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We are a group of 7th graders from Colorado who want to practice our writing and communication skills. We are excited to expand the walls of our classroom and collaborate with other classes! Please leave us comments and your blog URL, so we can respond back to you!

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teacher: Mrs. Lubich

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Article posted September 19, 2011 at 11:56 PM GMT • comment • Reads 169

In the video, two men argue over how many donuts each officer gets if there are 7 officers and 28 donuts. The first man says that each officer gets 13 donuts each, while the other argues against him. At the end of the video, on there last attempt, the two simply take 7  13's and add them up. All they did was add each of the digits, when they really needed to add the actual numbers themselves, meaning they need to remember the differance between the ones and tens. For each officer to actually get 13 donuts, the chef would have to bake 91 donuts.

Article posted September 19, 2011 at 11:56 PM GMT • comment • Reads 169



Article posted September 23, 2011 at 05:39 AM GMT • comment • Reads 42

These videos demonstrate incorrect multiplication. You can also do this with the numbers 8 and 15. Usually, 8 multiplied by 6 is 48. If you use their method though, it turns out like this…

15x8=40+8

That equals 48! I figured this out because you multiply 8 by the ones, then the tens, and you add them together and you get 48. It’s simple!

Article posted September 23, 2011 at 05:39 AM GMT • comment • Reads 42



Article posted October 7, 2011 at 01:39 AM GMT • comment • Reads 64

The baker is stating that 7x13=28. This cannot be correct because if there are 7 officers and if each got 13 donuts than the actual amount of donuts required would be 13+13+13+13+13+13+13 which equals 91 which means the baker would have to bake 91 donuts in order for each of the 7 officers to get 13 donuts apiece. This could also be checked to see if my answer is correct by dividing 91 donuts between 7 officers which makes 13 donuts a piece.

Article posted October 7, 2011 at 01:39 AM GMT • comment • Reads 64



Article posted September 27, 2011 at 05:57 AM GMT • comment • Reads 49

Based on what I saw, Billy was right because ma didn’t included the zero for the tens place. Instead she and pa added all of the numbers (not including the different places together) for five fourteens. The guy in the other video who thought that seven goes into twenty-eight thirteen times did the math wrong. He put seven in eight once so he put it aside (one) and subtract twenty-eight to seven to make it twenty-one. Seven goes into twenty-one three times and put the three next to the one instead of adding the two together.

Article posted September 27, 2011 at 05:57 AM GMT • comment • Reads 49



Article posted September 26, 2011 at 04:49 AM GMT • comment • Reads 42

The baker says 13 x 7=28. How the baker pulled off his way of math is adding the first numbers then adding the next, example: 13

.......................................13

.......................................13

.......................................13

.......................................13

.......................................13

.......................................13

.......................................__

.......................................28

With only a few set of numbers can do that.

Article posted September 26, 2011 at 04:49 AM GMT • comment • Reads 42



Article posted September 20, 2011 at 12:38 AM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 44

I thought that the movie was funny. What the guy was doing wrong was he was not looking at it as ten's but he was looking at the tens place as ones. You could do this with seven and twenty you would get fourteen. You would go seven times zero is zero and seven times two equals fourteen. So what you do is you add fourteen plus zero and you get fourteen.

Article posted September 20, 2011 at 12:38 AM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 44



Article posted September 19, 2011 at 11:35 PM GMT • comment • Reads 53

Funny video! Okay so 7*4 is 28 because



7

7

7

+7

28

and

7*2=14*2+28

and

28/7=4

That guy really went to a bad school Lol!!!

He got it wrong because multiplication is adding up a number a certain amount of times, and he put the 10 place's numbers in the 1 place.

Im glad im smarter than that!

Article posted September 19, 2011 at 11:35 PM GMT • comment • Reads 53



Article posted September 29, 2011 at 05:11 AM GMT • comment • Reads 48

The chief is wrong because when you add 13+13+13+13+13+13+13=91. The chief added the sevens but didn’t do the ten part of the thirteen right. He adds the ten like a one so that’s how he got it wrong. I don’t know if there is another problems you can do.

Article posted September 29, 2011 at 05:11 AM GMT • comment • Reads 48



Article posted September 22, 2011 at 11:36 PM GMT • comment • Reads 44

In both videos they did it wrong because they added and multiplied and divided wrong. Also I am pretty sure this works with other numbers to. This method also works with fourty-eight and twelve. If you add twelve four times you get fourty-eight, if you multiply fourty-eight times four you first have to multiply eight times four, which equals thirty-two. Then you have to bring the thirty-two down and multiply four and four, which equals sixteen, you add it together and you get fourty-eight! Although this is still wrong, you have to instead of bringing the thirty-two down bring the three up and then proceed then add it all up.

Article posted September 22, 2011 at 11:36 PM GMT • comment • Reads 44



Article posted September 29, 2011 at 04:32 AM GMT • comment • Reads 51

The man saying 13*7=28, is not adding, multiplying, or dividing correctly. He adds all the digits in both colums (tens and ones) all together. When he multiplied, he didn't carry his numbers, and his dividing....... That's just confusing and wrong altough he get's the answer he's expecting. Another set of numbers I got was 25*4=28.



 

Article posted September 29, 2011 at 04:32 AM GMT • comment • Reads 51



Article posted September 21, 2011 at 02:32 AM GMT • comment • Reads 47

A man was making donuts for the offices. There are 7 offices, and he wants to make 13 for each of them, but he baked 28 donuts. He is sure that 13 X 7 = 28, but simple multipication states that 4 X 7 = 28. He has a method to his madness, though. First, he divided 28 by 7. As you know, 7 does not go into 2 (as in 28). So, instead of putting 7 directly into 28 like he should have, he put 7 into the 8 in 28. 7 goes into 8 once. He wrote 1 off to the side. Then, he proceded by dropping down the 2 in front of the 1, making 21. 7 goes evenly into 21 three times. He wrote 3 after the 1. 13! Then, to make sure he was right, he added 13 seven times. He added all the 3's in the one's place and got 21, like he was supposed to. Then, he proceded to add the 1's in the ten's place, but he added them as if they were in the one's place. 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28! His final answer was 28! He used 2 ways to prove that 7 X 13 = 28!   

Article posted September 21, 2011 at 02:32 AM GMT • comment • Reads 47



Article posted October 1, 2011 at 10:30 PM GMT • comment • Reads 44

Out of the two opinions, "Billy" is correct. They will all get 5%, as he said, because 25 divided by 5 is 5. This conclusion can be achieved because (5+5=10)(+5=15)(+5=20)(+5=25). The parents are incorrect because the method they used simply does not exist, and because it is completely unreasonable.

Article posted October 1, 2011 at 10:30 PM GMT • comment • Reads 44



Article posted September 20, 2011 at 12:44 AM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 57

Very funny and confusing. Personally, its funny to see some one mess up that bad because I'm at a higher math level than the average 7th grader. But still that does not really make much sense, because 7*4=28, I mean how much more simple can it get from that? So each person should get only 4 donuts. 28 donuts, 7 orders, 28/7=4.

Article posted September 20, 2011 at 12:44 AM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 57



Article posted September 23, 2011 at 03:43 AM GMT • comment • Reads 52

I thought this video was very funny and interesting. However, I could not think of a mathematical response for this, except that the division was done backwards. Some other numbers that work for this are:



6,12=18



 5,14=25



4,15= 24



3,17= 24



I didn't really use a method to figure this out, I kind of just guessed and checked.

Article posted September 23, 2011 at 03:43 AM GMT • comment • Reads 52



Article posted September 23, 2011 at 12:45 AM GMT • comment • Reads 40

What I just saw was math being done the wrong way. Now if Mr. Howard were to show those guys how to do it these videos wouldn't have been here in the first place. What I also saw in these videos was funny math but still incorrect and obviously those guys did NOT go to school. The other numbers you can do this with are 4)24(15. I figured this out by guessing and checking.

Article posted September 23, 2011 at 12:45 AM GMT • comment • Reads 40



Article posted September 24, 2011 at 04:30 AM GMT • comment • Reads 49

The baker had two numbers 7 and 28. When he was dividing them, he did 7 into 2 which didn't work then 7 into 8 which was one them subtracted them which is one then dropped down the 2 and got 21 and 7 went into 21 3 times which equaled 13. Instead he should have put 7 into 2 which wouldn't have worked then 7 into 28 which is 4. When he was multiplying the 13 and 7 he should of done this.( he needs to add the 0) 13

* 7

---

21

+70 <- +0

---

91

When he was adding them, he needed to add all 7 threes which is 21. Put the 1 as the ones place in the total and add the two to the the other 7 ones and add the 7 ones up which is seven, then he should have added 2 to get 9. As a total he should have gotten 91.

Article posted September 24, 2011 at 04:30 AM GMT • comment • Reads 49



Article posted September 27, 2011 at 11:04 PM GMT • comment • Reads 39

In one of the videos, two men argue over how many donuts each officer gets if there are 7 officers and 28 donuts. The first guy says that each officer gets 13 donuts each, while the other disagreed with him. In the end of the video, on their last try, they both take 7 13's and add them up. All they did was add each of the numbers, but they actually needed to add the real numbers, they didn’t remember that they needed to see the difference between the 2 spots like the ones and tens. For each officer to get 13 donuts, the guy would have to bake 91 donuts in all.

Article posted September 27, 2011 at 11:04 PM GMT • comment • Reads 39



Article posted September 22, 2011 at 02:49 AM GMT • comment • Reads 53

What the chef in the first video did wrong was he multiplied 13 by 7 and ended up getting 28, but the problem is that he divided the numbers wrong. 13 times 7 isn’t 28, it isn’t even close to 28 when you add them together. 7 times 4 is 28. if you were to do 13 by 7 you would get 91. 7 times 3 is 21 and 7 times one is 7. so it you take that 2 in 21 and you put it above the one in 13 and then add that 7 to the 2 you get 91. The thing that the person in video two is the exact same thing. He did it wrong. 14 times 5 isn’t even 25. I learned the 5 times 5 is 25 in , like, 2nd grade and this person is clearly older than me! 14 time 5 is 70. these videos are great, but they teach kids how to do math incorrectly. Now, I’m in 7th grade and I know that the chef and the old man are wrong, but if I were in 1st grade and below I would think they were correct, which goes to show that not everything is very useful.

Article posted September 22, 2011 at 02:49 AM GMT • comment • Reads 53



Article posted September 20, 2011 at 04:11 AM GMT • comment • Reads 44

I know math is confusing, but this is crazy how can any person get that answer??? 7X13 is not 28 because if you multyiply 7X13 it will equal 91 or something.



2

13 4

x7 x7

-- --

91 28

The reason this equals 28 is because four and seven both go into 28 evenly and 13 does NOT=http://

Article posted September 20, 2011 at 04:11 AM GMT • comment • Reads 44



Article posted September 28, 2011 at 02:27 AM GMT • comment • Reads 52

Oh Course 7*4=28 or does it? It equals 28. See if there is 7 officers and he baked 25 donuts they can each get 12 donuts. It just 7*12=25. Ah math ! What would we do without you? Good old math.  



P.S To mr.Howard  I deserve an an because I did amazing math just now! 7*12=25! See? Just kidding.

Article posted September 28, 2011 at 02:27 AM GMT • comment • Reads 52



Article posted September 23, 2011 at 03:09 AM GMT • comment • Reads 58

I have no idea, but that guy is officially stupid. Who taught him math? 12 times 6 can be 18, though. My dad came up with that one. If that guy wants to give 13 doughnuts to 7 officers when he only has 28, well, I only have one thing to say to him: Good Luck. This is what he did: First he made 6 12s,then he added up all the 2s, then all the 1s, which made eight. I think he needs to go see Mr. Howard.

Article posted September 23, 2011 at 03:09 AM GMT • comment • Reads 58



Article posted October 6, 2011 at 10:53 PM GMT • comment • Reads 42

This video demonstrates incorrect multiplication. You can also do this with the numbers 8 and 15. Usually, 8 multiplied by 6 is 48. If you use their method though, it turns out like this…

15x8=40+8

That equals 48, I figured this out because you multiply 8 by the ones, then the tens, and you add them together and you get 48.

Article posted October 6, 2011 at 10:53 PM GMT • comment • Reads 42



Article posted September 22, 2011 at 01:41 AM GMT • comment • Reads 41

This certainly a math number bender. The only other pair of numbers of donuts that work with the 7 captains’ is 49 and 16! I figured this out by taking notes on the video and creating a excel spread sheet that does exactly what he does. I used this spread sheet to determine the only other pair of numbers that works. Try 49 and 16 I’m confident they work!

Article posted September 22, 2011 at 01:41 AM GMT • comment • Reads 41



Article posted September 27, 2011 at 06:00 PM GMT • comment • Reads 44

In the video, two men argue over how many donuts each officer gets if there are 7 officers and 28 donuts. The first man says that each officer gets 13 donuts each, while the other argues against him. At the end of the video, on there last attempt, the two simply take 7 13's and add them up. All they did was add each of the digits, when they really needed to add the actual numbers themselves, meaning they need to remember the differance between the ones and tens. For each officer to actually get 13 donuts, the chef would have to bake 91 donuts.So then police officer would have to pick a differnt nummber of donuts or the chef would have to bake 91 donuts.

Article posted September 27, 2011 at 06:00 PM GMT • comment • Reads 44



Article posted October 4, 2011 at 11:19 PM GMT • comment • Reads 44

What happened in the video is that the baker made 28 donuts and he is saying that each of the 7 officers can have 13 donuts, but the other guy argues against that. Each officer should have 4 donuts. How I figured that out is I saw how many times 7 go into 28 and it goes into there 4 times, so that means that each officer gets 28 donuts.:)

Article posted October 4, 2011 at 11:19 PM GMT • comment • Reads 44



Article posted September 23, 2011 at 01:01 AM GMT • comment • Reads 48

(Video 1) 13 cannot be multiplied by 7 because you would have 91. See you have 28 drinks and you have 7 groups, how many will you have each? Well the answer is 4. 28÷7=4. lllllll lllllll lllllll lllllll

(Video2) 14 cannot be multiplied by 5 because you would get 70. See you now have 5 drinks and you have 5 groups, how many will you have each? Well the answer is 5. 25÷5=5. E= people. eeeee eeeee eeeee eeeee eeee



Article posted September 23, 2011 at 01:01 AM GMT • comment • Reads 48



Article posted September 21, 2011 at 04:09 AM GMT • comment • Reads 63

The baker who made the donuts is completely sure that he made 28 donuts and he has to give the same amount of donuts to 7 offices. He thinks that 28 divided by 7 is 13 and his co-worker thinks he is wrong, and he won't listen, but he should because HE'S WRONG! First of all, 28 divided by 7 is not 13! It is 4. So, if he wanted to give each of the seven offices the same amount of donuts, he would have to give them each 4 donuts. If the baker wanted to give each office 13 donuts, he would have to make 91 donuts! That's a lot of donuts!

Article posted September 21, 2011 at 04:09 AM GMT • comment • Reads 63



Article posted September 22, 2011 at 11:42 PM GMT • comment • Reads 47

In the videos, the people had a hard time keeping numbers straight. For example, when the two different men divided, they both divided the number in the ones place first. They should have divided the whole number instead. Then, they brought down the number in the tens place, which means they did the long division backwards. When you multiply, you are supposed to put a number at the end of the second product before you add both of them together. The people who multiplied in the videos did not do that, and that made the 210 a 21 and the 50 a 5. Last, but not least, when the people added, they did not count the tens in groups of ten. The tens became ones that were added into the ones place. I figured it out by comparing the videos to what I normally did in math. Every little number counts.

Article posted September 22, 2011 at 11:42 PM GMT • comment • Reads 47



Article posted September 28, 2011 at 03:20 AM GMT • comment • Reads 50

Silly Ways To Solve Math Problems



 



In the video the chef is kind of solving the problem correctly but it is not exactly the right way to solve the problem. I understand how he is trying to solve the problem. But if he were to use the ones as tens when he was adding he would have gotten the multiplication problem correct. Some other numbers that you can do this with are 13 & 7, 14 & 6, 15 & 5,or 16 & 4.If you where to us any of these problems and try to solve them the same way as the chef you would run into the same problem. In the second video the dad was trying to solve the problem the same way as the chef from the first video.

Article posted September 28, 2011 at 03:20 AM GMT • comment • Reads 50



Article posted September 27, 2011 at 01:15 AM GMT • comment • Reads 48

What I have seen is a guy who thinks 7 goes into 28, 13 times. He thought this because he did all of his math wrong. When they put down 13, 7 times he multiplied 3 by 7 and then added 7 and got 28. He was really dumb to think that.

Article posted September 27, 2011 at 01:15 AM GMT • comment • Reads 48



Article posted September 30, 2011 at 01:59 AM GMT • comment • Reads 57

The baker was completely opposite. I could find no other numbers that work besides 5 and 14 to go into 20.When it is really 5*5=25.

5(25)14

_0

20

Also he did almost everything wrong. In math you need to be able to explain your awnser and this person did that perfectly. But all his numbers are wrong, he did all the numers in the wrong place, and in the wrong order.

Article posted September 30, 2011 at 01:59 AM GMT • comment • Reads 57



Article posted September 25, 2011 at 08:22 PM GMT • comment • Reads 42

This is a funny video where they find interesting ways to solve a math problem. Only these math problems are answered wrong! In one part ofthe video, they add 13 7 times, but insted of adding the 3's then puting the answer done, they add the 3's then the 1's.

Article posted September 25, 2011 at 08:22 PM GMT • comment • Reads 42



Article posted September 21, 2011 at 12:49 AM GMT • comment • Reads 42

This is sooooooo complicated!!! (Sweat, sweat!) There are 28 donuts and 7 people. All you need to do to find out how many donuts each person gets is divide 28 by 7 which equals to 4! This is because when you multiply 7 by 4 it equals to 28. Other ways you could do this problem are: write down 7 four times and add them up, or make 28 tallies and make the tallies go into 7 groups. The easiest way to do this problem visually and kinesthetically is to put 7 donuts side by side, and just put one donut under each one until you run out of donuts!

Article posted September 21, 2011 at 12:49 AM GMT • comment • Reads 42



Article posted September 27, 2011 at 05:59 PM GMT • comment • Reads 64

Well, obviously, 7 times 4 equals 28. So if there are seven officers and 28 donuts, each officer gets 4 donuts. However if the baker actually made 91 donuts then each officer would get 13 as the baker originally thought. For example, if you did 12 times 8 in the baker’s way of solving then you could easily make the same mistake by adding the wrong way. Ergo you could accidentally end up with 24.

Article posted September 27, 2011 at 05:59 PM GMT • comment • Reads 64



Article posted September 23, 2011 at 02:40 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 59

They are doing a few things wrong like how on the division kind of thing you can’t just forget about the first # and go back to it that is not how you do it. Also, their adding is wrong because you can’t add the right side then the left side with it. They got all of that to work because the first # 7 goes into 8 the second # of 28 and then they subtracted the 7 from the 8 and dropped the 2 and went from there. You can use a lot of #’s with this, but all that I found out was 3, 24, and 17 with each other then 4, 28, and 25. Also, you can use 6, 36, 15 and 2, 20, 10. I figured this out by just guessing the first # then I knew what it went into and had that as the second # and found the third # by doing their math. Then, I made sure that it worked with the addition part and they did!

Article posted September 23, 2011 at 02:40 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 59



Article posted September 22, 2011 at 03:32 AM GMT • comment • Reads 53

In the video, the guy had a different way of doing division, and than proved his method by adding in a weird way. When he divided seven into twenty-eight, seven couldn't go into two but it did go into eight one time so he wrote down one and then placed the two in front of the one to make it twenty-one, and seven went into that three times, so the answer was thirteen. Then he checked his answer by writing thirteen seven times and adding each column of numbers and he put down the overall total which was twenty-eight. Another problem that I figured out is that four goes into thirty-six eighteen times. I just tried out different even numbers until one worked. The guy was wrong because he didn't carry his numbers to the other column when he was adding, and when he did the long division, he put that seven goes into eight once, instead of seven into twenty-eight.

Article posted September 22, 2011 at 03:32 AM GMT • comment • Reads 53



Article posted September 23, 2011 at 01:10 AM GMT • comment • Reads 52

The math the guy did was funny. It was crazy how he new what numbers to use. I wish everyday math could be like that, but it would be pretty hard to remember! The other numbers you can use in this case would be 4, 24 and 15. I discovered you could use these numbers by trial and error. I picked two numbers where one divided into the other evenly and just tried it.

Article posted September 23, 2011 at 01:10 AM GMT • comment • Reads 52



Article posted September 27, 2011 at 12:12 AM GMT • comment • Reads 50

This is very confusing I had to watch it a few times to get it 5x5=25 but 14+14+14+14+14 is not 25 because he added the tens onto the ones.

Article posted September 27, 2011 at 12:12 AM GMT • comment • Reads 50



Article posted September 20, 2011 at 02:29 AM GMT • comment • Reads 64

That was hilarious. I checked out the math for myself and his calculations are correct like the process he did it in, but we were taught a different way otherwise known as the correct way. You can also get the “right” answer with these numbers, 48 doughnuts, 8 officers, and 15 doughnuts each. I got these numbers by using guess and check I started with 39 doughnuts, 8 officers, and 12 each and so I did the math and the answer didn’t work out so I tried numbers higher than that. I then tried 18 doughnuts, 6 officers, and 5 each and so on. I think to do the division for this, you have to have the right numbers, so for the numbers I picked which are 48, 8, and 15. You start with division you are dividing 48 by 8 and you'll end up with 15 like how the guy in the video ended up 13 doughnuts for each officer, 7 officers, and 28 doughnuts. Ok so we're dividing 48 by 8 and 8 doesn't go into 4 so set the 4 to the side like you're pretending to hold it. Then 8 goes into 8 one time, drop the 8 off under the 8 in 48. Then bring the 4 down and you will have the number 40 and 8 goes into 40 five times so your total will be 15 doughnuts.

Article posted September 20, 2011 at 02:29 AM GMT • comment • Reads 64



Article posted September 23, 2011 at 02:05 AM GMT • comment • Reads 53

Well, first of all I have to mention that the guy is an idiot and there is no mathematical explanation for being an idiot! A mathematical response as to what they did wrong is on the adding they added up the threes and then the ones WITH the ones… they didn’t count them separately like they are supposed to do. With the division they save the two for later and they’re not supposed to do that and they ended up getting the answer the fat guy wanted to get. Finally, the multiplication when wrong when the fat guy wanted to put twenty- one below the line instead of putting the one below the line and putting the two above the seven, then they added eight because seven times one is seven. All in all it is the wrong answer but it works.

Another number that works is 14 into 25. I figured this out the same way that they did in the video but with different numbers. I had to try it with a few numbers though to find 25.

Article posted September 23, 2011 at 02:05 AM GMT • comment • Reads 53



Article posted September 23, 2011 at 11:40 PM GMT • comment • Reads 50

The people in the video (the parents and the chef) have multiple problems with their math. In their division, they skipped the 2 in both videos and moved on to the second number as an individual. They should have gone on to add the second number on the end to make a 2 digit number then divide from that. In multiplication, both people did the first step right. Then the chef forgot, when he multiplied the 7 by the 1, that the 1 was actually a 10, so he got 7 instead of 70.  In the other video, the mom made the same mistake with the 1 and the 5. In addition, both counted the 1’s column correctly but again, the 10’s column was counted as 1’s instead. This can work for any one digit number and two digit number that the first digit in the two digit number is smaller than the one digit number. Also, the second digit of the two digit number has to be smaller than the one digit number. The two digit number also has to be divisible by the one digit number for it to be a trick. For example, 48÷6 could work

Article posted September 23, 2011 at 11:40 PM GMT • comment • Reads 50



Article posted September 26, 2011 at 02:53 PM GMT • comment • Reads 45

   The way they solved the problem was very clever! Instead of counting the tens as tens they counted the tens as ones. In both ways they forgot that the ones or twos that they "saved" for later were actually tens. Another one that would work is if you had 6 people to feed and 48 dougnuts and they each got 17. Try it!

Article posted September 26, 2011 at 02:53 PM GMT • comment • Reads 45



Article posted October 5, 2011 at 11:48 PM GMT • comment • Reads 61

 



That is unbelievable! I HONESTLY have no idea what to say! All of the things that each person said made sense, but only one person was right. All of the math was right, but each person was setting it up incorrectly. When each person took their stab at the math equation they appeared to be right. The only difference is the fact that the people weren't sticking to the order of operations.

Article posted October 5, 2011 at 11:48 PM GMT • comment • Reads 61



Article posted September 24, 2011 at 01:01 AM GMT • comment • Reads 54

The baker did the wrong equation, the problem he did was: 13 x 7 = 28. The sailer did the correct equation 7x4=28, that is right way to do it. You could rather do 7+7+7+7 or 4+4+4+4+4+4+4 either way would work for the baker. So the sailer was correct and the baker was incorrect.

Article posted September 24, 2011 at 01:01 AM GMT • comment • Reads 54



Article posted September 25, 2011 at 01:53 AM GMT • comment • Reads 68

In the video, a baker is claiming he has 28 doughnuts with 7 officers who, he claims, should have 13 apiece. Another baker tries to prove him wrong, trying to show that 4 x 7= 28 instead of 13 x 7, but in the end, the first baker outsmarts him. But there is a slight hitch. When he divided, he held the 2 in 28 until later, where he had already put a 1 (which was also incorrect) and he used the 2 to create 21, and 7 goes into 21 x3, so it created 13. He cheated a bit here and stretched the rules of math a little to hold the 2 when there was no reason necessary. When he multiplied, he did everything right until it came to the adding part. He used incorrect place value because when he got down to 21, instead of adding the zero to hold the place value to the number you add to 21, he just put it in the ones place instead of the tens, which made it 7, making it 21 + 7, equaling 28. When he added 13 x7 times, the second baker added up all the 3’s correctly, but the first baker just added up all the 1’s in a row to create 28. In the other video, what the other people did was similar too. They found little ways to slither out of the rules of math like the baker did and stick to what they said instead of having to admit the other person was correct. Another way they can do this is by this:



Like the 1st baker said,

7 x 4 DOES= 28 because there is no possible way for 13 x 7= 28 because

13 x 2= 26 which is almost already more than 28 and 13 x 3= 39, WAY more than 28 already.

Article posted September 25, 2011 at 01:53 AM GMT • comment • Reads 68



Article posted September 27, 2011 at 03:43 AM GMT • comment • Reads 48

So to me the math thing was kind of confusing. I watched the math doughnuts one. The chef who was making the doughnuts and who was planning on giving the doughnuts to the policemen was counting and multiplying wrong. The man who was helping was doing the it the right way. I dont think the chef paid very well attention at school.

Article posted September 27, 2011 at 03:43 AM GMT • comment • Reads 48



Article posted September 26, 2011 at 11:17 PM GMT • comment • Reads 47

Both of the guys who do the math a different way are wrong. They make it seem like they're right by adding and multiplying the math in a different way. The woman did it wrong because she multiplied 5 by 20 and 5 by 1 and added those two. Another problems that works with their math is 4 muliplied by 15 to get 24. It's really 4 by 6 but with they way they do it, it would be 15.

Article posted September 26, 2011 at 11:17 PM GMT • comment • Reads 47



Article posted September 21, 2011 at 05:07 AM GMT • comment • Reads 47

That video was funny and here is what I thought about it. I saw that the guy that was explaining was trying to use the tens as ones. Other numbers you could use are 8*15=48 because I did what he did on a peice of paper. That second guy knew what he was doing but he couldn't get through to the first man.

Article posted September 21, 2011 at 05:07 AM GMT • comment • Reads 47



Article posted September 24, 2011 at 06:32 AM GMT • comment • Reads 54

The baker did the wrong way of solving the problem. When he "tried" to add the numbers up the other guy who was saying he was wrong added all the numbers on the right side. Then, the baker added all the numbers on the left side to the total from the right. Some numbers that would work for this are: 3 and 17, 6 and 12,and 4 and 18. These were some of the numbers I found that worked.

Article posted September 24, 2011 at 06:32 AM GMT • comment • Reads 54



Article posted September 25, 2011 at 09:55 PM GMT • comment • Reads 65

 



The way you are supposed to do the math problem 7/28 is you put 7 outside the house and 28 inside the house like they did in the beginning, but where they went wrong was when he said he was not going to use the two........ YOU HAVE TO USE THE TWO=http://!So since 7 cannot go into two you make it 28 and what is 28 minus twenty eight 0!! So, 7 goes into 28 4 times not like the gentlemen thought in the video.

Article posted September 25, 2011 at 09:55 PM GMT • comment • Reads 65



Article posted October 2, 2011 at 10:53 PM GMT • comment • Reads 40

When I saw this video I thought it was really funny and confusing. Well, when you multiply 7*13 the answer is not 28. The real answer is 91. You can add 13 seven times or you can multiply it in a column. The sailor did not know how to multiply. Thats why he didn't have the numbers right.

Article posted October 2, 2011 at 10:53 PM GMT • comment • Reads 40



Article posted September 30, 2011 at 03:33 AM GMT • comment • Reads 40

Whoa, those guys never did go to school, did they, now? You can't do 13x7! It's sum is... Well, I don't know, but it's certainly not 28! Here's what happened-

The guy did it like this:

13 22 21

13 23 18

13 24 15

13 25 12

13 26 9

13 27 6

13 28 3

_______

2 8



See how that doesn't work? What should've happened:

13

13

13

13

13

13

13

__

91



See? Makes no sense how he did it. He just wanted to be correct. 7x4 really does equal 28, so think about that, guy who's wrong!

~Greeny

Article posted September 30, 2011 at 03:33 AM GMT • comment • Reads 40



Article posted September 26, 2011 at 02:43 AM GMT • comment • Reads 40

This is a very funny video. Billy is actually doing the equation correctly 25% divided equally by 5 means each person should get 5%. Billy also does the equation correctly 5x5=25.



The way Pa does the equation is incorrect. Pa divides 25 by 5 but he gets 14 as the answer which is wrong. Pa says that 5 won’t go into 2 but it will go into 5 once. Pa then says 5-5 =0. He then says that since he didn’t use the 2 he brings it down and puts the 2 in front of the 0 to make 20. Pa then divides 20 / 5 which = 4. Pa then puts the 1 in front of the 4 and gets 14.



Ma also does the problem incorrectly. Ma says 5x14=25 which wrong. Ma first does 5x4=20 and then 5x1=5 she adds them together to get 25.

Billy tries to show Ma and Pa that 14+14+14+14+14 does not equal 25 but Pa does incorrectly to make it equal 25. Pa adds 4+4+4+4+4 to get 20 and then 1+1+1+1+1 to get five and then adds 20+5 to get 25.



Ma and Pa’s crazy math will also work with 4 and 36. If there are 36 brownies and they needed to be divided equally by 4 people each person will get 9 brownies. Using Pa’s and Ma’s math they would each get 18 brownies.

Article posted September 26, 2011 at 02:43 AM GMT • comment • Reads 40



Article posted September 22, 2011 at 02:51 AM GMT • comment • Reads 49

I think that the math for the 28 doughnuts makes sense but if you add 7 13 times, you will get a different number. If you add 7 4 times, you will get 28. you can't multiply a teen number because it always turn out wrong. 7 times 13 is 91. I figured it out by using a calculator.

Article posted September 22, 2011 at 02:51 AM GMT • comment • Reads 49



Article posted September 30, 2011 at 03:27 AM GMT • comment • Reads 45

In this video there are 3 guys fighting over how many doughnuts each officer will get. There were 7 officers and 28 doughnuts. The doughnut maker's error was that he took the 28 doughnuts and 7 officers and instead of dividing to get four, he gave the two to a guy to hold. He put 7 into 8 one time and got the three by adding to 2 to the remainder (1). You can make this mistake by adding ANY two numbers together instead of dividing them correctly.

Article posted September 30, 2011 at 03:27 AM GMT • comment • Reads 45



Article posted September 22, 2011 at 11:34 PM GMT • comment • Reads 46

Well the baker in the video thinks that 7  goes into 28 13 times. Well we all now is wrong but how? Well he did his math wrong. Down below is his math and next to it is mine. All the corrections are in bold.


 


His:                                      Mine:


7)28)13                                7)28)1+3=4


    -7                                           -7


     -                                             -


    21                                          21


   -21                                        -21


     -                                             -


     0                                           0


Get it? Well if you didn't both of the people in the videos made the same mistake. They didn't add there answers. So instead of 13 it would be 4.

Article posted September 22, 2011 at 11:34 PM GMT • comment • Reads 46



Article posted September 22, 2011 at 02:41 AM GMT • comment • Reads 48

I saw the baker doing the wrong equation when he did 13 * 7 = 28. He should have done what the sailer did 7 * 4 = 28 instead of what he did. You could also do 7+7+7+7 or 4+4+4+4+4+4+4 too.

Article posted September 22, 2011 at 02:41 AM GMT • comment • Reads 48



Article posted September 22, 2011 at 11:15 PM GMT • comment • Reads 52

The problem with these mathmetitions is they are not adding the the extra 1 in division to the ones column, and when the other person writes that number however many times that they are multiplying by, they add the tens in as if they were ones.

Article posted September 22, 2011 at 11:15 PM GMT • comment • Reads 52



Article posted September 22, 2011 at 03:37 AM GMT • comment • Reads 44

This was an awesome math video, and it’s very humorous too. The guy made you believe that his thinking was true. In his division he uses the two and the eight separately instead of dividing it by twenty-eight itself. He should have done twenty-eight divided by seven. The multiplication, he did three times seven and that equaled twenty-one, then he did seven times one and equaled seven. He added twenty-one and seven that equaled twenty-eight. What he should have done was thirteen times seven and not added, but carries the two from the twenty- one to the seven. That would equal ninety-one. The addition part was a very cool way too. He put down thirteen, seven times. When he added all the threes then he added the ones to it.



If I do his way then I can also do it with fifteen. I figured out that the first digit has to be smaller than the number that’s being divided, and the second number has to be bigger. Fifteen and three work to equal eighteen!

Article posted September 22, 2011 at 03:37 AM GMT • comment • Reads 44



Article posted September 26, 2011 at 11:35 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 41

I think this video is funny because the chef is doing his math wrong. He was seeing the tens place as a one. If you do this with six and fourty, you would get twenty- four, because 6*4=24, and 6*0=0. Then you add twenty-four plus zero to get the answer. (24)

Article posted September 26, 2011 at 11:35 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 41



Article posted October 2, 2011 at 09:59 PM GMT • comment • Reads 38





The first thing wrong in this video is that the chef thinks that 7x13=28. Even though this is wrong he makes it look like this is the correct answer. One place where he went wrong was when he was writing out the multiplication on the chalk board. Apparently he believes that you can "reuse" numbers so he used the 2 again without the other guy realizing it. the next thing he did wrong was in the addition where he didn't carry the two. If he had carried the 2 he would have gotten 91. Other possible equations would include,



 



6,12=18



 5,14=25.              



 





 

Article posted October 2, 2011 at 09:59 PM GMT • comment • Reads 38



Article posted October 5, 2011 at 11:58 PM GMT • comment • Reads 59

The old man is totally wrong in this video. You see, he said that 5 doesn't go into 2, which it doesn't. But he was supposed to put the 0 in the quotient, but instead, he skipped to 5 by itself instead of doing 25, which then got him 1. And then since he didn't use the 2, he brings it down to were it is 20, and says that 5 goes into 20 four times. Bringing the wrong answer of 14.

Article posted October 5, 2011 at 11:58 PM GMT • comment • Reads 59



Article posted September 25, 2011 at 12:39 AM GMT • comment • Reads 63

Costello is wrong. When you multiply 7 by 4 it is 28, not 7 by 14. Costello is wrong because when dividing you can't hold a number. Also when he added 14 he counted the one's place correct but not the ten's place correct. Another set of numbers you could use it 8x15=48. You could find this out very easily.



The problem would be set up like this: XY+X=Z



X= the multiplier



Y= the ones digit



X and Y have to be one of the digits 1-9.



For Example:



X=8



Y=5



8x5+8=48



8x15=48    



Article posted September 25, 2011 at 12:39 AM GMT • comment • Reads 63



Article posted September 23, 2011 at 02:37 AM GMT • comment • Reads 57

Once I saw the videos about math, I understood exactly what he was doing wrong. He had twenty-eight donuts and he thought that seven times thirteen is twenty-eight. Therefore, when he showed the other people on the chalk board, He divided seven into twenty-eight and he got one for the first step. Then, he “re-used” the two from before. That gave him twenty-one. After that he stated that seven goes into twenty-one, three times. That’s how he got thirteen. In math you just can’t “re-use” numbers. If it can’t go in to one number, you move on and continue the equation. He messed up, so the officers will get less donuts than what they were expecting.

Article posted September 23, 2011 at 02:37 AM GMT • comment • Reads 57



Article posted September 21, 2011 at 03:13 AM GMT • comment • Reads 50



That short guy is not smart. (I was going to say stupid but Mrs.Lubich wouldn't like it) 4x7=28 because



1x7=7



2x7=14



3x7=21



4x7=28



I'm in algebra 1B, I should know this, in fact everyone in middle school should know this. You could also do it with 2x14.



Article posted September 21, 2011 at 03:13 AM GMT • comment • Reads 50



Article posted October 4, 2011 at 03:38 AM GMT • comment • Reads 48

In this video a very unintelligent man is arguing with another man about the amount of donuts that each officer gets. While the unintelligent man argues that 13 goes into 28 7 times the other man is arguing that only 4 goes into 28 7 times. What the unintelligent man was doing wrong was he was using the wrong method of math. Instead of adding 13 as a whole he added the individual digits, the ones place and the tens place, so he added 1+1+1+1+1+1+1+3+3+3+3+3+3+3=28.

Article posted October 4, 2011 at 03:38 AM GMT • comment • Reads 48



Article posted September 20, 2011 at 11:09 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 59

Seven times thirteen is twenty-eight!? Ridiculous! The cook totally tricks the other guy with his math. In proper math, you add up the second numbers and then carry over, not just add all the numbers you see! I figured out that you can do this with any number that has two digits. For the division part to work, the second digit must be divisible by the number you’re dividing with and the first one must be less than the number you’re dividing by. Still, with these two rules, I only found one combination that works, and that’s the video’s.

Article posted September 20, 2011 at 11:09 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 59



Article posted September 28, 2011 at 03:05 AM GMT • comment • Reads 47

Video one: The chef is incorrect because he is doing every crazy thing he can except correct multiplication. He even does addition wrong. If he had even added up the seven 13s correctly he would have had the right answer of 91.



Video two: The man is doing the same thing in this video as the chef in video one. He isn't multipling or dividding correctly. If he was doning the problem correct the answer would be 70.

Article posted September 28, 2011 at 03:05 AM GMT • comment • Reads 47



Article posted September 29, 2011 at 03:46 AM GMT • comment • Reads 44

What I saw was one man prepared 28 doughnuts for seven officers and he thought he could divide it so that each officer got 13. Witch was…wrong, for it to be right each officer would have to have four. At first he took away the two and put 7 into 8 with the remainder of 1, then put the two back making it 21, witch he was suppose to not take out the 2 and just put 7 into 28. He then divided 21 by 7 that equaled 3 making it 13.Another thing he did was try to add up 13 seven times but he didn’t carry the 2 and he just added the seven ones making it 28. This trick would also work with 25,14,and 5.

Article posted September 29, 2011 at 03:46 AM GMT • comment • Reads 44



Article posted September 21, 2011 at 01:28 AM GMT • comment • Reads 57



If you have 28 donuts, and 7 officers how many do they each get? 13! That’s right. And if you have 3 officers, and 24 donuts, how many do they each get? 17! You are probably wondering how on Earth this is true, well, here’s how: First, division: our problem is 24÷3. The 3 doesn’t go into 2 but it goes into 4 1 time. 3x1=3, and 4-3=1. Now you put the 2 back and have 21. 3 goes into 21 7 times so you put the 7 by the 1, and now you have 17. Now, we will check with multiplication. Put the 17 on top and the 3 on bottom. 7x3=21. 3x1=3. 21+3=24. Now we will finish with addition, 17 3 times. Add up all the 7s. (21). Now add the 3 1s. 21222324That is how you get 3x17=24




Article posted September 21, 2011 at 01:28 AM GMT • comment • Reads 57



Article posted October 4, 2011 at 03:49 AM GMT • comment • Reads 49

I understand where they get this answer but they did the division wrong, for example 21/7. You take 7 and the long way would to multiply it by 1 more till you get 21, 7x1=7,7x2=14, and 7x3=21. To make it even longer you can add. 7+7=14, and 7+7=14+7=21.

Article posted October 4, 2011 at 03:49 AM GMT • comment • Reads 49



Article posted September 23, 2011 at 03:59 PM GMT • comment • Reads 51

When you are multiplying 7x3 the answer will not be 28, it will be 91. You can add 13 7 times or just simply multiply it in a column. The man in the video did not really know is multiplication tables. That’s why he keep getting the wrong answer.

Article posted September 23, 2011 at 03:59 PM GMT • comment • Reads 51



Article posted September 22, 2011 at 11:56 PM GMT • comment • Reads 42

When I first saw that video I was very impressed with the fact that one of the sailors could be so persuasive that he could convince you of thinking that seven times thirteen equals 28.He did it in division multiplication and addition! Now obviously, he was wrong because if he were to take 7 sailors and feed them 13 doughnuts each, he would have to bake a lot more donuts,66 more to be exact.(I hope I did my math right.)

Article posted September 22, 2011 at 11:56 PM GMT • comment • Reads 42



Article posted September 21, 2011 at 04:19 AM GMT • comment • Reads 44

It took me 3 times to get it, but it totally makes since now. That guy just multiplied backwards. 7 does go into 28, 13 times if you multiply it in reverse. This also works with 3 and 15. 3 will not go into 1, so we will save the 1 for later. Now we subtract 3 from 5 and we get 2. Now we are going to use the one, we’ll put it in front of the 2, and we get 12. 3 goes into 12, 4 times, so this equals 14. 3 goes into 15, 14 times.

Article posted September 21, 2011 at 04:19 AM GMT • comment • Reads 44



Article posted October 5, 2011 at 04:17 PM GMT • comment • Reads 44

I thought the video was funny but I had to watch the a couple times to understand. See he was wrong 7 *13 = 91. 7*12=25. The way I got that is there are 7 officers and 25 daunts if you divide 7 & 25 you get 12 that means each person gets 12.

Article posted October 5, 2011 at 04:17 PM GMT • comment • Reads 44



Article posted October 4, 2011 at 01:52 AM GMT • comment • Reads 70

In the first video the man baked 28 donuts and he has to split them up between 7 people. The man is saying that they each get 13 donuts. He is saying that 28/7 is 13. He said 7 does not go into 2 but it goes into 8, 1 time, and since you didn’t use the 2, he brought it back and said 7 goes into 21 3 times, so he says its 13. Each person should get 4 donuts because 21/4 equals 7.

In the second video the man was splitting up 25 % of his parent’s fortune between 5 people. The parents thought it was 14% the parents said 14x5 is 25.

He did 4x5 and 1x5 and he got 25 because 4x5 is 20 and 1x5 is 5. It should be 5%.

Article posted October 4, 2011 at 01:52 AM GMT • comment • Reads 70



Article posted September 21, 2011 at 11:24 PM GMT • comment • Reads 48

The guy [Chef] on the video did this by not carrying the numbers correctly. Chef skipped numbers and added them later, completely ruining the answer. Continuing with his logic 3 goes into 24 14 times. It didn’t take me long at all to solve it. At first I thought he added the 1 and 3 together to get for but then I saw that all Chef did was not carrying his numbers correctly.

Article posted September 21, 2011 at 11:24 PM GMT • comment • Reads 48



Article posted September 23, 2011 at 02:48 AM GMT • comment • Reads 49

In the video it showed a guy having 28 donuts for 7 military and he said each of them would get 13 donuts but the other guys didn't believe him. I have found some ways to get 28 and they are multiplying 7 by 4 or adding 7 four times another way to get 28 is by adding 13 seven times. I think he is wrong because 7 military people cannot get 13 donuts if he made 28.

Article posted September 23, 2011 at 02:48 AM GMT • comment • Reads 49



Article posted September 23, 2011 at 11:40 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 45

I thought that the guys in the video were like the three stooges. They were all kind of stupid except for the tall guy that says that 7 x 4 = 28. He is right.The short baker guy is wrong. He says that 7 x 13 = 28. The way he did the math was weird because he got it wrong each time. He forgot to carry numbers. 



My way:                                            His way:



1x7=7                                              13



2x7=14                                             x                                                 > wrong



3x7=21                                             7



4x7=28                                            _________This is the right way to do it. Whoever told him the way to do math this way was not very smart. My way works because it is just the right way to do math. You aren't supposed to do math the way that he did it. Some other other numbers that work are 14 and 6 into 30. Just ask Mr. Howard because he knows more about it than I do.                                

Article posted September 23, 2011 at 11:40 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 45



Article posted September 22, 2011 at 12:50 AM GMT • comment • Reads 51

What I have seen that was "mathematical" was that the person was counting wrong. You can also do this with 5 and 14. I know this because

5)25(14

5

20

21=14=4

22=14=8

23=14=12

24=14=16

25=14=20

I did this before I watched the second one. ^.^

Article posted September 22, 2011 at 12:50 AM GMT • comment • Reads 51



Article posted September 23, 2011 at 03:58 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 50

When multiplying 7*13 the answer is not 28. The answer is actually 91. You can add 13 seven times or you can multiply it in a column. The man in the video did not really know his multiplication facts and that’s why he kept getting the wrong answer.

Article posted September 23, 2011 at 03:58 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 50



Article posted September 20, 2011 at 11:07 PM GMT • comment • Reads 42



 



 





 





From Abbott and Costello. I get it and I know how Abbott got 13 out of 28.Abbott got 13 out of 28 because when he was dividing he thought that he couldn’t use the 2 the first time so he first said 7 into 8 equals 1. Then, he subtracted 7 from 28 and got 21. He then asked Costello how many times 7 goes into 21. The other guys said 3 right? Well that’s how he got 13 out of 28. You could also do this with the number 25.





 

Article posted September 20, 2011 at 11:07 PM GMT • comment • Reads 42



Article posted September 21, 2011 at 12:52 AM GMT • comment • Reads 54

When watching this video I was very confused. I watched it a second time, but I still felt the same way. Then I ask my parents to watch video as well. My dad understood what was going on, and explained it to me. He started with a number that was a multiple of seven. When you add 7 to the number, the number in the ones column had to be bigger than seven and the number in the tens column has to be smaller than seven. Through trial and error, he came up with 49. Since 7 can’t go into 4, you put that off to the side for later. 7 can go into 9 so 9-7=2. Now you bring back the 4 and that makes 42. 42-42=0. Therefore, 16 X 7=49. To check your work, you can do that by adding 16 (7) times (16+16+16+16+16+16+16=49). 6 X 7= 42 + 7 (1’s)= 49. After trying this process several more times, I also learned that you could use this algorithm with almost any number as long as the rule applies. For example: 3 X 17=24, 6 X 17=49, 7 X 16=49, and 3 X 17=24.

Article posted September 21, 2011 at 12:52 AM GMT • comment • Reads 54



Article posted September 22, 2011 at 10:39 PM GMT • comment • Reads 39

In both videos, there were equations that didn’t make sense. In the baking video, the impossible problem was that seven times thirteen equals twenty-eight. Also, in the other video, the equation was five times fourteen equals twenty-five. Neither of these two mathematical problems are true! Their sense in these solutions does not and cannot be correct! On a math test they would get F’s because that is not the way how to multiply, add and divide.Also, the equation three times blank equals fifteen would work. I solved this mentally by uswing my head and the equation could work.

Article posted September 22, 2011 at 10:39 PM GMT • comment • Reads 39



Article posted September 21, 2011 at 12:20 AM GMT • comment • Reads 48

I don't agree that 28/7=13 because I understand the guy's logic, but he is wrong. It's just like 25/5=14. I figured that 25/5=14 because a saw a You Tube video like this one a couple months ago. 15/3=14 works, too, because I found the pattern on how to find equations like these.

Article posted September 21, 2011 at 12:20 AM GMT • comment • Reads 48



Article posted September 23, 2011 at 04:19 AM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 51

 



Although this video was tricky to figure out, I finally got it. What happened was that they did not “carry over”. The easiest way for me to explain this is by addition. If you have a lot of numbers like they did you have to do something special when you add. First you add the ones column. If the sum is more than ten you carry the tens value over to the tens column. What they did wrong is that they counted what should’ve been tens as ones. Another set of numbers that could work is 4x16=28; this is not true because 16x4 really equals 64.

Article posted September 23, 2011 at 04:19 AM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 51



Article posted September 27, 2011 at 02:36 AM GMT • comment • Reads 58

So the guy is trying to prove that 7 goes into 28 13 times but its not possible so instead of him using the 2 right away he kept which in real life you cant do. so there for he is wrong on that. Also he cant just add the digits you have add the numbers so he only added the digits so again he is wrong.

Article posted September 27, 2011 at 02:36 AM GMT • comment • Reads 58



Article posted September 23, 2011 at 02:34 AM GMT • comment • Reads 43

These "geniuses" show they aren't completely empty-minded, but, there is an easy way of proving them wrong. If you try adding 7 together 13 times using their method your answer would be 104. That proves that this method doesn't work. Another pair of numbers this does work for is 3 times 18. As shown in the videos, 6) 36 (15. 6 doesn't go into 3, but it goes into 6 once(that is where you get the 1 in 15). The 6 in 36 minus 6 is 0. You bring the 3 from 36 down it is 30. 6 goes into 30, 5 times(that's where the 5 in 15 comes from), so 36 divided by 6 is 15.

Article posted September 23, 2011 at 02:34 AM GMT • comment • Reads 43



Article posted September 24, 2011 at 02:21 AM GMT • comment • Reads 67

The guy who was explaining how to do the math incorrectly was obviously wrong. The way he screwed up with the division is taking out the two and adding it back in later. The way with he flopped with the addition was adding the tens and ones together instead of separately. Finally, the way he failed with the multiplication is that he did not carry his tens. I have tried many numbers, such as 4 into 26 and other numbers like that. None of them however worked. After doing math wrong on purpose, I hope I don’t screw up in Mr. Howard’s class.

Article posted September 24, 2011 at 02:21 AM GMT • comment • Reads 67



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