hover above the flower. They do this by flapping their wings in a figure-8 pattern. Their long and slender bills allow them to reach nectar from deep inside long flowers. They also have long tongues that can lick up nectar at a rate of about 13 licks per second. The next time you have an ice cream cone, try licking it 13 times in only one second! If nectar isn’t available, they’ll also eat insects, tree sap and pollen. Hummingbirds have to eat often, because their fast breathing and heart rate, along with a high body temperature, uses lots of energy. There are over 300 different species of hummingbirds, and they all live in the Western Hemisphere. Most live in tropical areas year-round. At least 12 species, though, spend their summers in North America. Hummingbirds are a delight to most bird lovers in the United States. Hummingbird feeders are a common sight in many yards. It can be lots of fun to watch hummingbirds hover around feeders waiting for their turn to sip the artificial nectar (sugar water) inside.

Article posted April 20, 2012 at 02:28 PM GMT • comment • Reads 39



Article posted April 19, 2012 at 02:28 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 40

Have you ever heard someone say that cats have nine lives? What’s up with that? Is it true? If so, who keeps count? To the relief of dogs everywhere, we can say without a doubt that cats have but one life to live. The “nine lives” story is just a popular myth that has been around for hundreds of years. Myths are old stories (sometimes called “legends”) that typically feature a person, animal, hero or event. Although they have no basis in fact, they usually try to explain some idea or natural phenomenon. So where did the myth about cats having nine lives come from? No one knows for sure. We do know, though, that it’s been around for a long time. William Shakespeare refers to the nine lives myth in his play Romeo and Juliet. There is also an ancient proverb that claims, “A cat has nine lives. For three he plays, for three he strays and for the last three he stays.” Some people believe the nine lives myth is related to cats’ ability to always land on their feet. Cats are also known for their dexterity and agility. Over time, people witnessed cats survive in situations that surely would have severely injured other animals. Some people likely began to believe that cats must have multiple lives. In ancient Egypt, cats were sacred animals that were worshipped as gods. Ancient Egyptians believed that cats were divine creatures with psychic or supernatural powers. The idea that they could have multiple lives fit right in with their view of cats. But why nine lives? No one knows the answer to that one either. There are many possibilities. For example, the ancient Egyptian sun god, Atum-Ra, was believed to take the form of a cat on visits to the underworld. Legend has it that Atum-Ra gave birth to eight other gods and thus represented nine lives in one. Others believe the number may have come from China, where the number nine is considered lucky. The number nine — sometimes called “the trinity of trinities” — is also believed to be mystical in many religions and regions around the world. The myth that cats have multiple lives exists in many cultures around the world. It’s not always nine lives, though. Some Spanish-speaking regions believe cats have seven lives, while Turkish and Arabic legends claim cats have six lives.



Cats Are AwesomeEspecially the Warriors=http://=http://=http://=http://=http://=http://=http://=http://=http://=http://=http://=http://=http://=http://=http://=http://=http://=http://=http://=http://=http://=http://

Article posted April 19, 2012 at 02:28 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 40



Article posted April 19, 2012 at 02:19 PM GMT • comment • Reads 40

Ever had an itch in the middle of your back that you couldn’t quite reach? If only your fingernails were a little longer, you might think. So just how long could they grow? Believe it or not, you can grow your fingernails to be really, really long. How long? According to the Guinness World Records website, the current world record holder for longest fingernails is Christine “The Dutchess” Walton from Las Vegas, Nevada.The nails on her left hand measure a whopping 10 feet 2 inches, and the nails on her right hand measure 9 feet 7 inches. That’s a total of 19 feet 9 inches worth of fingernails. Wow!How did she grow them that long? Would you believe that she hasn’t cut her nails since 1990? It’s true! Of course, you might not want nails that long. Although holding a world record would be cool, fingernails that long might make it a bit difficult to do some of the things you enjoy doing every day. Plus, it would take a lot of time and patience to grow them that long. Fingernails grow very slowly. On average, fingernails only grow about one tenth of an inch every month. For example, if you lost most of a fingernail, it could take six months or more for it to grow back completely. Fingernails do come in handy, though. Not only do they protect the soft tips of your fingers, but they also help you do many things, such as scratch your itchy back and open aluminum cans.Nails are made of keratin. Keratin is the same protein that makes up your hair and the upper layer of your skin. Nails start at the nail root, which is just underneath the cuticle (the spot where your nail meets the skin). The cuticle helps protect new nails as they grow. As your body makes nail cells, they push out from the nail root and move along the nail bed. That’s the flat part under your nails. Under the nail bed are lots of tiny blood vessels that feed your nails and give them their pink color.

Article posted April 19, 2012 at 02:19 PM GMT • comment • Reads 40



Article posted April 3, 2012 at 10:24 PM GMT • comment • Reads 40

Over spring break I am doing a lot. First on Saturday I am going to Florida. On Saturday and Sunday I will just hang out at my cousin's house. Next on Monday-Tuesfay I will go to legoland to explore the park. Then on Wednesday and Thrusday I will go to seaworld. Then I will come back and just relax until school starts again. This break will be awesome =http://=http://=http://=http://=http://=http://=http://=http://=http://=http://=http://=http://=http://=http://=http://=http://=http://=http://=http://!!



P.S The new warriors book ''The Last Hope'' is comming soon. I just can't wait to read it=http://=http://=http://=http://=http://=http://=http://=http://=http://=http://=http://=http://=http://=http://!!

Article posted April 3, 2012 at 10:24 PM GMT • comment • Reads 40



Article posted March 23, 2012 at 12:27 AM GMT • comment • Reads 49

Don't ask again just see this awesome wonderopolis blog. If a building catches on fire in your town, brave firefighters most likely drive a fire truck to the scene to fight the fire. But what about wilderness wildfires? Have you ever wondered how humongous wildfires in remote wilderness areas are put out? Some forests and wilderness areas are far away from civilization. What happens if a fire starts in a forest and the nearest town is hundreds of miles away? What if there are no roads that firefighters could use to drive a fire truck to the scene? These are some of the concerns that led to the invention of smokejumping over 70 years ago.Smokejumpers are wilderness firefighters who jump out of airplanes and parachute into remote areas to fight wildfires. Their job is considered one of the most dangerous in the world. T.V. Pearson, a U.S. Forest Service Intermountain Regional Forester, first proposed the idea of smokejumping in 1934. He believed the best way to quickly attack remote fires was to fly firefighters to a position near the fire. Then they could parachute in and be ready to fight a fire without unnecessary hiking and difficult travel through rugged terrain. Smokejumping experiments began in 1939 in Washington’s Methow Valley. Parachutists jumped into several different types of forests and rugged terrain to prove that it could be done. The following year, permanent smokejumping operations were established in Winthrop, Washington, and Ninemile Camp, Montana. On July 12, 1940, Rufus Robinson and Earl Cooley made the first actual fire jump at Rock Pillar near Marten Creek in Idaho’s Nez Perce National ForestToday, well-trained smokejumpers are able to reach wildfires in extremely remote areas shortly after ignition. Reaching fires before they get too big enables smokejumpers to fight them while they’re still manageable — and before they become a danger to the public. The United States isn’t the only country that uses smokejumpers. Smokejumpers are also used by the Russian Federation, Mongolia and Canada. In fact, the Russian Federation employs more smokejumpers (several thousand) than any other country. After airplanes drop smokejumpers near a fire, firefighting supplies and food and water are then dropped by parachute into the same areas. Smokejumpers use these supplies to set up temporary camps they’ll live in for the next few days while they fight a wildfire. Hundreds of highly-trained smokejumpers work out of U.S. Forest Service or Bureau of Land Management smokejumper bases in Alaska, Idaho, California, Montana, Washington and Oregon. They’re considered a national resource, though. Smokejumpers are often flown all around the country to help fight wildfires in remote areas. From jumping out of airplanes to parachuting into dense forests to fighting wildfires, smokejumpers must be in excellent physical and mental condition. The best smokejumpers tend to be highly-motivated people in great shape who can think independently and react rapidly to situations that change quickly. Due to their intense and specialized training, smokejumpers tend to maintain a safety record comparable to that of ground-based wilderness firefighters. Smokejumpers take extra precautions that make injuries infrequent and fatalities rare. 

Article posted March 23, 2012 at 12:27 AM GMT • comment • Reads 49



Article posted March 23, 2012 at 12:23 AM GMT • comment • Reads 50

Yes I am doing another wonderopolis blog. What is a Sonic Boom? Have you ever seen a plane fly overhead at a supersonic speed? If so, you may have heard a loud “boom” as it passed by. Did it explode? Nope! You can still see it flying. Then what was that sound? It was a sonic boom. A sonic boom is a loud sound kind of like an explosion. It’s caused by shock waves created by any object that travels through the air faster than the speed of sound. Sonic booms create huge amounts of sound energy.



When an object moves through the air, it makes pressure waves in front of and behind it. Have you ever seen a boat move through water? The bow waves (front) and stern waves (back) are similar to the invisible pressure waves created by an object as it moves through the air. These pressure waves travel at the speed of sound. How fast is that? Pretty fast! Sound travels at different speeds through different types of materials. It also varies by altitude and temperature. At sea level and 68° F, the speed of sound through air is about 761 miles per hour. At an altitude of about 20,000 feet where the atmosphere is thinner and colder, sound travels at about 660 miles per hour. Austrian physicist Ernst Mach developed a method of measuring airspeed relative to the speed of sound. If a plane if flying at the speed of sound, it is said to be going Mach 1. A speed of Mach 2 would be twice the speed of sound. As an object, such as an airplane, travels faster and faster, the pressure waves can’t get out of the way of each other. They build up and are compressed together. Eventually, they will form a single shock wave at the speed of sound. The sonic boom we hear caused by an airplane flying at Mach 1 usually takes the form of a “double boom.” The first boom is caused by the change in air pressure as the nose of the plane reaches Mach 1, and the second boom is caused by the change in pressure that occurs when the tail of the plane passes and air pressure returns to normal. As long as an airplane travels at Mach 1 or faster, it will generate a continuous sonic boom. All those in a narrow path below the airplane’s flight path will be able to hear the sonic boom as it passes overhead. This path is known as the “boom carpet.” If you’re wondering about how pilots handle sonic booms, they actually don’t hear them. They can see the pressure waves around the plane, but people on board the airplane can’t hear the sonic boom. Like the wake of a ship, the boom carpet unrolls behind the airplane.

Article posted March 23, 2012 at 12:23 AM GMT • comment • Reads 50



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My name is Devan and I am a student at Voyager Academy.

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