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The students' blogs have been transferred to 8th grade.

by TJLA teacher: Rye 8th Team

Title: Strawbery Banke (11/23/09)
Description: We visited Strawbery Banke in Portsmouth to view how Thanksgiving was celebrated by the families who lived there in different time periods.

Article posted November 23, 2009 at 06:04 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 537

3 things I learned at Strawberry Bank



1.I learned how to make a doll. We needed 2 pieces of string and 2 pieces of corn husk. Then we tied strings and folded the corn husk and we had dolls.

2.I learned how they cook food. We learned about the different foods they made and for what holidays they had food for.

3.I learned about the different ways they celebrated Thanksgiving. Like how they had lots of family members to celebrate at their house.



Article posted November 23, 2009 at 06:04 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 537



Article posted November 24, 2009 at 05:03 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 71

We had a field trip to a colonial museum. We learned about the history of Thanksgiving. I learned that various countries have different holidays to celebrate the harvest season. Although many people believe that Thanksgiving originated with the Pilgrims, Thanksgiving was celebrated in Europe previously. When Thanksgiving was first celebrated it was a day of praise where people would spend most of their time at church, and would either fast or eat limited amounts. Over time this tradition has changed tremendously.

Article posted November 24, 2009 at 05:03 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 71



Article posted December 22, 2009 at 06:48 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 62

Yesterday we went to Strawberry Banke to learn about the history of Thanksgiving over the years in Porstmouth, and the rest of America. I learned a couple of things. To point some out...

Thanksgiving was never an actually set date, instead the local governor would make a proclamation that would specify the date.

Around the Victorian era, wealthier families would fill baskets full of foods, ingredients, and knitted goods to deliver to poor people.

The Macy's day parade originated as a way to bring different peoples' celebrations of Thanksgiving together, and it is still going strong today.

Article posted December 22, 2009 at 06:48 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 62



Article posted December 22, 2009 at 07:05 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 69

Over the past two weeks, we have taken a drug and alcohol abuse program taught by a former drug and alcohol user Joe Flood. He talked about how drugs and alcohol kill your brain, and they can cause permanent, not just temporary damage to your system. Joe has firsthand experience with drugs, and alcoholism, so his program is to keep us from going down the same road that he did. He talked about not just that they are bad, but he gave specific examples as to what has happened, and what exactly happens to your brain. He talked about what alcohol poisoning is, and it is basically when your blood mixes with too much alcohol, and when it goes to your brain, the brain starts to shut down. Once that happens, you will start to become intoxicated, and eventually pass out. If no one bothers to treat you, you will most likely die. The program was a huge success, and it definitely helped my understanding of drugs and alcoholism.

Article posted December 22, 2009 at 07:05 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 69



Article posted December 2, 2009 at 07:01 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 49

 



I learned how to preserve food such as pumpkin, green beans, pickles, dried cod and jam.





 



Another very interesting thing I learned was that Abraham Lincoln was the one who declared thanksgiving as a national holiday for the U.S.





 



The last thing I learned was that the Russians drink their tea with a sugar cube in their mouth that's how it makes their tea really sweet.



Article posted December 2, 2009 at 07:01 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 49



Article posted November 23, 2009 at 06:20 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 46

My experience at Strawbery Banke was about Thanksgiving. My group went to different houses. The different houses we went to had different ways of celebrating Thanksgiving, like in the Jewish house we made mazta balls soup. Another house rich victory house were we made food bag for the poor.

Article posted November 23, 2009 at 06:20 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 46



Article posted November 23, 2009 at 06:13 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 42

1.I learned that in the olden days they had to do a lot of hard work and it took a lot of time,Like all of the food they made there was a big process they had to go through. I think that it was better to do it that way because it is healthier even though it takes a lot more time.



2.They had to make pies for about 100 people. Yikes! It took so long to make the pies because you couldn't just buy pie mixes like you can now.



3.The beds were either made of corn husks or feathers, in the winter they used feathers for winter and corn husks for the summer.

Article posted November 23, 2009 at 06:13 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 42



Article posted November 24, 2009 at 01:50 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 46

I did not know they made 100 pies and they stored some away to have them latter. They kept the pie in an extra room, possibly the attic for storage. They put food in the bag for the poor. They put many things in the bag including rice, sugar, flour, and corn.They put knots in the bag so they would not mix them up. The bag was put into a basket. They put other stuff in it like apples, 3 or 4 knitted things. In the kitchen, we did some chores. My favorite one was stringing the green beans. I also learned how to cook with 3 different settings over the fire. There were hooks and the pots went on the hooks. The hooks were different sizes. You could also put them in different places.

Article posted November 24, 2009 at 01:50 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 46



Article posted November 23, 2009 at 06:17 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 101

The first of the things that I found most interesting about our field trip was the way people lived in the NH climate. There were so many innovations and improvisations that were invaluable in New England's winters. One of which was the feather matresses. They provided excellent insulation during the cold winter's nights. In the summer, the settlers didn't need the heat of the feather mattress. They would simply open up the mattress, take out the feathers, and stuff it with something cooler.






 



The next was the layout of the settlement itself. Strawbery Banke used to be mud flats before it was filled in with hard materials in the 1600's. The settlement was much more crowded than it is now in it's golden age. There were more buildings, wharves, and docks, but they were taken out during the construction of Portsmouth for more space.






 



The final one is the way people ate. There were many ways of preserving food, like salting, drying, and turning fruit into jams and jellies. Vegetables were strung and hung over the fire to dry out. Vegetables and meats also could be salted as a way of preservation.Fruits were cut up, mixed with sugar, and turned into jam or jelly.

Article posted November 23, 2009 at 06:17 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 101



Article posted November 23, 2009 at 06:12 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 51

 





I learned quite a few things at Strawbery Banke. One thing I learned was that the wealthy people gave poor people a Thanksgiving basket which they filled with many things. They filled a pillow case with stuff like flour, rice, sugar, Indian meal and tied into a section from keeping the ingredients from mixing. The people also filled the baskets with meat, pies, knitted items and other small foods items. I also learned that wealthy people in the late 1800's had very large napkins. Mrs. Goodwin said “Would you rather wash 6 layers of dress or a large napkin.” I found this very interesting that children weren't allowed in the parlor until they were 16 years old.


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Article posted November 23, 2009 at 06:12 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 51



Article posted November 23, 2009 at 06:12 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 37

1.In the houses the kitchen was the biggest room because in the Winter they can sleep in the room. They can use wood but they mostly use coal for the fire. In front of the fire was bricks on the ground because sparks might fly and if it was wood it could catch the house on fire.



2.Some of the food, like cinnamon is grounded up the size of sand. You can put it in food for a flavor. You don't pound on the food, you just turn it and it will eventually be the size of sand. You can also ground spices so they will be the size of sand.



3. When people reserve a spot at a hotel they will have their own room and will be served food. When people just go in and ask for a room they will sleeping with other people some are strangers some might be somebody they know. Also if they just come in and ask for a room if they don't come in at the right time they will have to wait for food.

Article posted November 23, 2009 at 06:12 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 37



Article posted November 23, 2009 at 06:18 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 50

 



Thanksgiving Field Trip






 



I learned many new things about Thanksgiving during the field trip to Strawbery Banke. I discovered about how the people of the 1800's prepared their food and how much effort and time it took, I found out about how richer people gave out their food items to charity, and the way the children participated in the making of the feast.



The people who lived during the 1800's prepared their food by using many old tools. To make something like a soup, they would get all of their ingredients that they need, and put them into a pot with a handle. But before putting the ingredients in the pot, they needed to start a fire. So once the items were in the cooking pot, they would use an crane and hand the pot from a swinging clock-jack which was above the fire. To cook something like a pie, the people would have to heat up an oven-like part of the fireplace. Next, they would put the pie into the oven -like area. As a result of leaving the pie in the oven, the pie would cook and be good to eat! To cook a turkey, it would need to be placed on a spit, and turned slowly over the fire. There were some ways to make a delicious Thanksgiving meal!



Most richer people, like the Governor and his wife at the time, made baskets of goods to give to the poor. They gave away some cups of their flour, corn mill, sugar, and wheat. They also gave the poor knitted items, apples, and raisins. They put the grain items into a pillow case, and tied up every different part of the pillow case where the grains were in, so they wouldn't get mixed. They put in 3-4 knitted items per basket, and 2-3 apples, and a handful of raisins. The amount of grains that were put into each basket were 2 or 3 cups each. It was very interesting to learn about how and the amount of goods that were donated to the poorer people.



We learned also about the way that the children participated in making the Thanksgiving feast, and how they celebrated. One activity that the children did was to watch and take care of the younger children. Of course, it was the older children that did this. The way that they cared for the younger children was to play a game that we still do today, Hide and Seek. Children of all ages played a game called Blind Man's Buff. Although, before the feast, the children helped out their mothers in the kitchen. They helped with cooking the turkey, making the spices, crushing the corn, and preparing the pies. I thought it was very interesting to learn about how the children of the past participated in the Thanksgiving feast.



The field trip that we took to Strawbery Banke was a great experience, and I learned a lot about why we celebrate the holiday of Thanksgiving.

Article posted November 23, 2009 at 06:18 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 50



Article posted December 22, 2009 at 02:38 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 44

I recently went to Strawbery Banke for a field trip to learn more about Thanksgiving and why we celebrate it. I liked it when people acted like they lived in the 1900's. When you knocked on the house they would pretend it was theirs.



One thing that I learned was that there was this night that the poor people would knock on the rich peoples door and beg for food and goods. The rich would put different ingredients in the pillow cases that the poor carry around to different houses.



Matzah is a type of a large chip that many people turned into many different things.



The last thing that I learned was that when Thanksgiving came they would usually make 100 pies to preserve the food. I enjoyed visiting there and hope to do it again.

Article posted December 22, 2009 at 02:38 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 44



Article posted November 24, 2009 at 02:29 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 41

When I was at Strawberry Banke learned a couple of things. One was that rich people made gift baskets with some clothing and food in them and gave them to the poor who went door to door like it was Halloween.



Also I never knew that Benjamin Franklin tried to make the turkey the symbol of America.



It surprised me that the people back then made around 100 pies each household.

Article posted November 24, 2009 at 02:29 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 41



Article posted November 23, 2009 at 06:02 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 43

The people who celebrated thanksgiving, had very different ways of celebrating it. Some people have different things that they eat. Like most American families have turkey but some Jewish families had chicken soup and matzoh balls. Some families also had celery which had to be imported from other states. Thanksgiving was a very big holiday. Most people today think Christmas is but back then, they thought Thanksgiving was more important. In some houses, the more rich family had gas light and later had electric light.

Article posted November 23, 2009 at 06:02 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 43



Article posted November 24, 2009 at 02:22 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 50

One thing I learned about Thanksgiving is that it used to be focused on religion more than food and family. There was a meal, but it wasn't nearly as big as the standard now. People went to church and prayed for the things that they appreciated.



Another thing I learned was that Thanksgiving used to be on different days. At first, a Thanksgiving would be proclaimed after a major event ; for example, if a battle was won, offiials would proclaim a day of giving thanks. Soon, it became custom to have it in the fall, but there wasn't a set day. It also was not a national holiday. Hale from New Hampshire wanted Thanksgiving to be a national holiday. She wrote to five presidents but they all declined. Finally Abraham Lincoln agreed with Hale and Thanksgiving became a national holiday.



A third thing I learned was that the pilgrims are thought to have started the tradition of Thanksgiving when the had the feast with the Native Americans. It's true they had the feast, but we do not celebrate Thanksgiving because of that. We started celebrating it because it was a day to appreciate and pray. It was also established as a way to bring people together

Article posted November 24, 2009 at 02:22 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 50



Article posted November 23, 2009 at 06:06 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 46

What I learned at Strawbery Banke was how long it took to prepare a feast for about thirty five guests including relatives. Each woman from each family would prepare around 100 hundred pies for Thanksgiving, Christmas, and the rest of winter. It would take around a couple days for it to make. Some of the tools they used was the s hook for cooking vegetables, they also used s hooks that were closer to the fire to make the pot hotter and colder like on a stove.

Article posted November 23, 2009 at 06:06 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 46



Article posted December 3, 2009 at 07:06 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 43

Today we went to Strawbery Banke. Another example of my L.A. Project. But, it was really fun because the people pretended to be people from the 1900's. The people were really good at acting. I learned that you can use one bag to put more than one grain in it without having them mix, almost at all. I also learned that you couldn't buy spices in a store or anything, you had to make them, as in grind your own cinnamon. I got to grind cinnamon and it takes a really long time. They had many long tedious jobs that are very annoying, like for Thanksgiving they had to have a person turn the Thanksgiving turkey until it was done. I do now realize that if I had lived in this time then I would hate it, so now I am very grateful for the things that I have that help me everyday. It was really fun!!

Article posted December 3, 2009 at 07:06 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 43



Article posted November 23, 2009 at 05:58 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 45

I learned many things about Thanksgiving while I was at Strawbery Banke. I learned that Jewish people always have Chicken soup and Matzoh balls when there is a holiday. Also I learned that making and preserving food was very difficult because they didn't have freezers and refrigerators to preserve the food. Also they had to grind, measure and preserve their own food. It was very difficult to make their Thanksgiving Day feast because it took a lot of preparation. For example they had to turn the turkey on the spit for hours and measure and grind their ingredients and much more. Those are some interesting facts that I learned while at Strawbery Banke.

Article posted November 23, 2009 at 05:58 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 45



Article posted November 23, 2009 at 06:00 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 48

           Our trip to Strawbery Banke taught us a lot of interesting information about the history of thanksgiving throughout the ages and with many different cultures. The different cultures included Jewish people, celebrating with matzo balls, Israelis, who celebrated with a hut called a sukkah, and people from China who celebrate the moon festival. Thanksgiving has always required a lot of work to prepare food in all cultures, and even more back in the 1700's and 1800's. So no matter how it is celebrated, in which ever culture you do, thanksgiving has the same roots.

Article posted November 23, 2009 at 06:00 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 48



Article posted November 30, 2009 at 01:55 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 43

Thanksgiving 'americanizes' people by bringing immigrants together with Americans.



People in Germany celebrate Oktoberfest.



In Austria, children walk around with candles asking for treats.

Article posted November 30, 2009 at 01:55 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 43



Article posted November 23, 2009 at 06:15 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 44

I had a great time at Strawberry Banke and it was nice to learn some some new things and refresh up on some old things that I learned last time I was there. One thing that I thought was fun and interesting was when we went into a room and in front of us was a bag filled with two different sized corn husks and two strings. With all these things we made a doll which the girls would make and play with as a toy. Another thing that we learned on our field trip was some cooking chores that the girls would do. We even got to do some of those chores like we would make corn meal, weigh raisins, ground spices, and stringed beans . One more thing that we did was make a basket and fill it with all kinds of things because the people back then would do this and give it way to the poor so they would have food in the winter. In all we learned and had fun at Strawberry Banke.

Article posted November 23, 2009 at 06:15 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 44



Article posted November 24, 2009 at 02:43 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 56

Three things I learned about Thanksgiving



The first thing I learned was how to preserve foods first you can salt and dry them.



The second thing is that Abraham Lincoln declared Thanksgiving as a national holiday



the third thing is that the Irish women would be the servants in the good wen mansion



Article posted November 24, 2009 at 02:43 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 56



Article posted November 23, 2009 at 06:01 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 50

 



1 I learned that cod was considered a delicacy all around the world.






 



2 I learned that that people jam fruits to preserve them.






 



3 I learned that church used to be more important than the feast.



Article posted November 23, 2009 at 06:01 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 50



Article posted November 24, 2009 at 02:40 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 59

Strawbery Banke09 015 by RJH School.

Article posted November 24, 2009 at 02:40 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 59



Article posted November 30, 2009 at 02:47 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 42

3 Things I Learned at Strawbery Bank



How to make dolls out of corn husk and string: you first fold the biggest piece of corn husk the hamburger way, and tie it together in the middle so it looks like an hourglass. Do this to the other piece too, and stick the smaller one inside the bigger one and tie it together.

How to string beans: get a string and tie it to a pin. Then slide all of the string beans down it and hang it over the fire.

How they cooked a long time ago for Thanksgiving: string beans, mashed potatoes, turkey, e.t.c.

Article posted November 30, 2009 at 02:47 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 42



Article posted November 23, 2009 at 06:00 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 50







I learned a lot at Strawbery Banke. One thing that I learned was, that on Thanksgiving poor people would go to rich people's houses to beg for food. I also learned that the preparation for Thanksgiving is very time consuming, compared to how we do it now. They had to make everything from scratch. Also, for the big, rich families Thanksgiving meant that hundreds of pies would be made.





Article posted November 23, 2009 at 06:00 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 50



Article posted November 24, 2009 at 02:26 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 50

I learned that Thanksgiving is really old and there are different types of Thanksgivings.

I learned that it was called Harvest Fest in Europe.



People back during the Victorian times gave away gifts on Thanksgiving to children on the streets or invited them to dinner.

Article posted November 24, 2009 at 02:26 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 50



Article posted November 23, 2009 at 06:19 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 37

Today we went to Strawberry Banke. We saw Mrs. Shapiro. We went into that house. And we had a tour guide named Ann. Ann took us around. We saw the hearth. And they scraped cinnamon. And I stringed green beans. And I grabbed a couple of apples. Her husband was the governor. And the governer decided something about Thanksgiving. He said we should have Thanksgiving that day of the year. Flip is a drink with beer. And they like cinnamon. And they use sugar. And I grated cinnamon. And they moved the spoon around. I'm telling you, I'm just trying to think of something. This hasn't been a good blog so far. I'm saying that. 

Article posted November 23, 2009 at 06:19 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 37



Article posted November 23, 2009 at 05:58 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 50

The Thanksgiving field trip was very interesting. Somethings that I didn't know about Thanksgiving was that they made matzoh balls from a piece of bread that looked like cardboard. And it was very flat and it had a vertical line of dots to keep it from rising. I also learned that it was very hard to preserve food there were three ways of preserving it. They Put fruits on strings they put things like carrots and cucumbers in jars with vinegar and salt. And the last thing they did was salting things. I also learned that they used a clock jack to cook the turkey or chicken. The field trip to Strawbery Banke was very interesting.

Article posted November 23, 2009 at 05:58 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 50



Article posted December 3, 2009 at 06:23 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 43

During our field trip to Strawbery Banke, we were shown different exhibits that showed the evolution of Thanksgiving throughout the years.



In one exhibit there was an elderly woman, she was married to the Governor at the time. She lived in a large 3 story house, now historic of course. She had many children but many died from different things, such as disease. She later took on one of her grandchildren because her mother had died, she took care of him.



During the Thanksgiving time she would give food such as pies apples, flour, sugar and other ingredients to poor people because they didn’t have as much as they did. And it was a time of sharing and giving thanks for what they had. The children and maids would put the things into a pillowcase or bag and tie a knot to separate the items.

Article posted December 3, 2009 at 06:23 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 43



Article posted November 23, 2009 at 06:14 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 43

I was amazed how long it takes to make thanks giving dinner in the 1700's it takes all day to cook the turkey. It takes weeks to prepare for one meal



Also they had a day for begging . They put every thing in one bag using knots amazing.



People were very strict they had bad punishments and made kids do tons of chores and could not go into certain rooms. also they couldn't bring toys out of their rooms.

Article posted November 23, 2009 at 06:14 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 43



Article posted November 24, 2009 at 05:07 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 49

STRAWBERY BANKE



When we went to Strawbery Banke we learned about the history of Thanksgiving and where it came from. There are many different kinds of thanksgivings from many different cultures. They say it came from the pilgrims that came over from England, that settled in present Plymouth, Massachusetts. The first feast that the pilgrims were different from the modern Thanksgiving. The Thanksgiving we have now has changed a lot over the years. There are a lot of different recipes for thanksgiving. Certain foods change because of culture. We learned how to grind corn with flour for corn meal, some say it was used for toilet paper. We learned to store food for charity, you can put many different kinds of food one pillow case by twisting the ends and tying knots. The kids had to do a lot of chores, most of them had to do something to help with the food.

Article posted November 24, 2009 at 05:07 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 49



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