Login
Copyright (c) 2014 by LRLI Conditions of Use    Privacy Policy Return to Blogmeister
LRLI -- Blogmeister

LRLI


The students' blogs have been transferred to 8th grade.

by LRLI teacher: Rye 8th Team

Article posted February 12, 2013 at 06:21 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 227

Las líneas son muy grandes. ¡Alugnas lineas son de 10 millas de largo! Un pájaro es el tamaña de un campo de fútbol. Para ver las líneas, tienes que hacer un viaje. Las líneas representan las constelaciones. El desierto tiene roca volcánica. Las líneas apuntan al sol. Las líneas de Nazca son el mayor misterio arqueológico. Hay más de 300 líneas. Las criaturas en las líneas siguen vivos en la costa.





 

Article posted February 12, 2013 at 06:21 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 227



Article posted May 16, 2012 at 01:57 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 100

Article posted May 16, 2012 at 01:57 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 100



Article posted May 3, 2012 at 04:48 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 255

Overview: 



For this post, we were assigned to compare the cultures of Germans and Romans. We were also learning how to write a 5 paragraph essay. We were not supposed to use our opinion, and just state facts. This essay will tell you the different ways of life the Germans and Romans lived.



 



Compare Germans to Romans Essay






       If you were put in a time machine, and the two places you could choose to go were early Germany and early Rome, which would you choose? You are going to find out the difference between the German’s villages and the Roman’s cities, the Germanic warriors and the Roman soldiers, and finally, the difference in their government, and how people would be punished. You will see that there are huge differences between the two civilizations.





One of the main differences between Germans and Romans is their way of life; especially the fact the Germans had villages, whereas Romans had cities. The Germans depended on their farms and animals. Their houses were long thatched-roof huts with open spaces around them. The family lived in one end, and the animals lived in stalls on the other end. The animals lived so close to the people because the Germans depended on the animal’s body heat to keep their huts warm. Inside of the huts, it was relatively bare. Most people just had wooden tables and benches in their homes, but wealthier Germans also had wall hangings and carpets. The Romans, on the other hand, had big cities. At this time, the cost of living was very high. The rich Romans lived in a domus, which is a house with marble walls, colored stone floors, and windows made of small panes of glass. They also had furnaces to heat the rooms, instead of an animal’s body heat. In the domuses, they also had pipes to distribute water to even the upper floors of their house. The Romans, who were not as wealthy, which consisted of most of the 1 million people who lived in Rome, lived in apartments called islands. The islands were at least 6 stories high. The ground floor was where most shops were. The shops opened onto the street from large arched doorways. The higher up you lived in the apartment, the less you had to pay.





Another big difference between Romans and Germans were the soldiers. Once the Romans set up a republic, they had to protect it by gaining more territory. The reason they were able to gain the territory was because of their army. Unlike the Germans, they had their army organized into legions. Every legion had 5,000 soldiers, who were called legionaries. Those legionaries were then divided up into 60-120 soldiers. Having legions made fighting a lot easier, compared to having a phalanx. The legion was smaller, so they could move faster and more flexibly, unlike soldiers in a phalanx, who fought as a group and could only attack from one direction. The groups in a legion were able to split off the main body and attack from the sides or back. The soldiers were very well trained because they spent hours practicing, they went on long marches every day, and they were healthy and well fed. The Germans did things much differently than the Romans. The men started training when they were still young boys. They spent a lot of their time fighting, hunting, fishing, and making weapons. A ceremony would be held when a boy reached manhood, and he would receive a shield and spear which would be carried at all times. They were divided into clans, which was family based. All the respect and loyalty was given to their military leader called a cheiftain. The cheiftain was originally elected by a group of warriors, but later on it became hereditary. The cheiftain gave the warriors food and shelter.  He also kept the peace among warriors. The Germans really loved war because of their religion. The gods they believed in liked to fight and hunt.





           The final difference between the Romans and Germans is their government and laws. In other words, how they kept the peace and how they dealt with crimes. The Germans thought that they should memorize their laws instead of writing them down, so the parents passed down all the laws to their children, and they would pass them down to their children. The German rulers believed that the only time laws could be changed was if the people approved. Because of over-drinking, Germans would recklessly fight a lot, so courts were set up where judges would listen to each side of the story and decide what would bring peace. The citizens would decide who was guilty and innocent. Oath-helpers would assist someone who was being accused of a crime. They would swear to tell the truth of what really happened, and tried to help the guilty German to be granted innocent. If the German didn’t have an oath-helper, his innocence would be decided during an ordeal. The ordeal was basically torture, where the German would have to walk on hot coals or soak their arm in boiling water. Then, the person would get their hands and feet tied together, and he would be thrown into a lake. If the person sunk, he was innocent, and if he floated, he was guilty. The courts could press charges called wergeld. The amount of money the German had to pay would depend on how bad the crime was. For example, if a German harmed a cheiftain, the wergeld would be higher than if he hurt a warrior. The German citizens would decide if the person guilty should pay the fine or not. This system the Germans used was not very fair to everyone. Wealth and importance depended on the penalty rather than the actual crime, however, the German laws kept peace. The Romans had much different ways of governing their people. First of all, they wrote down all of their laws on the Twelve Tables. The Roman judges wrote down new laws during the Pax Romana. The principles developed for the laws were fair to everyone. They were believed to be established because they were reasonable, not because the government had power to make the Romans obey them. Romans were innocent until proven guilty and Roman laws were standardized, or all equal in all parts of the empire.





           So, do you now know where you would want to go, if you had the option in a time machine? Do you think the Germans and Romans are similar, or different? The Germans lived very simple lives in huts with their farms and families, while the Romans had the opposite. Their fighting styles and groupings were different, as well. The Romans had more job options, like running shops, when the Germans just depended on their farms or trading. Both Romans and Germans were very clever at governing their people, but they did it in very different ways.  Overall, Germans and Romans are completely different societies, but both were fairly successful.



 

Article posted May 3, 2012 at 04:48 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 255



Article posted March 16, 2012 at 06:18 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 129

Article posted March 16, 2012 at 06:18 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 129



Article posted March 8, 2012 at 05:44 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 76

April 6th







This is the journal of Iulia Calculus. It was found by archeologists in the barracks. Iulia Calculus was a roman gladiator who was captured by the Roman army in Gaul. The Romans had been having gladiators fight since 264 BCE when slaves, who were the first gladiators, fought at Junius Brutus Pera's funeral. The fight was arranged to honor him. Calculus trained to be a Hoplomachus gladiator, which you will find out more about in his journal. When he was captured, he left his wife and his two daughters. He was previously a farmer. The Gaul slaves were known as barbarians to the Romans, which means that they are very different from them. He and many other enslaved Gauls had to march hundreds of miles to Rome. Once they got to Rome, they were handed off to a slave dealer who brought the slaves to a slave market. Iulia Calculus was bought by a man who wanted him to become a Roman gladiator. He spent a lot of money to bring him to ludus gladitorius, which was the training school. I have seen other people training to fight, and I now know more about the styles of gladiators. There is the Hoplomachus, which is what I’m training to be. When I fight, I will have a bronze circular shield, a spear, leg protection, and a helmet most likely topped with a griffin head and a tall crescent shaped crest. The most vulnerable of the styles is the Retiarius, because the only protection this gladiator has is a shoulder guard called a galerus, and it is worn on the left shoulder. They have a trident, which they use as a weapon, and a net to capture or whip their opponent. The Retiarius mostly fights the Secutor who wears lots of heavy armor. The Murmillo has a big and long shield called a suctum and an infantry sword called a gladius. On the gladiator’s left leg, they have a leg greave and padded over boot.
They wear a large dorsal fin helmet, and the name “Murmillo” originates from the word mormyros, which means sea fish. Having fights between Murmillo and Thraex or Murmillo and Hoplomachus are very popular. There are finally Equites, who are the horsemen. They come into the arena on horse but sometimes during combat they fight on foot.



 



July 20th



 



I am at the Coliseum, and have been able to look around to describe what it looks like. The structure of it is very interesting. There is an underground level called the substructure, which is where I am now. There are 32 cages where the animals and men are kept. It is literally a zoo down here. In the substructure, there are passageways that lead to lifts. When it's time for battle, I will go up to the lifts and be winched up into the arena. A floor above the substructure, there is a place where handlers can see us gladiators and animals. This is also where the handlers winch us up. In the arena, the spectators sit by rank because Romans hate mixed mobs. The Senators and wealthy people sit in front, but there is a high parapet separating the front row seats from the battlegrounds so the spectators won’t be in danger. The women sit on wooden seats in the way back. For the bachelors and soldiers, there are separate seats. The Coliseum goes up 160 feet (48.5 meters) and goes up in 4 tiers corresponding to the tiers of seats inside. Since it can get extremely hot in the arena, there are awnings to provide shade. There is a notice that says “Vela Erunt” which means, “There will be awnings” to encourage the spectators. The games used to be held in the Forum, but now the Coliseum is the most recognizable building in Rome At each of the first 3 levels of the structure, there are 80 half columns that are made of travertine stone, and they frame an arch opening. Light comes through the arch to the passageways. Overall, 50,000 people can be seated in the Coliseum.

Article posted March 8, 2012 at 05:44 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 76



Article posted November 29, 2011 at 03:06 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 99

Article posted November 29, 2011 at 03:06 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 99



Article posted November 29, 2011 at 03:04 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 213

1. I did research on the Peloponnesian war.

2. Yes, we did divide the work. I did all of the affects and spell check. i also wrote the cause of the war and did the path and arrows.

3. i found information for my project by using Ebsco and my text book. I also used the 100 decisive battles book.

Article posted November 29, 2011 at 03:04 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 213



Article posted November 3, 2011 at 02:50 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 64

Dear Momma and Daddy, In this letter, I am going to tell you about what we learned in module 1, which was our first math unit. In that unit there are eight smaller sections. The sections we learned about were bar and line graphs, exponents, probability, frequency,and order of operations. When we learned about bar and line graphs, we tallied up all the 8th graders who were absent last year, and made it into a colorful graph. You wouldn’t believe how many people were absent! The day with the most absences was Tuesday-there were 168 people absent through out the year! With my best friend, we did a probability experiment where we picked 8 different colors of gumballs out of a bag. There 40 gumballs, and the colors were red, orange, yellow, green, blue, purple, and white. We did this 80 times! It was a fun experiment because now we have tons of gum leftover that’s always yummy to chew! During order of operations, we listened to this snazzy rap song where they talked about “pemdas”, which is the order you do to solve problems. “Pemdas” stands for parenthesis, exponents multiplication, division, addition, and subtraction. So, say I gave you this problem: (5+7)-11 you would solve it by first doing whats in parenthesis, and then what isn't, which is the -11. So, what would the answer be? You're right! It would be 1! Do you know how to do exponents? Well, if you don’t I will teach you! Ok..... So say I had the number 5 to the power of 2. In expodential form, it would look like this: 5 raised to the power of 2 . In standard form, it looks like this: 5*5 or 5 times 5. So, the answer would be 25! Sometimes people think that it means you do 5*2, but you times 5 twice, so 5*5. Well, that's just a little peak into what we are learning in math class! Stay tuned for the next letter where I will tell you what I learned in Module 2. Any who, I gotta go! Love you, bye!

Article posted November 3, 2011 at 02:50 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 64



Article posted October 12, 2011 at 05:50 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 109

Article posted October 12, 2011 at 05:50 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 109



Article posted October 12, 2011 at 05:49 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 81

Article posted October 12, 2011 at 05:49 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 81



Previous Entries All Entries       All Titles
Latest 10 Comments
Blog Entries
Login
Copyright (c) 2014 by LRLI Conditions of Use    Privacy Policy Return to Blogmeister