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Article posted May 2, 2012 at 11:29 PM GMT • comment • Reads 35

How would Prometheus answer the question: "Do you think before you act?" I think he would answer: "yes." He did think before he acted. He thought about it all night while he lay on his couch. Zeus said man wasn't happy, but Prometheus saw a different side to the story. He knew that man needed fire to prosper and advance further in their civilizations. I think he knew that Zeus would punish him. Not specifically how, but just in general. He did what he did for the good of man, and they thrived into what we are now. He made a good choice when he gave man fire. Where would be be now without it?

Article posted May 2, 2012 at 11:29 PM GMT • comment • Reads 35



Article posted April 14, 2012 at 02:14 PM GMT • comment (2) • Reads 34

In my opinion, a good persuasive speech topic would have to be... to read books. I feel that not many people, particularly the male population in our age group, read a lot of books. All they're interested in are bloody video games and whatnot. Books are educational as well as fun. While reading, you are expanding your vocabulary, being exposed to new styles of writing, and just fixing up your writing skills in general. Books don't have to be boring poop, you know. If you have trouble, just ask anyone around you to recommend a good series for you. That's how I find new books to read. Just because you haven't found the right book doesn't mean it's not out there. You just have to keep looking. Finally, reading is exciting. It can take you on exciting adventures. If you delve deep enough into the book, you can actually feel what the character is feeling. Excitement, fear, depression, or just plain neutral. You can even see what the character sees by imagining it in your head. All in all, read. It's a very good idea.

Article posted April 14, 2012 at 02:14 PM GMT • comment (2) • Reads 34



Article posted April 5, 2012 at 03:17 PM GMT • comment • Reads 34

Lately, our government has been a bunch of poop. They just keep on spending more and more and more money until we end up having to owe every country on the globe. The government needs to set their priorities straight. One thing the government should really prioritze is the education of the younger generation. If we are educated, then we can get a job and live a decent life. Yet, kids are dropping out of high school or they don't graduate with a degree. The government needs to do something to bring the percentage of highschool dropouts and kids without a college degree down. Second, the government should also focus on healthcare. People can't pay their medical bills or even their perscriptions! Why? Because healthcare is too expernsive for the average Americain. They need to lower the price or even make healthcare free, like it is in Canada. Finally, the government also needs to focus on creating more jobs. Lately, more and more people have been losing jobs due to the falling economy. If the government can create more jobs, people can get back and track and help to support their families with the pay they will receive. In conclusion, the government had better get started before it's really too late.

Article posted April 5, 2012 at 03:17 PM GMT • comment • Reads 34



Article posted April 4, 2012 at 02:37 PM GMT • comment • Reads 33

Two articles that we have recently read in Language Arts class argue if professional athletes get paid too much. One article said yes, the other one said no. I agree that professional athletes get paid too much. First off, what are they actually doing to help our community? Sure, entertainment is important to make sure we don't bore ourselves to death, but it isn't saving lives. People who are looking for a cure for cancer are saving lives, and they probably get paid half as much as a professional athlete. It should be the other way around. Also, what skills are truly required to be a professional athlete? You have to be good at the sport, but that's about it. Maybe some common and logail sense thrown in there as well. Being an athlete is wasting all those years spent in school. People who quit college to join a professional sport team don't end up making it. They don't have a degree, so they can't get a job. They are broke, with no degree, and they have to work a minimum wage job. Finally, it's the athletes attitudes. They complain they don't get enough money and they demand more when the league isn't doing so well. "Kenny Anderson, then a guard for the Boston Celtics, complained of not being able to afford the insurance on his eight cars." That's what Justin Hjelm wrote in his article, "Do Professional Athletes Get Paid Too Much?" Who needs eight cars, first off. Being a professional athletes makes you a whinny, little, spoiled brat.

Article posted April 4, 2012 at 02:37 PM GMT • comment • Reads 33



Article posted March 20, 2012 at 04:20 PM GMT • comment • Reads 37

c) What were the causes of World War I? How are those similar or different from the causes of The Battle of the Five Armies? Did the real war or the imaginary one end up better? How so?



The causes of World War 1 was the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria-Hungary in Sarajevo. The assassin was a part of a terrorist group in Serbia, so Austria-Hungary thought the Serbian government was behind the assassination. Austria-Hungary declared a war on Serbia and to settle bad blood between them.



The Battle of the Five Armies was caused by the dispute of the gold in The Lonely Mountain. Of course, it's different from the cause of World War 1. They weren't fighting about gold in a mountain, but it started with an argument like it did in The Hobbit. It's similar, but not exactly the same.



In my opinion, I feel that the imaginary war turned out than the real war. First off, this war only lasted for one day. How long did World War 1 go on for? Four years. Also, the imaginary world ended up like all fairy tales do; with a happily ever after ending. We still had a second World War after the first one, unlike The Hobbit.

Article posted March 20, 2012 at 04:20 PM GMT • comment • Reads 37



Article posted January 31, 2012 at 01:06 AM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 35

In Language Arts, we read a poem called "There's A Hole In My Sidewalk." We have to find out what some of the holes in our sidewalk would be. For me, I have three small holes. My first hole would be my anger. ( Trust me. You have NOT seen me angry. Yet. ) I have a short, quick temper that usually gets me in a lot of trouble, especially with my parents. My second hole would be my laziness. I'm definitely not sporty, and I always demand things from other people, when I don't feel like getting it myself, and that usually portrays me as rude. ( If there was an award for laziness, I would be in first place. ) My third and final hole would be my stubbornness. I usually make quick, rash decisions that I usually end up regretting making in the end. In conclusion, from now on, I will try to avoid these holes in my sidewalk.

Article posted January 31, 2012 at 01:06 AM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 35



Article posted January 17, 2012 at 05:33 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 33

Many says, I want change

Want change in my time

Want change in my life

I want a change badly

I want change, many say



They pray for a change

They wish for a change

They look for a change

But they will not change

They just wait for change



It never happens to them

It will never ever happen

By mere prayer or wish

It must start from inside

With tons of determination



Change is not so easy

It takes lots of time

So it needs determination

The will to make change

The will to see change



Then only things will change

Then only time will change

Then only life will change

So go and get change

To see the bliss of change



- Kranthi Pothineni



This poem reminds me of Mahatma Gahndi and Martin Luther King Jr. They wanted change, but they didn't wait around like most people. Instead, they actually took charge, and made the change happen. I'm not like them. I wait for change. I guess I'm not sure how to be the change I want to see in the world. I don't really take initiative in my life. I'm more of a follower, but I will take charge when no one else will. There are still many things that need to be changed in the world, such as government in some countries, living conditions, and many other things. There are people like Mahatma and Mr. King in this world, that are actually taking a stand to these problems, and be the change they want to see in their world.

Article posted January 17, 2012 at 05:33 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 33



Article posted December 6, 2011 at 01:02 AM GMT • comment • Reads 34

What matters in my life? Now, that is definitely a tough question. are definitely one thing; I’d probably go crazy without them. But, the number one thing I couldn’t live without is my family. Without people to care about me, I’d be all alone, scared and frightened. I mean, I’m only twelve, not eighteen; still young enough to depend on other people, right? If nobody around me loved or cared about me, I’d feel really alone, exposed, and definitely vulnerable to the dangers in the world. My family is close to my heart, and I couldn’t survive without them.

Article posted December 6, 2011 at 01:02 AM GMT • comment • Reads 34



Article posted November 8, 2011 at 10:29 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 35

The perfect "closed setting" for a mystery story would definitely be something dark and something gloomy. It shouldn't be all rainbows and unicorns, or else the reader won't be interested or eager to find out more. Take The Hound of the Baskervilles, for an example. The setting right now is pretty creepy, the Baskerville Hall all big and scary, with no one else around. And, the fact that when we ended, Watson heard a woman crying, when trying to fall asleep in his bedroom. Without the dark setting, the mystery just wouldn't be as exciting or as thrilling as it should be. Setting, in my opinion, is the key to a great mystery novel.

Article posted November 8, 2011 at 10:29 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 35



Article posted October 22, 2011 at 03:19 PM GMT • comment (3) • Reads 35

Everybody experiences fear, so it's not a new emotion to me. Fear definitely controls us, and even makes us do things that, under normal circumstances, we would probably never do. It's almost like an adrenaline rush, really. Like the mother and the car thing; if her baby is stuck underneath a car, the mother will get the adrenaline rush from the fear, and would be able to lift the car up, and rescue the baby from underneath. It literally makes us do crazy things, since the blood from the front of our brain, which is where we make our logical choices, rushes to the back, where the control of lungs, heart, and stuff like that is. I would say fear motivates you, but I don't really love the motivation if gives me. I can't truly remember any experience where fear has surprised me in some way, but I'll definitely keep my eyes open. All in all, I would say fear affects us in, mostly, negative ways, such as in "The Monster of Maple Street." Yet, it makes us do crazy things, that we would never imagine that we could do alone possible.

Article posted October 22, 2011 at 03:19 PM GMT • comment (3) • Reads 35



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