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Welcome to Mr. Ullrich's Blog! This blog is for 8th Grade Earth Science and Physical Science students. We will learn topics such as Astronomy, Geology and Meteorology. This blog will give us a place to discuss, learn and develop these topics during the year. If you are not from our class please post lots of comments!

by Jessica S teacher: Mr. Ullrich
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Article posted December 10, 2011 at 02:37 PM GMT-5 • comment • Reads 44

Hey 8th Graders! Thought you'd like to know about a few really cool things happening around now. Yes, it relates to Earth Science, but it's really cool! It's dorky but we're all secretly a bit dorky, so.



First, there will be a total lunar eclipse tonight and it will be a blood-red lunar eclipse. HOWEVER, it will be on the West Coast, if I read correctly, so it sucks for us.



BUT, don't fret. The Geminids meteor shower will peak around the 13/14 of December. It might be late at night, but it'll be amazing. It may also be hard to see because of the moon, but it'd be cool to check it out, if you can. I know I'm going to be up, trying to catch a glimpse of some "shooting stars!"



Have a great weekend!



Always,



Jessica Sun



Sources (check them out!):http://darkskydiary.wordpress.com/2011/01/04/meteor-showers-for-2011-2012-ones-to-watch/



http://space.brevardtimes.com/2011/12/best-viewing-areas-for-december-10-2011.html

Article posted December 10, 2011 at 02:37 PM GMT-5 • comment • Reads 44



Article posted October 24, 2011 at 09:13 PM GMT-5 • comment • Reads 35

Hi, my name is Jessica Sun. 



Just wanted to welcome everyone! It's been a while since I've posted, but I hope you all keep up with your assignments. XD



For anyone who's skeptical about Earth Science with Mr. Ullrich, let me tell you, love it now while you can. You may not appreciate it now, but next year, trust me, you will. I miss this class so much and I still remember many of the things we learned because Mr. Ullrich makes things fun and easy to understand. Don't take advantage of it! You might not enjoy the class now, but I'll bet you will one day look back and realize how awesome it was.



I have a lot of homework now, so see ya! And once again, welcome to Earth Science, class of 2011-2012. Enjoy!



Remember sombreros! (You'll only get that later on...)



~Jessica Sun

Article posted October 24, 2011 at 09:13 PM GMT-5 • comment • Reads 35



Article posted April 5, 2011 at 10:25 PM GMT-5 • comment • Reads 35

Wow, it's been a while! A long while. xD



So anyways, we just had our Weathering, Erosion, Deposition test (which was not very easy). I'm really glad it's over, but now we're starting review tests. Arggg. Wonder what we're learning next...obviously topic 11. =P



I'm going to try to post more often, but with everything I have (softball, Religion, dance, tutoring, extra help, homework, studying, life) it'll be hard. 



~Jess <3

Article posted April 5, 2011 at 10:25 PM GMT-5 • comment • Reads 35



Article posted February 8, 2011 at 06:18 PM GMT-5 • comment (10) • Reads 35

What are tornadoes?



A tornado is a destructive force of nature. It is a violently rotating column of air extending from a thunderstorm to the ground. They are capable of creating tremendous destruction with wind speeds up to 250 mph or more.



How are they formed?



Thunderstorms in warm, moist air in advance of eastward-moving cold fronts can often cause tornadoes. These thunderstorms develop along a "dryline," which separates very warm, moist air to the east from hot, dry air to the west. These torando-producing thunderstorms may also form as the dryline moves east during the afternoon hours. Tornadoes can also occasionally accompany tropical storms and hurricanes that move over land.                                                                                      More specifically, this is how they form:                                                                                                            Before thunderstorms develop, a change in wind direction and an increase in wind speed with increasing height creates an invisible, horizontal spinning effects in the lower atmosphere. Rising air within the thunderstorm updraft tilts the rotating air from horizontal to vertical. An area of rotation, 2-6 miles wide, now extends through much of the storm. Most strong and violent torandoes form within this area of strong rotation. 



Where are tornadoes common in?



They are most commonly found along the front range of the Rocky Mountains, the Plains, and the WesternStates. however, they can form almost anywhere.



How violent can tornadoes get and how weak can they be?



Weak tornadoes, 69% of all tornadoes, last about 1-10+ minutes. They cause less than 5% of tornado deaths, and their wind speed is less than 110 mph.                                                                Strong tornadoes, 29% of all tornadoes, last 20+ minutes. They cause almost 30% of all tornado deaths, and their wind speed is 110-205 mph.                                                                                              Violent Tornadoes, 2% of all tornadoes, last an hour or more. They cause 70% of all tornado deaths, and their wind speed can be anything above 205 mph.



How can you tell when there will be a tornado?



You can listen to the radio and watch the news for any warnings. Also, look for dark, often greenish skies, a wall cloud, large hail, and a loud roar similar to a freight train.



Remember, tornadoes can occur almost anywhere so always have a family plan.



If you want to see some tornadoes on video, click this link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=43VoMesUd2Q



Some pictures:



 



~Jess



Source: http://www.nssl.noaa.gov/edu/safety/tornadoguide.html

Article posted February 8, 2011 at 06:18 PM GMT-5 • comment (10) • Reads 35



Article posted January 28, 2011 at 06:56 PM GMT-5 • comment (2) • Reads 35

There are many different types of energy in this beautiful world of ours. One of those is wind energy. Wind energy is mainly used to generate electricity, and it [wind] is a renewable energy source. Wind energy is really just energy from the wind. Wind is created when warm air over land expands and rises, while the heavy, cool air rushed to take it's place. (This is what happens during daytime. At night time it is the opposite.) This will always happen, so we will always have wind.



We can generate this wind energy using wind turbines. Wind turbines use blades to collect the wind's kinetic energy. The wind flows over the blades, which creates a lift (like airplane wings), and it causes it to turn. The blades are connect to a drive shaft which will turn an electric generator and produce electricity. 



Wind energy is used all around the world, although many countries don't use wind turbines to get the energy. In the US, about 1.3% of total electricity generation came from wind energy (in 2008). Here in the US, electricity generated by the wind has increased in the past few years. So it's not that common yet, but soon it will be. Especially since the cost is decreasing due to new technology, and because of tax breaks and green pricing programs.



 



Drawbacks/limitations:



1)It is very hard to find a good site to place wind power plants due to location (preferably rounded hills, open plains, shorelines, and mountain gaps) and because wind speed changes by season. (But on the bright side, the seasonal variations are a good match for electricity demands of the regions.)



2) They are large and make a loud noise, which people do not like. Also, with it being so large, many birds and bats are killed by the blades.



3) Making the metals and other materials for wind turbines and concrete for their foundations require energy, mainly through burning fossil fuels. (But, studies show that the amount of clean energy created is greater than the amount it takes to make and install them.)



Positive Aspects:



1) It is a renewable source of energy, so it will never have a limit.



2) They, the wind turbines, create a clean source of energy. Along with this, it has fewer environmental impacts than other energy sources. They also do not release emissions that pollute the air or water and do not require water to cool down.



3) They may reduce the amount of electricity generated from fossil fuels, therefore reducing the amount of air pollution, CO2 emissions, and water use of fossil fuel power plants.



4) Many wind projects, or wind farms, are located on farm, grazing, and forest land. The extra income allow farmers and ranchers to stay in business and keep their property from being developed for other uses.



Pictures:



.



Source: http://www.eia.doe.gov/kids/energy.cfm?page=wind_home-basics (Great site with lots of information, although I already mentioned most of it. *hint, hint* This contains some information we learned in class and that we might have to know. *hint, hint*)



~Jess 

Article posted January 28, 2011 at 06:56 PM GMT-5 • comment (2) • Reads 35



Article posted January 9, 2011 at 04:14 PM GMT-5 • comment (4) • Reads 34

Most of us think and have been taught that the universe was created millions of years ago after the Big Bang, right? Well, scientists, Roger Penrose and Vahe Gurzadyan, believe that the Big Bang was NOT the beginning. They say that the Big Bang was part of a series of "bangs." Basically, they think that the universe has had many births, as well as many deaths. Not many scientists are quick to agree, but the two scientists are trying to prove that their theory may be correct.





^(Big Bang)



Link to article: http://www.sciencenews.org/view/generic/id/67173/title/FOR_KIDS_When_the_universe_began_..._again



 

Article posted January 9, 2011 at 04:14 PM GMT-5 • comment (4) • Reads 34



Article posted December 26, 2010 at 02:41 PM GMT-5 • comment (4) • Reads 36

Hi everyone! We are on winter break right now. Merry (Late) Christmas to those of you who celebrate! I had a great Christmas Eve with my godmother and her family. Christmas wasn't as awesome, but it was still good. I got some really awesome gifts. I hope you guys did too.



Happy (Almost) New Year's to everyone! I hope you guys all watch the ball drop. I know I probably will!



My family and I will probably be going skiing sometime this week (if I get better).



 



Happy Holidays!



~Jess

Article posted December 26, 2010 at 02:41 PM GMT-5 • comment (4) • Reads 36



Article posted December 26, 2010 at 02:25 PM GMT-5 • comment (2) • Reads 36

We had a HUGE Astronomy unit. We learned a lot about the Sun, seasons, Moon, planets, and our universe in general. My favorite part would have to be learning about stars. I've always loved looking at stars and I've wondered about finding constellations (we didn't really talk about constellations in class though).



It was great to learn about Astronomy and I was kind of glad we did. It was hard though and I will admit it. I spent a lot of extra time studying for this topic than I have in a while. It was an overall interesting unit.





~Jess

Article posted December 26, 2010 at 02:25 PM GMT-5 • comment (2) • Reads 36



Article posted December 10, 2010 at 08:11 PM GMT-5 • comment (5) • Reads 33

As we've been studying the solar system, I've realized how often the names of stars, moons, and even planets are in mythology (of all sorts).



 I decided to spend my free time looking up a few of them and I made a list:



 .Olympus Mon (Mount Olympus in Latin)




.Neptune



.Venus



.Earth



.Mars



.Jupiter



.Saturn



.Uranus



.Pluto



.Phobos



.Deimos



.Io



Europa



.Ganymede



.Callisto



.Thebe



.Metis



.Amalthea



.Himalia



.Elara



.Pasiphae



.Sinope



.Lysithea



.Carme



.Ananke



.Leda



.Adrastea



.Titan



.Rhea



.Iapetus



.Dione



.Tethys



.Enceladus



.Mimas



.Hyperion



.Prometheus



.Pandora



.Phoebe



.Janus



.Epimetheus



.Helene



.Telesto



.Calypso



.Atlas



.Pan



.Cordelia



.Ophelia



.Bianca



.Juliet



.Puck



.Miranda



.Ariel



.Titania



.Oberon



.Triton



.Nereid



.Naiad



.Thalassa



.Despina



.Larissa



.Proteus



.Galatea



.Charon



.Hydra



.Nix



I didn't really explain, but if you were curious most of these are related to Greek Mythology, but not all.



If you want more information on any of these, leave a comment and I'll get back to you.



 



~Jess <3






Article posted December 10, 2010 at 08:11 PM GMT-5 • comment (5) • Reads 33



Article posted November 17, 2010 at 11:11 PM GMT-5 • comment (5) • Reads 33

Article posted November 17, 2010 at 11:11 PM GMT-5 • comment (5) • Reads 33



Article posted November 17, 2010 at 08:57 PM GMT-5 • comment (6) • Reads 37



Hello everyone!



Now I know that Mr. Ullrich's main blog already mentions this topic, but I wanted to find out more about it.



During today and tomorrow, it will be the best time this year to see the Leonid Meteor Shower. The best time to try to see it is in the last two or three hours BEFORE sunrise, when the moon has set. You might be able to see from about 15-20 meteors PER HOUR!



If you want to look at it, you should try looking toward the constellation Leo in the eastern sky. From there, you are able to see "shooting stars" from the Lenonids. 



If you do decide to wake up that early to see it, make sure you are bundled up. Also, you might want a blanket or reclining chair so that you don't get a stiff neck.



 



If you'd like more information, I used Space.com. The link is: http://www.space.com/spacewatch/leonid-meteor-shower-peaking-now-101116.html



 



Questions: (These are easier to answer if you read the whole article)



1) Every few years, there are much more meteors than normal (from hundreds to thousands per hour). How often does this happen? If the last one was in 2002, when will the next one be (Hint: If you read the article, it tells you how many years are in between each)?



 



2) Is it easier to see the shower in/near the city or in the countryside? Why?



 



3) The article states that "The Leonid meteor shower is an annual event that returns every mid-November. The shower is caused by material left behind the comet Tempel-Tuttle when it passes near Earth's orbit during its regular trip through the solar system. "



If this is true then what would happen if the orbit changed? What would happen if it only passed near Earth's orbit every, say, 3 years?



 



4) Personal Opinion: Would you be willing to wake up that early just to see the shower that happens annually? Why or why not? If you would, would you want to see it every year or just once? If you wouldn't, would you at least want to look at photos and videos of it?



(My opinion is that I would see it once in a while. I'd see it and then once the memory starts to fade, I'd watch it again. That way it'll stay ingrained in my memory and I don't have to see it every year.)



 



If you'd like to see a short video of last year's meteor shower, visit this link: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2009/11/16/meteor-show-november-2009_n_359955.html



 



Here are some  more pictures as well:





 



Enjoy!



 



~Jess <3 [=

Article posted November 17, 2010 at 08:57 PM GMT-5 • comment (6) • Reads 37



Article posted October 25, 2010 at 08:52 PM GMT-5 • comment (6) • Reads 35

Hi guys! So it's been a while and I've been lazy so I've been putting this off, but here I go...




I think that it is very possible for there to be LIFE on other planets, but I'm not so certain about aliens. Even if there were, we make aliens seem like they're green skinned and all that stuff, but what if, if there were any, they looked just like us? Has anyone ever thought that?



Well now more than ever, there is talk of other living things, or aliens, because of the discovery of Gliese 581g. (I don't know what that means or why it was named that way so don't ask me.) Apparently, it is far enough away from the sun so that the water will not boil, but close enough so that the water won't freeze. It is very important that it has water because otherwise, it cannot sustain human life. Without water there would be no plants, without plants, herbivores would die, without herbivores, carnivores would die, and therefore, we'd end up dying (such a sad thought). This being said, a planet like Earth is very hard to find and therefore very unique. First off, it is hard to find any planets far enough and yet close enough to contain water. We know it is hard to find because all these years, they've never found one that has water, until possibly, Gliese 581g (I'm not sure if this is accurate, but this is what I've heard).



That being said, I do believe there MIGHT be a slight chance that there is LIFE on other planets, not necessarily ALIENS though. Even if Gliese 581g doesn't have the water or isn't right, I'm sure that one day in the near future, we'll find another one. There is almost no limit to what we can find out (until we find out EVERYTHING, but that's highly improbable).




For you're enjoyment, here are some pictures of what aliens are thought to look like:





 (yup, Yoda from Star Wars, but hey, he's "from a galaxy far, far away".



 

Article posted October 25, 2010 at 08:52 PM GMT-5 • comment (6) • Reads 35



Article posted October 15, 2010 at 07:31 PM GMT-5 • comment (1) • Reads 32




create your own personalized map of the USA

or write about it on the open travel guide



It's very little compared to say, Mr. Ullrich's. (I didn't count states I've flown over otherwise there'd be a couple more).

Article posted October 15, 2010 at 07:31 PM GMT-5 • comment (1) • Reads 32



Article posted October 12, 2010 at 05:11 PM GMT-5 • comment (2) • Reads 33

So in our Earth Science period, a question was asked a few days ago about when the next solar eclipse in the US would be. I am reading a book called Every Soul a Star, and at the end, the author wrote a little information and according to her research, the next total solar eclipse in the US will be on August 21, 2017 and can be seen from Oregon all the way to South Carolina



If I could I would love to see it, but hey, you never know right?



 



~Jess

Article posted October 12, 2010 at 05:11 PM GMT-5 • comment (2) • Reads 33



Article posted October 9, 2010 at 07:48 PM GMT-5 • comment (9) • Reads 34

Hi everyone! I'm Jessica. Let me introduce myself.



I am in 8th grade. I have many hobbies. Some of them include reading, writing, dancing, playing my violin, singing, listening to music, watching TV, playing soccer and softball, etc.



Article posted October 9, 2010 at 07:48 PM GMT-5 • comment (9) • Reads 34



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Hi guys. My name is Jessica. I have many hobbies and such, which you can see on my first post. I am looking forward to having a great year in Science! Locations of visitors to this page

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