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“The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you.”
― B.B. King

by Annsley B

teacher: Julie Hooper

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Article posted February 11, 2011 at 03:49 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 36

The Lovely Bones


Alice Sebold


 


      As our story starts out, the main character is the narator. She is also dead. Susie Salmon was a fourteen year old girl. It was 1973, dissapearances were unheard of. Susie was just like the rest of us, trying to get through junior high, trying to make something of herself. Only now, she is trapped inside her own perfect heaven,  tormented because she knows her murderer is still out there, and she cannot tell anyone. She was assaulted and murdered in a room under the ground. We know who her murderer is from the beginning, but we must watch and hold our breath as we watch him interact with her family after she has gone. Inside her own perfect heaven, Susie watches her family for years, as they grow apart after her death. The novel goes between Susie's heaven and her experiences within, and her family, following their battles with each other after her death. What can tear a family apart at the seams? The loss of a child.



      A major motion picture, The Lovely Bones is both a wonderful novel and movie. I highly reccomend either, but as usual, I prefer to read the book before seeing the movie. However, if you have already seen the movie, reading the book with answer any questions you might have about the movie, as it goes into much more detail.



Concluding, I adored this book. It is an emotion-gripping story with love and separation, death and life, and a memorable thought on loss.



 



-Annsley

Article posted February 11, 2011 at 03:49 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 36



Article posted February 11, 2011 at 03:01 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 39

 



Jerk, California  




Jonathan Friesen


     Sam Carrier has been mistreated his whole life. His stepdad, his peers. They all see him as the freak. Sam has Tourette's Syndrome. At six years old, he is beridden with a disease in which he looses control of his body. Twitches, shivers, shakes, and more overcome his body violently. His teachers call him socially maladaptive, or unable to socially adjust. Only, Sam knows it is not he that cannot adjust, it is the others who cannot adjust around him. He developes a secret crush on Naomi, a track runner who seems to be the only person who does not judge him based on his disease. Sam is apprenticed to George, a gardener and landscaper with a harsh view on life. George listens to him, but tries not to show his affection, using a rough and callused voice of reason. Abused by his stepdad, tortured by his own mind, Sam sets out on a twisted trail scribbled on a map passed down to him; a map with notations and dates directly refering to himself. A journey from place to place along the twisted map of his life.



 



     The author of this book struggles with Tourette's Syndrome. Having met Jonathan personally, I can vouch for the truth behind this novel. Jerk, California is a fictionized version of an autobiography, with exagerated instances taken from reality, and lessons anyone can learn from. He put a such a sense of truth into this novel, and I highly reccomend it.



 



-Annsley

Article posted February 11, 2011 at 03:01 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 39



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