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Welcome to my class blog. Students are exploring different foreign languages as well as specific historical time periods within Western Civilization.

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teacher: Julia Osteen

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Article posted February 16, 2012 at 07:50 PM GMT • comment • Reads 236

Rulers and Wars in England 1300's



 



In the 1300's England was constantly at war with Scotland. Scotland was fighting for their independence from England and there were two main wars, The Fisrt War of Scottish Independence, and The Second War of Scottish Independence. There were sevarel rulers of the time including Edward I, II, and III. There was also Richard III and Henry IV. England was very busy at the time and it was an interesting place to live. 



 







Article posted February 16, 2012 at 07:50 PM GMT • comment • Reads 236



Article posted February 3, 2012 at 03:00 PM GMT • comment • Reads 52



 Edward Longshanks ruled from 1272 to 1307.  He was born at Westminster in June 1239.  He married Eleanor of Castile.  He appointed a man named John Balliol to help rule over Scotland, but later, John Balliol rebelled against Edward in an attempt to gain all rule.  Edward defeated Balliol, but that did not stop the people of Scotland-  they hated Edward, and often rebelled against him because of his harsh punishments and evil ways of rule.  One day, Edward got very angry, and he ordered a cage to be built—once the cage was done, he locket the captured Countess of Buchan inside, as well as Robert the Bruce’s daughters- one of them was only 11/12 years old!  The daughters were held as ransom against Robert the Bruce.  Edward was, even after all this cruelty, still a strong ruler and was considered as one of the best and most successful monarchs of England.   Accomplishments in both war and law earned him the nickname ‘English Justinian.’  He was a both dangerous and clever man, and he continued to fight for more land.  He didn’t want to choose sides in the Baron war, but when his father was captured he gave his allegiance to Henry.



 



Article posted February 3, 2012 at 03:00 PM GMT • comment • Reads 52



Article posted February 2, 2012 at 10:29 PM GMT • comment • Reads 65

John Comyn was a man in Scotland in the 1300s who was rivals with Robert the Bruce. They both wanted to become the king of Scotland. Robert the Bruce wanted to get rid of his rival so he could then become the king. They wanted to both be loyal to Scotland so they didn't want to do anything bad. But one day in a church, Robert the Bruce snuck up on John Comyn and then fought until Robert the Bruce finally won when he killed John. Robert became the king, but he didn't tell anyone  so he loyalty would go away.

Article posted February 2, 2012 at 10:29 PM GMT • comment • Reads 65



Article posted February 2, 2012 at 03:48 PM GMT • comment (2) • Reads 50

It was built in the mid-13th century, in an age when the Scottish kings were battling to overcome the rioting province of Moray further north. Kildrummy guarded the main routes from the south as they converged, before being funneled northwards into Moray and Buchan.It was 30 miles west of Aberdeen. The castle was built in the 13th century to the design of St. Gilbert de Moravia.An enceinte castle, it consists of a semicircular courtyard enclosed by curtain walls set with five round mural towers. The largest was the Snow Tower. The Kildrummy castle belonged to Robert the Bruce.

Article posted February 2, 2012 at 03:48 PM GMT • comment (2) • Reads 50



Article posted February 19, 2012 at 02:13 PM GMT • comment • Reads 49

Battle of Bannockburn



The Battle of Bannockburn took place in Scotland. The King in Scotland was Robert the Bruce and the King in England was named King Edward the II. Scotland was looking to regain independence from England.



Did you know that the Battle of Bannockburn lasted from June 13-14, 1314? Although the bloody battle was going on England and Scotland made a deal not to destroy or fight near the Sterling Castle.



I bet you are wondering who won. If you guessed Scotland then you are correct. After only one day of brutal battle Scotland managed to win the war and regain their independence from England. After the war the King of Scotland, Robert the Bruce, name got changed to Robert the I.

Article posted February 19, 2012 at 02:13 PM GMT • comment • Reads 49



Article posted February 22, 2012 at 07:50 PM GMT • comment • Reads 55



Girl In A Cage



            I did my project on the Kildrummy Castle. Kildrummy Castle is set in Scotland, United Kingdom. Castles in these days and probably now if there are any left are for rich(er) people. Now, the Kildrummy Castle is in ruins. It was modeled on the latest French designs. Now, only the outside walls are standing and there are no complete rooms. In 1306, the castle was under siege for protecting Robert the Bruce, which was the king of England.



 



Citations:



                    http://www.historic-scotland.gov.uk/propertyresults/propertyoverview.htm?PropID=PL_169&PropName=Kildrummy%20Castle



                    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kildrummy_Castle



                    http://www.darkisle.com/k/kildrummy/kildrummy.html



http://www.undiscoveredscotland.co.uk/strathdon/kildrummycastle/index.html

Article posted February 22, 2012 at 07:50 PM GMT • comment • Reads 55



Article posted February 1, 2012 at 07:36 PM GMT • comment • Reads 50

Robert the Bruce was born on July 11, 1274 in Scotland. He was the oldest son of Marjorie and Robert, the Earl of Carrick. Robert the Bruce was the eighth male in his family that had the name Robert the Bruce. Robert the Bruce lead his country to victory against England who had taken over the rule of Scotland. Robert the Bruce is the reason why Scotland gained their independence. He died on June 7, 1329. He is thought of to be one of the greatest patriots of Scotland.



Citations



"Robert I, the Bruce." U*X*L Biographies. Detroit: U*X*L, 2003. Gale Student Resources In Context. Web. 1 Feb. 2012.



Ronald McNair Scott, R. (1989). Robert the bruce. (1 ed., p. 94,95). New York NY: Conogate.





"Robert I, the Bruce." U*X*L Biographies. Detroit: U*X*L, 2003. Gale Student Resources In Context. Web. 2 Feb. 2012.

Article posted February 1, 2012 at 07:36 PM GMT • comment • Reads 50



Article posted February 2, 2012 at 03:36 PM GMT • comment • Reads 46

My Summery on Battle of Methven



It all started when Robert the Bruce and Comyn were fighting many times throughout the years. They ended up in a church while they were fighting and Bruce stabbed Comyn till death. This is what triggered the battle. Bruce wasn’t afraid to go to war because Edward the first was weak. Now the battle of Methven was between King Edward and Bruce to see who would be the king of Scotland. Eventually England (King Edward) won. This gave England control over Scotland.



Sources:



. "The battle of Methven 1306." Scottish info . The editors for Gazeteers for Scotland, 2011. Web. Feb 1 2012. .



 



*Lewis, Alan. "The battle." Methven 700. Cairnwell Associates , 2006. Web. Jan 31 2012. <www.methvenonline.co.uk>.




Somerset Fry, Plantagenet and Fiona. Scots will be free . U.S.A: Barns and Noble books inc., 1995. 80-81. Print.




 

Article posted February 2, 2012 at 03:36 PM GMT • comment • Reads 46



Article posted February 2, 2012 at 03:40 PM GMT • comment • Reads 54



For regular meals, most people ate pottage, a thick broth made from vegetables and meat. Everyone ate bread. Feasts could include roasted swans, peacocks, and an assortment of sweet and spicy dishes.  Peasants worked hard everyday except for Sundays. They also had very poor diets. Most peasants didn’t live any longer than 25 years. If we were them, we would of lived almost half of our life already! Women wore linen undergarments called kirtles. They wore long-sleeved tunics over their kirtles, and over their tunics, they wore a coat with opened sides and no sleeves, called a surcoat. Men wore loose tunics, which were like dresses that came down to their knees. They also wore woolen stockings (long socks) or hose. People liked music. Music was simple in the medieval times. People played one note at a time on a bunch of instruments.



 



 



Elliot, Lynne. Clothing in the Middle Ages. 1. US: Crabtree Publishing Company, 2004. 32. Print.



 



Langley, Andrew. Medieval Life. 1. New York: DK Publishing Incorporated, 2004. 72. Print.



 



. "Music and Romances." Scotland's History. Crown Copyright, 2011. Web. 2/1/12. <http://www.ltscotland.org.uk/scotlandshistory/medievallife/musicandromances/index.asp>.

Article posted February 2, 2012 at 03:40 PM GMT • comment • Reads 54



Article posted February 24, 2012 at 02:32 PM GMT • comment • Reads 309

   My topic was feudalism. It developed in the middle ages. I also learned that it was very important in early Scotland years. It was a dominant social system in medieval Europe. This term wasn't used very much at all in America. Some people liked this term and some didn't. By the late 1300's this term wan't used anymore. You probably won't here feudalism in a normal sentence anymore. Have you?



*Brittanica School Addtion*

Article posted February 24, 2012 at 02:32 PM GMT • comment • Reads 309



Article posted February 3, 2012 at 02:06 PM GMT • comment • Reads 47

Edward I was the king of England from 1272 to 1307. He was nick named “Longshanks” because of his height and stature. He was also nicknamed “The English Justinian” because like the Roman Justinian he organized his laws. He was born on June 17, 1239 at Westminster Palace and died on July 7, 1307 at Burgh on Sands, Cumberland. He was crowned on November 6, 1272 and served as king until the day he died. He was married to Eleanor of Provence and had 16 children with her, but when she died he married Margaret of France and had 3 children with her have 19 total children. He conquered Scotland but later the Scots rebelled against him. He is currently most commonly known for restoring royal authority. When he died his son, Edward had many financial problems because of the many wars his father had started including the war with the Scottish people.



 



 



 



 



Cites:



 



Bunson, Matthew. Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages. 1st ed. 1. New York City: Facts on File, 1995. 157-158. Print.



 



 



"Edward, Kings of England." (2012): n.pag. Britannica School Edition. Web. 1/31/12.



 



 



"Edward 1, Longshanks." Britannia. N.p., 2011. Web. 2 Feb 2012.

Article posted February 3, 2012 at 02:06 PM GMT • comment • Reads 47



Article posted February 1, 2012 at 07:12 PM GMT • comment • Reads 81



King Edward Longshanks



 



            King Edward Longshanks was one of England’s greatest kings.  His real name was Edward the 1st but he was nicknamed Longshanks because he was so tall.  Right after King Edward came to the throne he conquered Wales and made his son the Prince of Wales.  As the king he made some new laws.  The new laws that he made had a long lasting influence on later kings of England.  In 1307 King Edward Longshanks tried to lead an army towards Scotland but he died before he reached the border.  King Edward I will forever be known as perhaps the greatest king in the history of England.



 



 



Citations



 



Database: "Edward, kings of England." 1st.1st (2012): n.pag. Britannica School Edition. Database. 27 Jan 2012. <[LINK] Edward&ct=null>.




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mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"">Book:
Bunson, Matthew. Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages. 1st. New York, NY, US: Facts in File Inc., 1995. 157-158. Print.




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mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"">Web:
. "Edward I 1272-1307 Early Years." English Monarch. English Monarchs, 2004-2005. Web. 27 Jan 2012. <[LINK]>.

Article posted February 1, 2012 at 07:12 PM GMT • comment • Reads 81



Article posted February 16, 2012 at 11:24 PM GMT • comment • Reads 39



John Comyn



   



 



      John Comyn was often called the Earl of Buchan. He was a member of Clan Comyn a group in the early 14th century. He was a chief opponent of Robert The Bruce a powerful Scottish leader. Robert and John were leaders in a 14th century civil war that both sides argued for independence. John Comyn had a cousin named John Comyn III who was killed by Bruce in Dumfries in 1306. John Comyn agreed to assist Bruce for the sake of the civil war between France and Scotland.



 



     From about 1300 to 1304 the civil war of Scotland was also the war or fight for power for the Comyns. John Comyn and a few of his cousins decided that they were going to fight the other side of their family for power and over parts of Scotland. John did not just want to fight his cousins he wanted to fight the Native people that lived there. His cousins set up armies around the boarder of Scotland. His cousins placed him in Galloway where his cousins and parts of France attacked Scotland. After a year of fighting John Comyn was sent to Paris to prevent a peace treaty to end the war. A few years later Comyn died (1308) as a sergeant for 14th century Scotland.



 



     John Comyn died from being murdered, since 1286 the threat of civil war between the houses of Bruce and Balliol had haunted and shaped Scottish politics. So Robert Bruce and his partners and associates killed Comyn and his Uncle because of their power in the civil war. This was a murder that had a huge turn in the Scottish civil war. Mostly because Comyn was one of the main leaders in then Scottish civil war and with his power over half of Scotland, Bruce was named leader of the civil war and now controlled the rest of the Comyn Clan. He brought torture on them and made them fight in the most dangerous battles then killed William Comyn. He killed William because he tried to runaway and form a Clan called the Comyn II but was found later on and was killed by Robert Bruce.



 



     With my research on John Comyn I concluded that he was a very tough man. He liked to fight and solve his problems with violence. I also concluded that his family was not a typical loving family. With them it was all about power and whoever had the most power was the best one in the family. So without any second guesses I think that there was constant family in the Comyn family.



 



 



 



 





























































































































Author or Editor Name(s)







































 





Editor(s)?



 


Author #1



Alexander



Stewart





 









Title of Web Page





John Comyn, Earl of Buchan





 





If citing only one page in a web site





Title of the Web Site





Wikipedia





 





Include subtitles & capitalize appropriately





Date Published or Last Revised





November 3,2001





 





dd mmm yyyy (as available)





Publishing Organization





Wikipedia





 





Name of publisher or sponsor





Date Retrieved





3 Feb 2012





 





Current date or date retreived





Web URL





[LINK]





 





Only if the resource would be difficult to find with a Web search





 





 







Article posted February 16, 2012 at 11:24 PM GMT • comment • Reads 39



Article posted February 3, 2012 at 02:40 PM GMT • comment • Reads 76








        So in Scotland there was on main war that lasted for years and years, which is the one I will focus on. In the early 1300’s King Edward I was the king of Scotland and started a war when he tried to take over Scotland and the Scottish fought back. Sir William Wallace and Robert the Bruce were 2 pretty major leaders for Scotland in this time.  Sir William Wallace was murdered by English soldiers. After he died, Robert the Bruce became more important. He became the king of a very important church of Scotland. King Edward I, descendant King Edward III, was still fighting years later. Eventually, in 1357 they signed a treaty stating that David II who had been taken captive by the English would be freed. However, the
mso-bidi-font-family:Helvetica">English demanded a ransom of 100,00 merks and the Scottish agreed.

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Article posted February 3, 2012 at 02:40 PM GMT • comment • Reads 76



Article posted February 4, 2012 at 03:01 AM GMT • comment • Reads 39

Women in the Middle Ages are different from women in this present age. Women had different roles in soceity than women do now. The role of women in society depended on what part of society you were in. There were two major groups of people the nobles and the peasants. The nobles and the peasants did many of the same things. Nobles would take care of their kids and also had a lot more respect than peaasants. Peasants took care of their children and their homes and sometimes even worked a job. If they worked a job they would be paid less than a man would be paid. Women in the Middle Ages faced different challenges than women in the present age do. One of the main challenges was men were dominate. Which means that they controlled what women did, how they did it, and when they did it. I learned a lot about women that I didn't know and I hope you did too.



 



Sources:






mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"">Chris, Trueman. "Medieval Women." History Learning Site. N.p., 2012. Web. 1 Feb 2012. <[LINK]>.






mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"">Alchin, Linda. "Middle Ages." Middle Ages Women. N.p., 26/9/06. Web. 2 Feb 2012. <[LINK]>.






mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"">Eastwood, Kay. Women and Girls in the Middle Ages. Canada: Crabtree Publishing Company, 2004. 4-11.








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Article posted February 4, 2012 at 03:01 AM GMT • comment • Reads 39



Article posted February 1, 2012 at 07:16 PM GMT • comment • Reads 52



The Battle of Methven



by Tony Wyche 



            The battle of Methven started when Robert Bruce killed John Comyn in a church in Dumfries. This took King Edward I by complete surprise, so he sent out an army of 3,000 to capture Bruce. He also sent out one of his best generals, Aymer de Valence. He was told to kill Bruce and show no mercy to him. Bruce barley escaped and ran away to the Scottish Highlands with a few others.



 



Citations:



Book:  Meek, James. The Land and People of Scotland. 1. USA: Harper Collins Publishers, 1990. 234.



 



Website:  "Battle of Methven." Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. 1. USA: 2007. Web. <[LINK]>.
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Website:   The Battle." Methven 700. 1. USA: 2006. Web. 1 Feb 2012. <[LINK]>.
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Article posted February 1, 2012 at 07:16 PM GMT • comment • Reads 52



Article posted February 2, 2012 at 03:36 PM GMT • comment • Reads 43



Robert the Bruce



 



 



Robert the Bruce was the king of Scotland from 1306 to 1329. To the Scots he’s known as a hero, because in 1314 he freed Scotland from the English rule.  He was born on July 11, 1274. In 1290 Robert’s grandfather was crowned king.
mso-bidi-font-weight:bold">The
English king Edward I, however, claimed authority over the Scots and awarded the crown to John de Balliol instead. Facing resistance from the Scots, Edward invaded and conquered Scotland in 1296. The army, who was forced to fight Robert, defeated him. He became an outlaw to the people. He was so determined that he decided to try again and defeat the English. When Edward I, was sent out to fight him he died in route. And his son Edward II, who was much weaker left he English troops to fend for themselves. By 1314 Robert had already driven from every town except for Stirling. Edward II finally decided to lead an army against them. Robert and his army defeated the English. For the next 14 years, there were still fights between them. Until, 1328 a peace treaty was signed to show Scotland’s independence. Robert died in 1329.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   



 



 



Article posted February 2, 2012 at 03:36 PM GMT • comment • Reads 43



Article posted February 3, 2012 at 02:30 AM GMT • comment • Reads 35



Robert the Bruce



 



 



Robert the Bruce was the king of Scotland from 1306 to 1329. To the Scots he’s known as a hero, because in 1314 he freed Scotland from the English rule.  He was born on July 11, 1274. In 1290 Robert’s grandfather was crowned king.
mso-bidi-font-weight:bold">The
English king Edward I, however, claimed authority over the Scots and awarded the crown to John de Balliol instead. Facing resistance from the Scots, Edward invaded and conquered Scotland in 1296. The army, who was forced to fight Robert, defeated him. He became an outlaw to the people. He was so determined that he decided to try again and defeat the English. When Edward I, was sent out to fight him he died in route. And his son Edward II, who was much weaker left he English troops to fend for themselves. By 1314 Robert had already driven from every town except for Stirling. Edward II finally decided to lead an army against them. Robert and his army defeated the English. For the next 14 years, there were still fights between them. Until, 1328 a peace treaty was signed to show Scotland’s independence. Robert died in 1329. Here are my sources.



 



Book Source: Sutherland, Dorothy. Enchantment of the World: Scotland. Canada: Regensteiner Publishing Enterprises. , 1985. 36-37. Print.



Internet Sources: "Robert I, the Bruce." U*X*L Biographies. Detroit: U*X*L, 2003. Gale Student Resources In Context. Web. 2 Feb. 2012.                     http://school.eb.com/comptons/article-9273371?query=RObert%20Bruce&ct=                 




"Bruce, Robert." Compton's by Britannica. Encyclopedia Britannica Online School Edition. Encyclopedia Britannica, Inc., 2012. Web. 2 Feb. 2012.<

http://school.eb.com/comptons/article-9273371

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     



Article posted February 3, 2012 at 02:30 AM GMT • comment • Reads 35



Article posted February 2, 2012 at 12:00 AM GMT • comment • Reads 44

My topic for my ‘Girl in a Cage’ research project was the Declaration of Arbroath. The Declaration of Arbroath is a treaty that the Scottish nobles and clergy wrote to the Pope John XXII of England that was supposedly written by Bernard of Kilwinning, Chancellor of Scotland, and Abbot of Arbroath. It was a statement of independence and freedom from Scotland, who was trying to become an emerging country. This declaration is also known as the Declaration of Independence (in Scotland). When it was being sent to the Pope John XXII, they sealed the letter with eight earls and thirty-one barons. This is the things that I learned about the Declaration of Arbroath.



Resources:



Meek, James. "The Land and People of Scotland." Declaration of Arbroath. 1st. New York City: HarperCollins Publishers, 1990. Print.



Unknown. "Wikipedia." Declaration of Arbroath. Unknown: Unknown, Web. 2 Feb 2012. <[LINK]>.



Unknown. "Scot Clans." Declaration of Arbroath. Web. 2 Feb 2012. <[LINK]>.

Article posted February 2, 2012 at 12:00 AM GMT • comment • Reads 44



Article posted February 2, 2012 at 04:02 PM GMT • comment • Reads 34

Scotland Wars and Rulers



 



I researched about Scotland wars and rulers. I learned that Robert the Bruce was the king of Scotland and he gained Scotland its independence. I also learned that he killed John Comyn. He killed John Comyn right before the Battle of Methven. The Battle of Methven was in between Scotland and England.  England won this battle. I also learned about the battle of Bannockburn. This was in between England and Scotland. Scotland won this battle in 1314 and they gained there independence,



Here are my sources. 



Wheeler, Dr. L Kip. "Timeline." http://web.cn.edu. N.p., January 12, 2012. Web. 2 Feb 2012. <http://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/timeline_1300.html>.



"Malcolm, kings of Scotland." Compton's by Britannica. Encyclopædia Britannica Online School Edition.



Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., 2012. Web. 2 Feb. 2012.



Suther, Dorathy. Enchantment of the World: Scotland. Canada: Regenstiener Publishing Enterprises , 1985. 116-119. Print.



 

Article posted February 2, 2012 at 04:02 PM GMT • comment • Reads 34



Article posted February 2, 2012 at 03:37 PM GMT • comment • Reads 48



 



Most warfare that was fought in England was long and costly sieges. Some of the weapons they used in war were swords and flails. They usually wore doublets and suits of armor. In the Campaign of Crécy in 1346, Edward the III and his army invaded Normandy with an army between twelve thousand and sixteen thousand. Over half of them were longbow men. Edward led his army on a chevauchée, which is a horse ride or plundering raid. The Black Prince, (Edward, prince of Wales) invaded France again after their victory and Crécy. They were facing a general so ugly,(Bertrand de Guesclin) he was called a hog in armor. But the British won again. The English also fought a war called the Hundred Years’ War. It was fought between Britain and France. The first important battle took place at sea, off the Flemish port of Sluys. On their ships, England carried 4000 men at arms and 12000 archers.        



 



Sources:



Chrisp, Peter. Warfare. Farmington Hills: Hodder Wayland, 2004. Print.



"Hundred Years' War." Encyclopædia Britannica. Encyclopædia Britannica Online School Edition.


Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., 2012. Web. 2 Feb. 2012.


<http://school.eb.com/eb/article-9041532>.



Nelson, Lynn. "The Hundred Years' War, 1336-1453." The Hundred Years' War, 1336-1453. N.p., n.d. Web. 2 Feb 2012. .
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Article posted February 2, 2012 at 03:37 PM GMT • comment • Reads 48



Article posted February 3, 2012 at 02:06 PM GMT • comment • Reads 96

Have you ever wondered what daily life was like in the Medieval Ages in Scotland?



Life was very different than what it is like today. Back then, women basically had barely any rights. Their main purpose was to have children. And back then, most marriages were arranged, and the husband had complete control over his wife. And what about the food? Back then, poorer people mostly ate bread, garden vegetables, and fresh meat. During the winter, they would eat the meat preserved in salt, although salt was very expensive. And guess what? They ate things like peacock and porpoise! They also had never heard of potatoes. You may ask, how was religion different back then? Well, religion was a very important part of daily life back then. A lot of men and women became monks and nuns. There were a few towns that were built off of churches. 



Have you ever wondered about the level of knowledge of medicine back then? First, in order to become a doctor or apothecary, you had to have studied for 10 years, much longer than now. Complicated battle surgery was performed on soldiers. And they believed that your blood had to be perfectly balanced, so they would remove some sometimes!



Have you ever thought about living in a castle? Life at the castle was the good life indeed. The king had loads of servants that would work in the kitchen, do household chores, and entertain the nobles with music and reading. Romance stories were read and acted as entertainment mostly to richer people back then. Music was played one note at a time on a variety of instruments. The castle was very colorful and alive.



And what about clothes? Have you ever thought about what kind of clothes they wore back then? The way it went then was: the simpler your clothes were, the poorer you were. Nobles had access to any fabric they wanted, while peasants and lower classes wore belted tunics (longer for the women), leather shoes, and stockings. Later on, some people wore hats. Lower class women’s clothes were made of wool, but richer women’s clothing was very layered and had colorful and detailed fabric.



Have you ever thought of what would happen if you were in an arranged marriage? How would you feel if you married someone you might not have met before in your life? This might be how the women felt back then. The law says that women were able to marry at 12 years old (that’s how old I turning next week! I could never imagine getting married now!) and boys could marry at 14. Noble weddings normally ended with feasting and celebration.



And that’s how life was in Medieval Scotland!




Sources:







Article posted February 3, 2012 at 02:06 PM GMT • comment • Reads 96



Article posted February 6, 2012 at 01:50 PM GMT • comment • Reads 45



From the Girl in the Cage Research Project was that the weapons used in the medieval times were barbaric and harsh. They would stab people with various knife attached to each hand. The battle strategies where very smart. For example, a siege is when the enemy would surround a castle and wait until the people inside the castle starved (because of the lack of food) or surrendered. I learned things I would have never learned from this project.



Article posted February 6, 2012 at 01:50 PM GMT • comment • Reads 45



Article posted February 2, 2012 at 03:50 PM GMT • comment • Reads 50



Women in Medieval times roles and difficulties varied depending on wealth. Noblewomen’s job was to run the castle and estate when her husband was away, have sons to continue the family name and to inherit land, and to set up parties, and entertain guests. Peasant women’s jobs were to do all the housework, some of the farm work, sew, and help with her husbands business. Some of the difficulties that noblewomen faced were the fact that they had no choice in who they married. They married for political use. Other difficulties were that it was vital for them to have sons. Most women died in childbearing. Peasant women’s difficulties were that they could not marry without there parents consent, could not divorce her husband, were banned from many guilds (groups of people with the same skill), they were paid less for jobs then men, and could not inherit land from her parents if she had any surviving brothers. The only way she could inherit land was if she was widowed. This is where I got my information.



Eastwood, Kay. Women and Girls in the Middle Ages. Canada : Crabtree, 2004. Print.



Truman , Chris. "Medieval Women." historylearningsite.co.uk. N.p., 2012. Web. 31, Jan 2012. <http://www.historylearningsite.co.uk/medieval_women.htm>.



Kowalski, Kathiann. "Women's Work is Never Done." Gale Student Resources In Context. Appleseeds , 2010. Web. Jan. 27, 2012. <http://ic.galegroup.com/ic/suic/MagazinesDetailsPage/MagazinesDetailsWindow?displayGroupName=Magazines&disableHighlighting=false&prodId=SUIC&action=e&windowstate=normal&catId=&documentId=GALE|A240863266&mode=view>



Article posted February 2, 2012 at 03:50 PM GMT • comment • Reads 50



Article posted February 3, 2012 at 02:17 AM GMT • comment • Reads 53



Geography for England, Wales, and Scotland Summery



 



            The geography for Wales, Scotland, and England are very similar to each other. They are all very cloudy and have mountains. Wales has a warmer climate than Scotland and gets a lot of rain during October to January. The south part of England is low-lying land with some hills. The temperature con be 70°F in the summer but 30°F in the winter.  Scotland has over 186 islands and has three sections called the highlands, the lowlands, and the Uplands. They are each very similar in many ways.



 



Sources




"Times New Roman"">Waldron, Melanie. Countries around the World:Scotland. 1st. Chicago: Heinemann Library, 2012. 5-48. Print.




"Times New Roman"">Barrow, Mandy. "Terrain and Climate." British life and culture. Woodlands Junior School, 2012. Web. 2 Feb 2012. <[LINK]>.




"Times New Roman"">Craddon, T.. "Wales physical characteristics." . N.p., 2012. Web. 2 Feb 2012. <[LINK]>.




"Times New Roman""> 



 



 



 



Article posted February 3, 2012 at 02:17 AM GMT • comment • Reads 53



Article posted February 3, 2012 at 12:06 AM GMT • comment • Reads 55



I learned a lot in this project about monks and nuns. I learned that they lived a very solitary life. What you usually did in the day was pray, go to church services, work, and then go to bed. I also learned that monks and nuns lived together in a place called a monastery and eventually the nuns made their own house where they worshipped and slept. The word monks come from the word monos (which means solitary) and monasterion (which means religion). Monks and nuns would usually become monks when they are younger and there parents had promises to the church or they had more children than they can handle, but sometimes people became monks and nuns because their spouse died and they were lonely, they wanted to grow closer to God, some even came as a punishment for a minor crime. There is a lot of valuable information that I have learned and I think I am very benefitted with this knowledge and will use it in the near future.



 



 



Carr, Karren. "Christian Nuns." KIDIPEDE. N.p., 2012. Web. 29 Jan 2012. <[LINK] >.



 



Knight, Kevin. "Monk." New Advent. N.p., 2009. Web. 27 Jan 2012. <[LINK] >.



 



Barter, James. A Medieval Monk. New York: Lucent Books, 2009. 14, 25, 27, 35, 64. Print.

Article posted February 3, 2012 at 12:06 AM GMT • comment • Reads 55



Article posted February 22, 2012 at 01:38 PM GMT • comment • Reads 46



Medieval Weapons and War Tactics



 



The weapon you were given depended on what social class you were. If you were lower class your weapons ranged from pole arms, battle axes, longbows and more. The Knights however used medieval swords, shields, and they were trained to use lances. Every knight had training with the lance, sword, and dagger before they even stepped on the battlefield. One of the war tactics of their time was surrounding the city and cutting off all food supply until they surrendered. They also ran with long spears to counter a cavalry charge.



 



Sources:



Book: Medieval Weapons and Warfare



Internet Source: Wikipedia: Medieval Warfare



URL: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medieval_warfare#Strategy_and_tactics



 



Internet Source: Middles Ages Weapons



URL: http://www.meddle-ages.org.uk/middle-ages-weapons.htm



 

Article posted February 22, 2012 at 01:38 PM GMT • comment • Reads 46



Article posted February 3, 2012 at 03:10 PM GMT • comment • Reads 39



Girl In a Cage



Everyday Life 1300



           



               The Girl in a Cage book is set in the in the middle ages or the medieval times. I learned that the times back then were very different. Women and children were treated very differently then men. It was a male denomination. Two classes, nobles and peasants divided the people.  The food they ate was mostly eaten with hands. The peasants weren’t very clean because there wasn’t much water for them, although the nobles had clean warm water warmed by fire.  It was all about money, the more money you had the better things you would get and the better quality clothes, food, and treatment. They were very religious they believed in God and that the devil wanted to harm them. I think that learning about what is going on in the book before we read it will help us understand the book better.

Article posted February 3, 2012 at 03:10 PM GMT • comment • Reads 39



Article posted February 16, 2012 at 03:32 PM GMT • comment • Reads 37



            England, Scotland, and Wales are a series of islands of the west coast of Europe. They make up the U.K. Scotland is made up of the Highlands, the Central Lowlands, and the Southern Uplands. It is usually very overcast, meaning it is very rainy, misty, and cloudy. England is a very small island and is covered in wetlands. The terrain is very swampy and low-lying allowing birds and plants to have a home there. Finally, Wales is rugged and almost completely surrounded by water. It is very cool and wet all year. These three islands make up one country, but are different in some ways.



Article posted February 16, 2012 at 03:32 PM GMT • comment • Reads 37



Article posted February 3, 2012 at 03:00 PM GMT • comment • Reads 51



 Edward Longshanks the First ruled from 1272 to 1307. He came to rule after Alexander the third and his granddaughter Margaret, Maid of Norway died four years later. He appointed a man named John Balliol to rule to extend Scotland’s rule. Later during a war he rebelled but was defeated by Edward and surrendered. 



The people of Scotland hated and tried to rebel often against Edward because of his harsh punishments and evil ways of rule. One day he was very angry and made a cage and not only locked the captured Countess of Buchan inside, but Robert the Bruce’s daughter and his twelve-year old daughter.



Robert the Bruce’s daughter is held as ransom against him. He was born at Westminster in June 1239.  He married Eleanor of Castile.



Contributions-Best ruler and one of the successful monarchs of England. Accomplishments in war and in law earned him the name-“English Justinian” He was a dangerous and clever man and continued to fight for more land. He never chose sides in the baron war, but when his father was captured his allegiance was given to Henry.

Article posted February 3, 2012 at 03:00 PM GMT • comment • Reads 51



Article posted February 2, 2012 at 03:14 PM GMT • comment • Reads 62

In 1314 Robert Bruce led them in the decisive battle of Bannockburn.



Robert Bruce



Robert the Bruce was king of Scotland from 1306 to 1329. He won a famous victory against the English at the Battle of Bannockburn and freed Scotland from English rule. In this battle the Scotland came out on top, defeated England, and won the battle.

Article posted February 2, 2012 at 03:14 PM GMT • comment • Reads 62



Article posted March 1, 2012 at 06:28 PM GMT • comment • Reads 35





Kildrummy Castle



 



There used to be a castle in Scotland called Kildrummy Castle. I did research on it and was surprised to find out that it was actually interesting. I found out that Kildrummy used to be owned by Robert the Bruce but went under siege and that lead to the death of many other Scottish people. In 1374 the castle’s heiress Isobel was taken and forced to marry Alexander Stewart who took Kildrummy and claimed the title Earl of Mar. Then it was taken over by James 1 in 1435 and became a royal castle until Elphinstone in 1507. Then it was abandoned in 1716. It then became the ruins of one of the most extensive castles in Scottish history. I thought that researching about it would be boring but it was actually intriguing and I hope other people enjoy learning about it as well.






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Article posted March 1, 2012 at 06:28 PM GMT • comment • Reads 35



Article posted February 3, 2012 at 02:19 AM GMT • comment • Reads 40

We can learn a lot from monks and nuns. Monks and nuns were very religious. They had a lot of work, strict schedules, and limted contact with the outside world. They contributed to religion and helping others. They really were strong and I am very awed at what they did evey day. I admire them very much.







Article posted February 3, 2012 at 02:19 AM GMT • comment • Reads 40



Article posted February 3, 2012 at 02:15 PM GMT • comment • Reads 51




The term feudalism is used to designate the social, military, political, and sometimes economic relationships found in western medieval Europe.

was a social system that developed during the period called the Middle Ages in Europe.

Feudalism is the system of political organization prevailing in Europe from the 9th to about the 15th centuries.
The social structure of the Middle Ages was organized round the system of Feudalism. Feudalism in practice meant that the country was not governed by the king but by individual lords, or barons, who administered their own estates, dispensed their own justice, minted their own money, levied taxes and tolls, and demanded military service from vassals.




 

Article posted February 3, 2012 at 02:15 PM GMT • comment • Reads 51



Article posted February 3, 2012 at 02:29 PM GMT • comment • Reads 52

          Woman in the middle ages were very important. Without them the middle ages may have not been what it was. Women were completly dominated by men at the time, but they still became things like warriors, rulers, etc. As well as running the entire household they had to do their jobs and serve their husbands. A woman's day was a long and hard one and usually ended late at night. 

Article posted February 3, 2012 at 02:29 PM GMT • comment • Reads 52



Article posted February 2, 2012 at 03:47 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 47



                                                  England Wars and Rulers in the 1300's



 



In July 1346, Edward 111 invaded Normandy with an army between 12,000 and 16,000 men. His purpose for the attack was to collect booty (or money) for his troops, and to bring great shame upon King Phillip. His plan was a successJ The Black Prince (Edward prince of wales) invaded France again after their victory and Crecy. The French shoulders were all killed by there thousands. After that they faced Bertrand de Guesclin aka the hog in armor because of his ugly face. The British won, again. The Hundred years war is a war between England and France. The first battle took place at the sea, off the Flemish port of Sluys. The battle was at sea and a little on land. They used crossbows, cannon balls, and catapults for weapons mostly. They also had some on land and hand to hand fighting going on at land and used knifes as well. The war was mostly a Weapon victory for England and they won the war. 



 



Chrisp, Peter. Warfare. Farmington Hills: Hodder Wayland, 2004. Print.



 



Hundred Years' War.
mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"">" Compton's by Britannica. Encyclopædia Britannica Online School Edition.



Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., 2012. Web. 2 Feb. 2012.


<
http://school.eb.com/all/comptons/article-9274989
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Trueman, Chris. The Hundred Years War. Massachusetts : BA, Hons, 2000. Web.



Article posted February 2, 2012 at 03:47 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 47



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