Login
Copyright (c) 2014 by Conditions of Use    Privacy Policy Return to Blogmeister
-- Blogmeister

by

Teacher Assignments
Teacher Entries
Student Entries

Title: ()
Description:

Article posted November 16, 2011 at 02:15 AM GMT • comment • Reads 92

In my opinion the perfect setting for a mystery story is in a large banquet for example. in this instance the banquet hall holding a multitude of people would go into complete lockdown therefore completing a completely closed setting. the detective might come bursting in and interview a large group of people while not letting anyone leave so that you have a certain group that the criminal is from and a certain place that he or she is conatained in.

Article posted November 16, 2011 at 02:15 AM GMT • comment • Reads 92



Article posted November 14, 2011 at 02:09 AM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 43

A perfect setting for a mystery is scary, spooky, and makes you look behind your shoulder to see if anything is there. I think that a perfect setting for a mystey would be in the middle of the woods at midnight. This is a good setting because many weird things happen in the woods. Here is a description. A dark pine woods on a Saturday night, only the charecter is out in the woods. They are all alone aand here so many creepy sounds. This is my description of a mysterious setting and why it would be perfect. 

Article posted November 14, 2011 at 02:09 AM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 43



Article posted November 16, 2011 at 05:02 AM GMT • comment • Reads 42

What makes a good mystery setting? Plenty of examples surround us, even when we don't see them. Take a foggy day. As you sit at the window a strange man dressed in a black overcoat, wearing sunglasses and a black hat walks by, and a thousand questions fly through your head. Who is he? What is he doing? Where is he going? Another example comes from a video game about dogfighting. On the mission, your job is to escort three aircraft carriers through a pass. Then, the enemy attacks, and its a foggy day, where you cant see more than 20 feet in front.That just yells at me, "Mystery!", and I might be assuming too much, but when someone attacks you or your crew, on a foggy day, something isn't right. I guess that I'm just trying to say that you want mysteries, you don't have to go far to get them. Just be vigilant and you'll be a sherlock holmes in no time.

Article posted November 16, 2011 at 05:02 AM GMT • comment • Reads 42



Article posted November 16, 2011 at 02:14 AM GMT • comment • Reads 35

I think the perfect setting for a mystery story. For many people, that wouldn't be their choice but you really have to think outside of the box for this one. You have to have some ideas about space and other people to see how they would have reacted in that situation. So it could be time travel, teleportation, or just a modern rocket. There are some other ideas that you personaly can come up with that may realate to mine but that's what I came up with.

Article posted November 16, 2011 at 02:14 AM GMT • comment • Reads 35



Article posted November 17, 2011 at 01:23 AM GMT • comment (2) • Reads 35

an amazing setting to a closed story would be...it was a cold and eerie night and the clouds were coming in . Mrs Jackson was walking on the sidewalk sipping on a glass of tea. there was nothing to be heard exept the sound of a light hum. "were is he" she stated "its getting late." Almost as though he'd been waiting for her to say that a black cadiliac rolled up. she hoped in and started the conversation. "look i've dug up some dirt on lenord" she wisperd

"really whats that." said he " well i dogged his trail and i found him pull up at the victims house i heard some banging and then he left."

"thats pecullar did he take any thing"

"not that i know of"

just then the car started shaking back and forth the driver screemed then hit a tree.



THE END

Article posted November 17, 2011 at 01:23 AM GMT • comment (2) • Reads 35



Article posted November 8, 2011 at 10:29 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 41

The perfect "closed setting" for a mystery story would definitely be something dark and something gloomy. It shouldn't be all rainbows and unicorns, or else the reader won't be interested or eager to find out more. Take The Hound of the Baskervilles, for an example. The setting right now is pretty creepy, the Baskerville Hall all big and scary, with no one else around. And, the fact that when we ended, Watson heard a woman crying, when trying to fall asleep in his bedroom. Without the dark setting, the mystery just wouldn't be as exciting or as thrilling as it should be. Setting, in my opinion, is the key to a great mystery novel.

Article posted November 8, 2011 at 10:29 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 41



Article posted November 15, 2011 at 11:29 PM GMT • comment • Reads 40

   In Language Arts, we have been reading mystery stories lately. The setting is important in a mystery, and a "closed setting" is the best. For example, our latest mystery, called The Hound of the Baskervilles, is all in one area, as are all the suspects.  The Hound of the Baskervilles is a Sherlock Holmes story by the genius Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.  It is set in Baskerville Hall, on the moor, at Grimpen MIre, and that immediate area.  A closed setting must be in one specific area, and that setting must be known to the reader.  For example, in the Hound story, Baskerville Hall is where the victim lived.  The moor is the scene of the crime, and Grimpen Mire is a deadly place.  Also, there must be likely suspects within the setting.  In The Hound of the Baskervilles, the suspects live in Baskerville Hall or near the moor.  Almost all of these people are possible suspects.  Finally, a mystery story with a good closed setting must introduce the setting.  The Hound story introduces the setting when characters arrive there.  The reader learns about the setting at the same time as the narrator, who is also a character, does.  The Hound of the Baskervilles is clearly a perfect example of a mystery stoyr with a closed setting.

Article posted November 15, 2011 at 11:29 PM GMT • comment • Reads 40



Article posted November 15, 2011 at 11:21 PM GMT • comment • Reads 38

In my opinion, the perfect "closed setting" for a mystery story would be in a jail cell. The setting would show the criminal all sad and locked up with lots of guards around him. I think that would be very satisfying for all the readers to see after the horrible things the criminal did. On the other hand, the perfect "closed setting" could be on a field where the main character and the criminal duel to the death, where the protagonist wins.

Article posted November 15, 2011 at 11:21 PM GMT • comment • Reads 38



Article posted November 16, 2011 at 04:51 AM GMT • comment • Reads 37

There are many things that I think make a good setting in a mystery. It wouldnt be a mystery with out supects. So, I think a good mystery needs lots and lots of suspects. The story also needs to be on edge and your mood should change every couple of minutes. When I think of a mystery setting I think of Darknees and creppy things. Liek black cats and dark clouds. The most important thing a good mystery setting needs is clues to make u think one thing although it may be misleading. Foe example, say the police found James finger print on the murder weapon although he really did not murder that person. People may have diffrent opinions what makes a good mystery setting but that was my opinion of what makes an amazing setting.

Article posted November 16, 2011 at 04:51 AM GMT • comment • Reads 37



Article posted November 16, 2011 at 11:08 PM GMT • comment • Reads 36

Something like the moore is one place i would hate to be at because i would be scared and any place like a dark alley or a graveyard always scares me . which is the mysterie about them when i think about haunted houses its always just weird

Article posted November 16, 2011 at 11:08 PM GMT • comment • Reads 36



Article posted November 16, 2011 at 03:49 AM GMT • comment • Reads 38

The perfect closed setting for a mystery would be in a neighborhood. I think that this would be perfect for a mystery because this setting is small enough that the clues and important information to the story are not to far away. Next, since it is a neighboorhood, it would be easy for the main character to talk to everyone and obtain information through everyone's eyes. Also, the clues within the neighborhood would probably narrow down the suspects to where there aren't many of them so that it would be easy for a red herring to suprise the reader. Another one would be that the suspects might be friends with the main character so that makes the mystery more interesting. So those are the reasons I think that a mystery would be great in a neighborhood.

Article posted November 16, 2011 at 03:49 AM GMT • comment • Reads 38



Article posted November 12, 2011 at 07:36 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 39

The setting in a mystery story matters a lot. It affects the whole plot and gives readers a chance to infer from it to find suspects. It betters the story and enables us to try and figure out the mystery ourselves. A perfect setting for the story would be in a place that seems suspenseful and mysterious to go along with the plot. It also needs to be closed though because if the story occurred around the whole world, it would be next to impossible for us to actually know or find out who the criminal is. Clues and leftover objects need to be in the setting too. This way, we are able to put the pieces together and it would make the story more realistic. All of these things help the story to be more interesting to read. I think that the perfect setting would be at an outdoor place where eery things occur but where an ominous plot also emerges from it. It should also be near where people associated with the crime live. This way, it can show us many reasons why the crime would be committed. Then these things can work together to better the story. I especially enjoyed the setting in The Hound of the Baskervilles because of the creepy surroundings. The curse is very mysterious, the moor and neighborhood has a strange feel about it, and the house also explains about the rich inhabitants who belonged to it. The events that occur around these things lead us into constant suspense. Overall, the setting really matters to the mystery because it gives it excitement, reason, and the suspense always needed in a good story.

Article posted November 12, 2011 at 07:36 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 39



Article posted November 14, 2011 at 01:24 AM GMT • comment • Reads 46

I feel that a train would be the perfect closed setting for a mystery. Noone can leave the train. There are many different suspects. The shape of the setting makes it difficult to watch everyone. There are many different hiding places, like other compartments. The high speed of the train adds to the adrenaline and excitement of the mystery. The scenery outside the train should be a dark, desolate area. The perfect closed setting would consist of these details.

Article posted November 14, 2011 at 01:24 AM GMT • comment • Reads 46



Article posted December 1, 2011 at 04:13 PM GMT • comment • Reads 35

the perfect mystery setting has to be scary. like killing and suspects. if there wasnt killing or scary then it would not be a fun mystery story. hounds of the baskervills was a good mystery story because it had killing.

Article posted December 1, 2011 at 04:13 PM GMT • comment • Reads 35



Article posted November 14, 2011 at 10:52 PM GMT • comment • Reads 46

I think the best closed setting is a cruise ship in the middle of the ocean.  I think this because nobody can get on or off easiliy.  I think this is good because it would be a closed and it would have to be a person on the ship at the time of the murder or theft.  This is the setting that i would choose if I wrote a mystery novel.

Article posted November 14, 2011 at 10:52 PM GMT • comment • Reads 46



Article posted November 15, 2011 at 02:27 AM GMT • comment • Reads 36

I think a good mysterious setting would be a dark alley because it is eerie, suspicious, dark, and scary.. Many people are scared of the dark....

Article posted November 15, 2011 at 02:27 AM GMT • comment • Reads 36



Article posted November 17, 2011 at 11:00 PM GMT • comment • Reads 42

I think that a great mystery setting would be in a place sorta of deserted where barely anybody lives.I think this would be a great setting because really nobody lives there and everybody would know everybody. So if someone went missing then people would realize instead of not noticing.

Article posted November 17, 2011 at 11:00 PM GMT • comment • Reads 42



Article posted November 16, 2011 at 12:45 AM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 40

The perfect mystery setting in my opinion would be very dark and eerie. The roads would be made from stone and the buildings would be very old-fashioned. It would take place in a little village in the Black Forest in Germany. It would be very wooded and beautiful with a creepy touch. This is what I think would be the perfect mystery setting.

Article posted November 16, 2011 at 12:45 AM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 40



Article posted November 15, 2011 at 04:11 PM GMT • comment • Reads 36

Mysteries had many differnet endings and settings. For Scooby-Doo Mysteries for example. Three basic steps; Trap, indentify, and conclusion. But, we aren't talking about Scooby-Doo. If I can think of a perfect "closed setting", I would say, in a abounded warhouse chasing the victim. I think so because, a mystery group would investigate anywhere when they find any clues, from a question, or where the mystery starts. Also, you never know where they hang out, unless you find clues. If this was a ending setting in a mystery story and I was in it, this would a challenge or race for the end.

Article posted November 15, 2011 at 04:11 PM GMT • comment • Reads 36



Article posted November 14, 2011 at 02:48 AM GMT • comment • Reads 39

I think the perfect setting for a mystery would be one of the churches that was turned into a bar in Aberdeen, Scotland. I can imagine when the bar is closed and the bar tender is the only person there and its completely silent. The wooden floors would make creaking noises the wind whistle. Also the moonlight would shine in the window and make scary reflections on the mirror behind the bar.

Article posted November 14, 2011 at 02:48 AM GMT • comment • Reads 39



Article posted January 17, 2012 at 05:29 PM GMT • comment • Reads 42

I think that a perfect mystery setting would be a dark night with thick fog. As you walk, you can feel the silence of your lonesome footsteps. You hear a howl in the distance. The fog begins to set and you cannot see but a foot in front of you. As you increase the speed of your steps, you feel someone, something watching you. The sound of the gravel crunching under you is all you can hear as you walk through the darkness. (Scene)

I think that this makes a perfect mysterious setting right before something bad happens.

Article posted January 17, 2012 at 05:29 PM GMT • comment • Reads 42



Article posted November 17, 2011 at 01:03 AM GMT • comment • Reads 42

Nothing too see, no one to find. It's pitch black and I'm crying for help on an isolated cliff with only mistress death to accompany me.

I would think the best setting would be somewhere very isolated and quite eerie. There would have to be many mysterious, shadowy characters to accompany the idea of the place. Many twisted trees and dark, creepy creatures hunting in the night. A murder would have to take place given the nature of the setting. So the best mystery story would have to take place somewhere creepy or dark.

Article posted November 17, 2011 at 01:03 AM GMT • comment • Reads 42



Article posted November 12, 2011 at 03:59 AM GMT • comment • Reads 37

In my opinion the perfect setting would be in a jungle. There you could meet animals. Also the accused could find very interesting places to hid things and his/her self! This woould have very good supense and mystery.

Article posted November 12, 2011 at 03:59 AM GMT • comment • Reads 37



Article posted November 10, 2011 at 11:43 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 35

I think an island is the perfect setting for a mystery story, especially a murder! It helps to make the story that much more exciting, because you know you can't escape the murderer on a little strip of land. An island also adds a nicer element to the story, in the sense that you dont have to narrow down suspects as much. You know right away, people who arent on the island, arent guilty. To me, being able to narrow down suspects makes the story that much more fun, because i can focus on the story line and the characters much more.

Article posted November 10, 2011 at 11:43 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 35



Article posted November 10, 2011 at 11:43 PM GMT • comment • Reads 39

I think an island is the perfect setting for a mystery story, especially a murder! It helps to make the story that much more exciting, because you know you can't escape the murderer on a little strip of land. An island also adds a nicer element to the story, in the sense that you dont have to narrow down suspects as much. You know right away, people who arent on the island, arent guilty. To me, being able to narrow down suspects makes the story that much more fun, because i can focus on the story line and the characters much more.

Article posted November 10, 2011 at 11:43 PM GMT • comment • Reads 39



Article posted November 15, 2011 at 09:34 PM GMT • comment • Reads 37

A nice novel needs flowers, sunlight, and happiness, but a mystery story needs the exact opposite. First, the story has a setting that is gloomy, and sad. There is noone skipping down the street or singing. Everyone is scared about thier surroundings. In this story Sir Charles was just murdered, so everyone is a suspect and everyone is scared. It makes the mystery seem way more mystery. That is why a mistery story NEEDS that setting

Article posted November 15, 2011 at 09:34 PM GMT • comment • Reads 37



Article posted November 10, 2011 at 11:31 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 45

I think that the perfect "closed setting" for a mystery would be ina house near a lake. I chose this because this setting always gets me thinking of the many things that can happen near a lake and forest. A lot of mystery books use this setting making it common, but each with its own twist!

Article posted November 10, 2011 at 11:31 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 45



Article posted November 13, 2011 at 03:31 AM GMT • comment (3) • Reads 36

Some people might disagree, but I would say the best place to set a mystery is in a very Stephen King- like places. Obviuosly Stephen King always sets his stories in Maine but, the stories are also always in small, middle-of-nowhere, foggy, eerie towns. This would be the perfect place because it just has a creepy presence by its self, a mystery would only add to the suspense. The moor in "The Hound of the Baskervilles" has a similar description as my setting would. The only difference would be that mine wouldn't have abandoned Neanderthal homes in it.

Article posted November 13, 2011 at 03:31 AM GMT • comment (3) • Reads 36



Login
Copyright (c) 2014 by Conditions of Use    Privacy Policy Return to Blogmeister