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Article posted March 27, 2012 at 04:08 PM GMT • comment • Reads 229

Do you know how the racers and the dogs were protected, when they did the Jr. Iditarod? Well keep reading on to find out more!



Racers must have 2 lbs. of food per dog in case of an emergency, so the dogs can eat and not be starving. They need food because they're going to be out there for weeks. The day before the race the dogs eat 4 lbs. to get ready for the race.



The checkpoint is when they check the racers and the dogs. Then if the racers haven’t come through the checkpoints then the people look for the racers, then there’s the half way point where racers have to stay for 10 hours. So they can feed the dogs and make the fire with the wood. Then in the morning they start going again.



After the whole Jr. Iditarod race they check the dogs feet to make sure they're safe. When they check the dogs they see if the dogs have cracks on their feet. If the dogs have cracks on their feet then they put booties on them.



Now you will remember what I told you about the Jr. Iditarod. So thank you for reading!





Article posted March 27, 2012 at 04:08 PM GMT • comment • Reads 229



Article posted April 16, 2012 at 07:06 PM GMT • comment • Reads 84

I am going to talk about the Iditarod Dream. Well I will start with the boy. His name was Dusty. Dusty is running a race with his dogs. He had to make a trip to the south to deliver some medicine. He had done the same thing last year and he remembers the temperature thirty-below-zero and how his glasses were coated with ice and how he couldn’t see the trail not one bit. But instead of getting 1st he still got a good place 4th. He replaced his glasses with contact lenses and his team was better than ever. If he couldn’t see the track anymore he wishes that his dogs would lead him the way.



The day before the race they gathered in a little area and they called it a pre-race meeting. During the pre-race meeting they were choosing there positions and he picked the position number (#) 6 a good position he had did the same number last year as well. He sees familiar faces from last year like Andy Willis the favorite to win this year and Dusty was determined. Noah Burmeister who had come all the way from Nome. Dusty went with his father for his final nights sleep before the race



The next morning was the day of the race he and his father arrived early 2 hours earlier and it is zero degrees which is perfect for the dogs, and if it gets any warmer then the dogs would over heat. The race begins on frozen Lake Lucille and 79 miles north through the forests, over windswept swamps, and up the ice covered Yentna River to a cabin called Yentna Station, the halfway point.



Dusty is in the lead and he sees no one in sight. At the end he wins the race and how delighted he is! Every one thinks he is hurting his dogs but that is a lie, even ask their parents if you don’t believe me. He respects his dogs just the way he respects his friends and family and treats every one and every thing equally.

Article posted April 16, 2012 at 07:06 PM GMT • comment • Reads 84



Article posted March 29, 2012 at 04:15 PM GMT • comment • Reads 44

I am going to be talking about the story Iditarod Dream and how the Jr. Iditarod protects the racers and the dogs. Dusty is a boy that is in the Jr. Iditarod contest which is dog slaying. He lives in Alaska Anchorage. The day of the race he got at the race 2 hours before it was zero degrees which is very good for the dog he said. The race began at Frozen Lake Lucille and it runs seventy-nine miles and it ends at Nome Alaska. Last year they started 10 miles farther and Dusty got worried because the lake ice is barely covered and he could lose control. He was getting ready and he has to carry 2 pounds of food for each dog. It was 10 minutes before the race started; dusty was at the starting line he got all the dogs hook up. The race starts they cross safely across the lake. They were at road and they got out of control and he had to slow the team down. In that part of the story he was he did not want the dogs to get hurt on the ice so he slowed them down. They take there first break he gives the dogs there snakes so that it will keep there energy up. He checks there feet for any injuries and OT and Blacky had splits in the weds between so he put booties on them so that it would protect there their feet. He stops at night melts some snow and lets the dog rest and feed them and get every thing ready for when they get start again. Then he at least get to sleep for 15 minutes, and than they are back on the snow. That is how the Jr. Iditarod protects the racers and the dog teams.

Article posted March 29, 2012 at 04:15 PM GMT • comment • Reads 44



Article posted April 25, 2012 at 06:35 PM GMT • comment • Reads 54

Do you know what the Jr. Iditarod is? In my blog I’m going to write about the Iditarod Dream and how the racers protect their dogs. Iditarod helps protect the racers and the dogs. The Jr. Iditarod is when different people go to Nome, Alaska carrying medicine for the people in Nome that are really sick and they can only survive with medicine. It is just like a relay race but they aren’t using the metal things, they use the medicine. They hand them off to each other using their sleds and their dogs. They mush and mush until they reach the person that they’re supposed to give it to them.



The mushers have to carry 32 pounds of dog food, 2 pounds per dog. Also each musher has 16 sled dogs! Once they reach each checkpoint, they can feed their dogs, if they want to. When they reach the half way point, they feed their dogs again, and they have to wait ten hours. After their ten hours are up, they get to leave and continuing mushing.



Also when they reach the half way point, the mushes must check the dog’s paws to see if the dogs have little scratches, and if their paws are really cold. If the have the scratches they put little booties on their paws. The booties help the dog’s paws get warmer and they help them make the trip easier and faster.



Thanks for reading my essay on my blog!

Article posted April 25, 2012 at 06:35 PM GMT • comment • Reads 54



Article posted March 30, 2012 at 04:49 PM GMT • comment • Reads 71

Iditarod Dream



I’m going to tell you about Iditarod Jr. He was the one that enter the race and he got first place.



He was getting ready for a race to bring medicine to the sick people so that is why he enters the race because last time he enters a different race and he got last place. So he enters this race so he could get first place.



He is going to race at Alaska, Nome which is thirty below 0 degrees and it was freezing cold at Nome and they have to get in there positions to get ready for them to race and the race was eleven days long and the dogs had to run 24 hours every day and the race was very long for the dogs every night dusty had to check dogs paws and if there were scratches on there paws.



Dusty puts booties on them so it won’t hurt there feet so much and they go back to the race and at night time Dusty puts headlight on and it runs on batteries so the dogs could see at night time cause if he didn’t have that how would the dogs see at night cause it will be hard for them to see in the dark.



I hope you like my essay about the Iditarod Dream it was a really good story so I hope you learned a lot for this about the Iditarod dream race thank you.









Article posted March 30, 2012 at 04:49 PM GMT • comment • Reads 71



Article posted March 30, 2012 at 04:38 PM GMT • comment • Reads 54

I’m going to tell you about how the Jr. Iditarod protects the dogs and how they take care of the dog. If sounds interesting pleas read on. Oh one thing before I start the Jr. Iditarod is a race.



First of all they feed them and walk them and give them food. Such as when they are racing they feed them and give them water every mile to get them energy. They walk them for miles for every day to get them ready for the race. So that is how they nurture them.



Second of all they make sure there in great condition. For an example if they are sick they take them to the vet. Or if they have splits on there feet they put booties on the feet that are split. They also always make sure that they have enough love to keep them healthy. That is another way they take care of there dogs.



The third way they care for the dogs is entertainment. The have to keep the dogs actively entertained. That will keep the dogs from getting fat. So I think that they play fetch and other physical activities. Then they walk them and train them so they get ready to run the miles they have to run on the race. That is the third way the care for the dogs.



Those are the ways they care and take care of their dog. That’s all. So I hoped you enjoyed. Oh I forgot. The names of some dogs are Annie, QT, Jazz, Bettie, and Blacky. So now that all. Hoped you enjoyed.

Article posted March 30, 2012 at 04:38 PM GMT • comment • Reads 54



Article posted May 3, 2012 at 03:46 PM GMT • comment • Reads 42

In this passage I’m going to tell you about what 3 kids from Hot and Cold Summer might do for the rest of the summer. So if you are interested please read on. In the story theirs a girl named Bolivia. There are also 2 boys named Rory and Derek they were brothers and best friends. The three of them were friends too. So if this sounds interesting to you please read on.

So the rest of the summer was hot as usual. So they wanted to go to the pool. But Bolivia didn’t have a pool pass. So they were thinking of a way to get her in without getting caught. So they listed some ideas and voted witch one might be the best. Unfortunately they all voted for their own.

So they decided to try all three. The first one was Rory’s. So they helped Bolivia jump the fence. But they got caught. Then they tried Bolivia’s idea. So they slipped the pool cards under the fence. But the life guard knew that she wasn’t Rory. So they tried Derek’s idea. So they put Bolivia in a huge suitcase. And took the suit case to the pool. And it worked! So they used that trick for the rest of the summer.

That was the most amazing part of the summer. Sneaking her into the pool with them. But it didn’t last long before she moved back home. A least they had the time if their lives that summer. To bad it didn’t last forever.

So that is what I think the rest of the summer was like for the three friends (Rory, Bolivia, and Derik.) Hope you enjoyed. Don’t forget to check back on this page and see all the new posted links.







Article posted May 3, 2012 at 03:46 PM GMT • comment • Reads 42



Article posted March 26, 2012 at 03:36 PM GMT • comment • Reads 57

Do you know about the Jr. Iditarod? If you don’t then keep reading and you will know all about it. I will tell you about how the racers and dogs are protected, how much food they need and much, much more!!



Do you ever think about how much food the dogs need in their long journey through the Jr. Iditarod? It is 2 lbs. per dog. You would think that would be a lot of food, but it really isn’t that much food. They get tired, and when they are tired they get hungry. They only carry 2 pounds of food per dog so that no racer has more food and no racer has less food.



Racers also have checkpoints. These checkpoints are created to protect racers and their dogs. You are probably wondering why they have checkpoints and how they are useful, and how they protect. They have a list with the racer's name and how many dogs they have. If they get there and they don’t have the same amount of dogs they are supposed to have or if they don’t come at all then they probably should send out a search pod or something else. At the checkpoints they check the dog’s paws and if the dogs have cracks in their paws they will give the dogs little booties. Those little booties will help the dogs through their long journey and make it much easier.



There is also a halfway checkpoint for the racers and dogs. They have to stay at that checkpoint for at least 10 hours. During the 10 hours the racers prepare. They feed their dogs and they rest. When the racers rest they have to sleep with their dogs on the ground. It might not sound comfortable but at least they get to sleep. Usually at night the racers build a fire that helps them keep them and their dogs warm.



That is all about what I know about the Jr. Iditarod. I told you about the checkpoints, the halfway checkpoint, and the food for the dogs. I hope you enjoyed this essay about the long journey of the Jr. Iditarod. Thank you!

Article posted March 26, 2012 at 03:36 PM GMT • comment • Reads 57



Article posted March 27, 2012 at 03:54 PM GMT • comment • Reads 42

Do you know about the Jr. Iditarod? I do, and I’m also going to talk about it. I hope you read on and enjoy my essay. Thank you!



I’m going to talk about why racers must have two pounds of food per dog. Racers must have two pounds of food per dog because everybody can have the same amount of food and it doesn’t have to be unfair. It’s also about weight, making sure all the weight is even.



There is a checkpoint. A checkpoint is for making sure the dogs and racers check into, so the dogs and racers can start the race. The dogs and racers also go to the checkpoint to see if all the dogs and racers are okay and that there aren’t any injuries.



The ice and snow is so cold for the dog’s feet, racers check their feet to make sure all of the dog’s feet are okay. The racers check the dogs because the racers want to make sure all of the dog’s feet don’t have any cracks in their feet.



Do you know how many miles the dogs run before they get to the half-point? I know… the racers race 79 miles to the half-point, then wait 10 hours at the half-point and then they race 79 miles back to the finish line! The racers wait 10 hours at the half-point because the racers want to check if the dogs don’t have splits in their feet, they eat, and they have to get a little bit of rest!



I hope you learned about the Jr. Iditarod, and how racers and dogs stay safe. I also learned a couple facts about the Jr. Iditarod, and I hope you learned from me. Thank you for reading by essay about the Jr. Iditarod!





Article posted March 27, 2012 at 03:54 PM GMT • comment • Reads 42



Article posted March 29, 2012 at 04:06 PM GMT • comment • Reads 50

I will be teaching you about the Jr. Iditarod. I learned that the Iditarod is for adults and the Jr. Iditarod is for the younger people. The Jr. Iditarod takes place in Alaska. In 1925 the people of Nome needed help so the people from Anchorage out with the with sled-dog teams on the Iditarod trail to deliver life-saving medicine.

In this blog it describes the experiences of Dusty Whittemore as he completes the Jr. Iditarod. He sees familiar faces from last year – Andy Willis and Noah Burmeister. They have to pick a number from a hat and Dusty picked number 6. Dusty has to pack food for the dogs and there are about 10 dogs and each has to have a 2 pound food. Dusty has to carry 20 pounds of food in his sled.

The checkpoint is for the racers and dogs. That is when Dusty looks at the dog’s feet for crack. If the dogs have cracks in there feet he will put on the booties.

The trail is only a few feet in the woods, and coming around a blind corner the dogs run smack into two snowmobiles in the path. The snowmobiles made a knot less than 5 minutes into the race. A tangle is musher’s second worst-nightmare. A moose is a musher’s 1st worst-nightmare because to a moose a dog looks like wolves and the moose might attack before the musher a can scare it off.

Thank you for reading about the Jr. Iditarod and I hoped you learned a lot.

Article posted March 29, 2012 at 04:06 PM GMT • comment • Reads 50



Article posted March 30, 2012 at 04:47 AM GMT • comment • Reads 44

The Iditarod cares a lot about the racers and dogs safety! In this essay I am going to tell you how they keep them safe. I hope you learn a lot from this essay!



One way they keep the racers safe is the checkpoints! The racers run for a long time, so in order for the dogs to be refreshed and hydrated they have these. Another reason they have these checkpoints is so if the racers don’t get there in a long time they know to go looking for them! That is one way they are safe!



The dogs have to run a lot during the race! They need a brake sometimes and that is why they need to stop at the check points for ten hours so the dogs can rest for a while. The people have to check the dog’s feet for cracks, which is why they put little booties on so there feet won’t hurt. This also gives them time to feed the dog’s food and water! That was another example!



It takes a long time to finish the Iditarod. So to keep the dogs fed each racer is required to carry 2 lbs per dogs of meat for the dogs. Before the race they are supposed to eat 4 lbs so they are ready to race!



There are a lot of ways the Iditarod keeps the racers safe! I hope you liked my essay. I think its good that they keep the racers safe!

Article posted March 30, 2012 at 04:47 AM GMT • comment • Reads 44



Article posted March 26, 2012 at 04:21 PM GMT • comment • Reads 52

Do you know how Jr. Iditarod protects their dogs when they are racing? Well, if you don’t know how they do it you should really read this.

One way Jr. Iditarod keeps the dogs and racers safe is they have check points. At each check point there are people that check the dogs and racers and make sure they are ok. If someone has not been to the next check point they send out people to try to go find them. At the half way check point the racers and their dogs rest for ten hours so they can prepare and get more energy. That is one way how they keep them safe.

Another way Jr. Iditarod keeps the dogs ok is they bring the food to the racers. If they did not do this maybe the racers would go a lot slower and it would take longer and more energy to race. The time they give the food to the dog and racers is at the half way point. That was another way they keep the dogs and racers safe.

The last way Jr. Iditarod keeps the racers and dogs safe is they give the dogs booties. Booties are things that you put on dogs feet. The reason they put them on the dogs feet is when the dog’s feet are cracked when they are racing. That is the last way Jr. Iditarod keeps the dogs safe.

Well, I hope you learned a lot on how Jr. Iditarod keeps the dogs and racers safe when they are racing. Thanks for reading this!



Article posted March 26, 2012 at 04:21 PM GMT • comment • Reads 52



Article posted March 23, 2012 at 08:33 PM GMT • comment • Reads 38

Do you know how the racers and dogs are safe in the Jr. Iditarod? Well if you don’t than I am going to tell you. If you read on you will learn a lot about the Jr. Iditarod enjoy!

Did you know that every single racer carry’s 2lbs of hamburger meat per dog? So he would carry 20 lbs. of hamburger meat and dry food. You won’t see a racer carrying a gallon of water. The way they get water is by melting snow.

Another way they keep the racers safe is using checkpoints. You’re probably thinking how are checkpoints safe. Well I have a good reason if a racer is lost the people at the checkpoint say, “he should be here by now”. Then they go and look for him.

Also at the checkpoints the racers check there dogs for web cracks and splits. If they do find any web cracks they put on booties to protect there feet while they run. If the find any splits in their feet they put on ointment.

When the racers get to the half way point they are required to stay at the half way point 10 hours. At the half way point the can feed the dogs check there feet for web cracks and splits there is a log cabin were visitors can stay but not the racers they are also required to stay with the dogs and sleep with them they lay down hay to keep warmth.

So have you learned how the racers and dogs are protected? If you have than good now you might want to watch an Iditarod race. To see if they do it the way I told you. I hope you enjoyed my essay!

Article posted March 23, 2012 at 08:33 PM GMT • comment • Reads 38



Article posted March 23, 2012 at 08:34 PM GMT • comment • Reads 47

Hey, do you know how they keep the racers and their dogs protected? Well if you keep reading on you will find out some cool facts and how the racers and their dogs are protected in the Jr. Iditarod dog sledding race

Do you know what the Jr. Iditarod is? Well I’ll tell you. We are honoring those who brought the medicine through really bad weather in Nome, Alaska. People were dying in this town and the only way they can survive is with the medicine, but they were so far away. The fastest transportation is dog sledding. So they would keep on going as far as they could and give it to another person who would dog sled it to the town to save the people.

Now we are going to talk about how they keep the dogs safe. When they are sledding they have to carry 2lbs of food for each dog. There are ten dogs so they have to race with 20lbs of food. Also they have to keep them in shape and healthy. They feed them eagle brand. They say it’s the best food, but it could be something else. When they are racing they have checkpoints and at the second checkpoint they let the dogs rest for ten hours. When the people get to each checkpoint they have to check the dog’s feet to see if they are okay. That’s pretty much how they protect them.

Finally we are going to talk about the mushers. Here are some reasons. The dogs protect you. They fight off dangerous animals and I heard that they sometimes will sacrifice themselves for humans. Also the dogs can keep the musher warm. At the Checkpoints they see if the dogs are okay and they check the racers of sickness or injury. Also they said you don’t have to finish the race and you might be too young. There are people that ride around in snowmobiles that check if you are alright. That’s pretty much it.

I hope you learned a lot about the Jr. Iditarod race, and about how they protect the mushers and dogs. Thanks for reading my essay.

Article posted March 23, 2012 at 08:34 PM GMT • comment • Reads 47



Article posted March 29, 2012 at 04:09 PM GMT • comment • Reads 43

How are Racers and dogs protected? Well keep on reading this and find out more about it.

First I am going to tell you about the check points for the racers and the dogs. When they pass the check point that have to stop and they also have to be check out and then they can keep on going with the race. The check point is also if they don’t feel good or stuff like that. The snow could give them a bad cold because in Alaska the degrees is 16 degrees and below.

The racers must carry 2 pounds of dog food for the dogs because the dogs are the racers that control the sled. The racers also have to bring food for them to. I think that the racers get a little bit more food them the dogs do, or maybe they get the same amount of food.

The 12 check point is when the racers stay there in a little cabin and they all have to stay there for 10 hours. The racers have to stay up because they have to make the dogs bed. The dog’s bed is made up of hay. The racer has to sleep in the ground in the cabin and the dogs also sleep in the cabin. In the morning they pack up all their stuff and then leave.

Before they racers and the dogs leave the racers have to check the dog’s feet to see if they have cracks in their feet or if there feet are cold or if there feet hurt. If there feet has that then they have to put on little booties on there feet.

Here are 3 facts about the Iditarod, 1. Did you know that the racers and the dogs have to travel 1 week in the cold weather. 2. The dogs could see into heavy snowstorms and the people can’t. 3. There are 16 dogs racing.

Now that you read this you learned about the Iditarod I hope you enjoyed it! Thank you!!

Article posted March 29, 2012 at 04:09 PM GMT • comment • Reads 43



Article posted March 30, 2012 at 03:51 PM GMT • comment • Reads 48

Do you know how the racers and dogs are safe in the Jr. Iditarod?? If you don’t then I am going to tell you. I hope you enjoy my essay!!

Did you know that every single racer carry’s 2lbs of hamburger meat per dog? So he would carry 20 lbs. of hamburger meat and dry food. You won’t see a racer carrying a gallon of water. The way they get water is by melting snow.

Another way they keep the racers safe is using checkpoints. You’re probably thinking how checkpoints are safe. Well I have a good reason if a racer is lost the people at the checkpoint say, “he should be here by now”. Then they go and look for him.

Also at the checkpoints the racers check there dogs for web cracks and splits. If they do find any web cracks they put on booties to protect their feet while they run. If the find any splits in their feet they put on ointment.

When the racers get to the half way point they are required to stay at the half way point 10 hours. At the half way point the can feed the dogs check there feet for web cracks and splits there is a log cabin where visitors can stay but not the racers they are also required to stay with the dogs and sleep with them they lay down hay to keep warmth.

So have you learned how the racers and dogs are protected? If you have, then good. Now you might want to watch an Iditarod race to see if they do it the way I had told you they did. Once again I hope you enjoyed reading my essay. Thank you!!

Article posted March 30, 2012 at 03:51 PM GMT • comment • Reads 48



Article posted March 26, 2012 at 03:34 PM GMT • comment • Reads 51

The Jr. Iditarod can be a difficult and dangerous race. It takes place in the winter so snow would fall making this race even harder. What if the racers and their dog teams get lost? What if they fall and get injured? What would happen? If it’s dangerous then how do people protect the young racers and dogs? What you’re reading right now has the answers.

The Jr. Iditarod is a long race. Their dogs would certainly get tired and hungry. Luckily, every racer (musher) has 2 ponds of food per dog. When a racer finishes the race they must be carrying the same amount of food in each dog’s bag. That way, they would know if they were giving each dog a fair amount. While racing, they are allowed to give the dogs snacks. It is important to feed the dogs so they can regain their energy.

The dogs been running and running. Again, the racers are allowed to feed the dogs snacks but even with snacks they will still be tired. How do the dogs keep running? The answer is a check point. When the dogs are racing they stop at check points. There, dogs can get meals. The racers have to check to make sure every dog in the team is all right. They also need to check the dog’s feet because after running their feet can be injured and some might have cuts. If their feet are injured, the dog needs to wear a bootie to protect it.

Now the dogs are ready to run again after stopping at the check point. They run some more. Over snow, past frozen lakes, and then come upon a wooden cabin. The wooden cabin is another check point. This check point is different, though. This one is called the ½ way point.

When they reach this point the dogs need to rest. The rule is that the racers have to stay at the check point for 10 hours. They also need to get to work. They need to cook food (for the dogs and the racer), boil ice to get water, check the dogs again, and make a warm fire.

Soon the night will fall and they need to sleep. The mushers need to keep the fire heated and to dogs warm. The racers have a choice of sleeping until their ten hours are up, or help the other racers.

After ten hours the racers can collect their dogs and finish the race. When they finish the race, the other people need to make sure the mushers were treating the dog’s right. To do this, they watch the dogs to see if they still have a lot of energy. If the dogs jump around and are willing to run then they would know that the musher was doing the right thing. If the dogs are tired and are weak then the racer has treated the dogs wrong.

Now you see, the Jr. Iditarod is concern about the racers and dogs and that they try to help them during races.



Article posted March 26, 2012 at 03:34 PM GMT • comment • Reads 51



Article posted March 30, 2012 at 03:59 PM GMT • comment • Reads 42

Hello my name is Desiree let me ask you a question did you know about something called the Iditarod dream? If not I’m going to tell you about it. Well the Iditarod takes place around Mount McKinley. Mount McKinley is very beautiful. Mount McKinley is located in Alaska. Read on for more information!



Well to start off you have to know how the racers and dogs are protected. The racers have to make sure the dogs are ok and safe. Before a racer can go to sleep he must check to see if a dog has cracks on his/her feet then he must help them. He can help him/her by putting botties on them. For example if one of the dogs gets cracks on his/her feet they put botties on them and it helps them run (like running shoes). Racers must have 2 lbs. of food per dog. If not, they won’t have enough food for the dog and then they won’t get to the finish line.



The racers need to dress warm or else they will get very cold. Also there are check points. The check points are to make sure that the racers are not taking short cuts or cheating. Another reason is to keep the racers safe. Racers must an eye on snowmobile because they don’t want to run in to them because they could get hurt.

Article posted March 30, 2012 at 03:59 PM GMT • comment • Reads 42



Article posted May 11, 2012 at 08:53 PM GMT • comment • Reads 44



Do you know about the racers and dogs at the Iditarod and the Jr. Iditarod? Well if you don’t know then read this essay!

Did you know that each racer has to carry 2 lbs. of dog food, for each dog? The rule is that they have to bring the same amount of food back with them. First I didn’t really get it, if they got hungry don’t they eat some of the food? Ms. Adams told me that the food was for emergencies only.

One of the cutest things I learn is that the racer checks the dog’s feet to see if they have cracks, if they do then they put ointment. Sometimes they even put booties on them when their paws are injured. The dogs look really small put it said in the book they are really powerful. Dusty a guy that did the Jr.Iditarod said that when he was pulling to get to the starting line he had to lift the dog front legs if he let the dog on both of their legs they would drag him. That’s how powerful they are.

All the racers have check points. It’s really helpful to the racers because they would know that their heading the right way. In the book it said that some people got lots when they were doing the Iditarod race. Another reason why checkpoints are helpful, is if racers are not at the checkpoint some people go out and find them if their lost, if they are stranded, or if their injured. That’s why it’s really important to have checkpoints.

Hope you enjoyed my essay and learned a lot about the adult Iditarod and the Jr. Iditarod.

Article posted May 11, 2012 at 08:53 PM GMT • comment • Reads 44



Article posted March 26, 2012 at 03:22 PM GMT • comment • Reads 38

The Jr. Iditarod’s Safety!

Have you ever heard of the Jr. Iditarod? Well if you have, then you will understand what this blog is all about. This blog will be about what the Jr. Iditarod does for the competitors and how they keep them safe.

First of all, the racers have checkpoints. You wonder how this protects the racers, don’t you? Well if a racer is not there after a certain amount of time something is wrong and they will go looking for him. For example, if somebody is gone for 1 hour and it takes 5 minutes to get to there, there is definitely something wrong.

There is also a half way checkpoint. This halfway checkpoint is very important. It helps people locate the racers. Racers are required to stay at this halfway checkpoint for at least 10 hours. Racers stay at this place to prepare. They get their food, equipment, and check their dogs. If the dog’s feet hurt they get special little booties for their feet. Racers help one another at this place.

Each dog gets 2 pounds of food. The racers have to bring their own dog food, though. I would say that they are well fed. They have to be full to race, right? Well, I would say that is pretty cool.



Well, that is it. I hope you have learned from this. I also hope that you have enjoyed this blog. Thank you for reading.

Article posted March 26, 2012 at 03:22 PM GMT • comment • Reads 38



Article posted March 23, 2012 at 08:34 PM GMT • comment • Reads 48

Hello, today you are going to be learning about how the Jr. Iditarod helps keep the teams safe. I hope you enjoy reading this great informative blog. I hope you learn a lot after reading this blog. Also before you read a musher is a sledder.

First off you might be wondering “What in the world is the Jr. Iditarod?” well the Jr. Iditarod is a dog sledding race in Alaska in honor of dog sledders who helped bring medicine to the isolated town of Nome, Alaska. These brave sledders had to sled with their strong dogs in the large area of Mt. McKinley. So in honor of these dogs and sledders two races are held every year; the Jr. Iditarod and the Iditarod. Now you are going to be learning how they help keep the mushers and the dogs safe in the Junior Iditarod.

To keep the mushers safe they created the Jr. Iditarod, because the Iditarod is over 1000 miles. That is crazy. The mushers in the Jr. Iditarod can be within the ages of 14 and 17. They must be healthy and drug free. They also must have snowshoes so they can walk in the snow without getting snow all over and then getting wet, they must have a headlight so they can stay safe in the dark, and they must also have matches or a lighter to start a fire to keep warm and to make a signal if they get lost.

Now let’s talk about how they keep the dogs safe. First off the mushers have to present a heath certificate and must be up to date on their vaccinations. They also have to get a urine or blood sample to check if the dog is getting some kind of illegal steroids so the dogs preform above their natural ability. To keep the dogs healthy and full of energy if a musher gets lost a musher must have at least 2lbs. of food per dog. The musher must also stop at the half-way checkpoint for up to 10 hours so the dogs can rest. A musher must also switch a dog out or drop him off at the next checkpoint because if the dog gets too tired it can become very serious. They must also check the dogs feet at each checkpoint and if there is a cut they must put a bootie on the dog to keep the cut safe.

I hope you enjoyed reading my blog. And I also hope you learned a lot. Thank you for reading my blog. Also please comment if you liked my blog.

Article posted March 23, 2012 at 08:34 PM GMT • comment • Reads 48



Article posted March 30, 2012 at 03:50 AM GMT • comment • Reads 49

Have you ever wondered how racers and dogs are protected in the Jr. Iditarod? Well, this is your chance to find out! Racers have to follow certain rules to keep themselves and their dogs safe. Read on to find out how racers and dogs are kept safe!



When dogs have wounded feet, their handlers will put “booties” on their feet to keep them safe until their feet heal. This helps the racers keep going and the dogs to run in comfort.



In the Jr. Iditarod, there are two very important checkpoints. The first checkpoint is where an official examines their sled, dogs, and cargo. The next one is Yentna Station, their halfway checkpoint and overnight stop. At this checkpoint, you are required to stay ten hours so you don’t get too far ahead. All the racers help each other build a fire so they can melt snow for water and warm up their food.



In the Jr. Iditarod, racers are required to carry certain cargo on their sleds. They are required to carry 2 lbs. of food per dog in case of emergency. (The food for the dogs’ dinner is delivered to the Yentna Station the day before.) The dogs also eat fish snacks to keep their energy up. Fish snacks are chunks of frozen salmon.



This is how racers keep themselves and their dogs safe during the Jr. Iditarod. I hope you were able to learn from this essay. Thank you for reading it.

Article posted March 30, 2012 at 03:50 AM GMT • comment • Reads 49



Article posted March 27, 2012 at 04:08 PM GMT • comment • Reads 47

Do you want to know how the Jr. Iditarod protects the racers and the dog teams? If you keep on reading, you will know how! I hope you like my essay and it teaches

you about how and what they do to protect and keep them safe and healthy.



First, what the racers need to do is check if they have all the required equipment for them and the dogs. The racers need to have 2lbs of food for the dogs at all times.



At the ½ way checkpoint, the racers have to feed their dog teams. Did you know that the racers have to wait 10 hours at a ½ checkpoint? That is a very long time!



After the dogs are done eating, the racer has to check the dogs feet for injuries. If they do have injuries, they put on shoes that are called ‘’Booties’’ to protect them from further damage. They can also switch them for another dog.



After you read my essay, I am sure you will understand how to be a good racer and take good care of your dog team with respect, kindness, and treat your dog team how you would like to be treated.

Article posted March 27, 2012 at 04:08 PM GMT • comment • Reads 47



Article posted March 23, 2012 at 08:36 PM GMT • comment • Reads 38

Do you know how dogs and racers are protected during the Iditarod race? Read my blog and you'll find out. I hope you enjoy it and learn about the Iditarod race.



I’m going to write about how much food the dogs must have during the race. Did you know that they give each dog 2 pounds of food? They carry 32 pounds of food in each sled. At the half way checkpoint the mushers feed their dogs. The mushers have to wait 10 hours after they feed the dogs until the mushers can continue the race.



The Iditarod makes sure the people are safe when they reach the checkpoints. Also, they make sure the dogs are safe. They also make sure they have enough food and supplies. Did you know That racers have to stay with their dogs at all times? There is a guest cabin at the half way point but only visitors can enter the cabin.



I am going to tell you how the racers must check the dog’s paws. At the checkpoints, the racers check the dog’s paws to see if they are injured. If the dogs have scratches on their paws the mushers must put booties on their dog’s paws. These booties help the dog’s paws and make the journey much easier for the dogs to run.



That is all I have to say about the Jr. Iditarod race. I wrote about the racers, dogs, checkpoints, and the dog’s paws. I hope you learned a lot from my essay!!







Article posted March 23, 2012 at 08:36 PM GMT • comment • Reads 38



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