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RETSD Adult Education Program-

English Language Arts

This is a space for adult students of grade 10, 11 and 12 English Language Arts to communicate about what and how they are learning, both in and out of class.

by Jody Ferguson
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ELA Manitoba Curriculum Documents
Human Rights Watch
Canadian Letters and Images Project
The Virtual Museum of Canada
The Canadian Encyclopedia
Oprah.com - Text info about Night and Elie Wiesel
The Book Thief - author info., discussion questions, etc.
Henry Rollins Official Site - Check out everything this guy does!
The Weakerthans Homepage
Internet Research Skills Wiki - Developed by Christine Robinson
'Net Know-How - A great site for info on how to be a wise and responsible internet user!
Owl at Purdue MLA 2009 Writing Guide
Watch Free Documentary Films Online
Freedom Riders Documentary - info and clips
Daily Grammar
Englishgrammar.org
Grammar Tips
10 Tips for Effective Editing
Commonly Confused Words
Notes on The Book Thief (from author Markus Zusak
How Will We Love? Documentary (Grade 11)
Ted Talks - Stefana Broadbent: How the Internet enables intimacy (Grade 11)
The Truth According to Wikipedia Documentary (Grade 12)
Freerice.com
No Logo: Brands, Globalization and Resistance Documentary
Naomi Klein on The Hour with George Stroumboulopoulos (No Logo: Ten Years Later)
The Lottery (Shirley Jackson) video part 1
The Lottery (Shirley Jackson) video part 2
The Grammar Gang - yes, an interesting blog about grammar!
Owl at Purdue Writing Guide
Grade 12 - Analysis text example
Crowdsourcing the News - Paul Lewis (Ted.com) - Grade 11 Media Study
OWL at Purdue - Evaluating Sources
Sample Essay #1 - MLA Style
Sample Essay #2 - MLA Style
Manitobia - Manitoban History
Ted.com
Macleans Magazine
Intro to Pathos video - Using Emotion as a Tool in your Speaking and Writing
Purdue OWL: MLA Formatting - The Basics (YouTube)
Purdue OWL: MLA Formatting: List of Works Cited (YouTube)
In-text Citations, MLA Style (YouTube)
Paleface - Burn and Rob (Grade 12 - Censorship Jigsaw Groups)
Sept. 11th Pager Data
Flocabulary - 5 Things (Elements of a Short Story)
Rosa Parks Biography (English Upgrading)
Gr. 12 Analysis Sample (Video- Nystrom Hits Letang)

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Article posted January 7, 2013 at 10:44 PM GMT-6 • comment • Reads 7449

The academy is not paradise. But learning is a place where paradise can be created. The classroom with all its limitations remains a location of possibility. In that field of possibility we have the opportunity to labour for freedom, to demand of ourselves and our comrades, an openness of mind and heart that allows us to face reality even as we collectively imagine ways to move beyond boundaries, to transgress. This is education as the practice of freedom.  - bell hooks

Article posted January 7, 2013 at 10:44 PM GMT-6 • comment • Reads 7449



Article posted December 10, 2012 at 10:54 AM GMT-6 • comment (1) • Reads 109

David Foster Wallace on Life and Work



Adapted from a commencement speech given by David Foster Wallace to the 2005 graduating class at Kenyon College.



There are these two young fish swimming along, and they happen to meet an older fish swimming the other way, who nods at them and says, "Morning, boys, how's the water?" And the two young fish swim on for a bit, and then eventually one of them looks over at the other and goes, "What the hell is water?"



If at this moment, you're worried that I plan to present myself here as the wise old fish explaining what water is to you younger fish, please don't be. I am not the wise old fish. The immediate point of the fish story is that the most obvious, ubiquitous, important realities are often the ones that are the hardest to see and talk about. Stated as an English sentence, of course, this is just a banal platitude -- but the fact is that, in the day-to-day trenches of adult existence, banal platitudes can have life-or-death importance. That may sound like hyperbole, or abstract nonsense.



A huge percentage of the stuff that I tend to be automatically certain of is, it turns out, totally wrong and deluded. Here's one example of the utter wrongness of something I tend to be automatically sure of: Everything in my own immediate experience supports my deep belief that I am the absolute center of the universe, the realest, most vivid and important person in existence. We rarely talk about this sort of natural, basic self-centeredness, because it's so socially repulsive, but it's pretty much the same for all of us, deep down. It is our default-setting, hard-wired into our boards at birth. Think about it: There is no experience you've had that you were not at the absolute center of. The world as you experience it is right there in front of you, or behind you, to the left or right of you, on your TV, or your monitor, or whatever. Other people's thoughts and feelings have to be communicated to you somehow, but your own are so immediate, urgent, real -- you get the idea. But please don't worry that I'm getting ready to preach to you about compassion or other-directedness or the so-called "virtues." This is not a matter of virtue -- it's a matter of my choosing to do the work of somehow altering or getting free of my natural, hard-wired default-setting, which is to be deeply and literally self-centered, and to see and interpret everything through this lens of self.



People who can adjust their natural default-setting this way are often described as being "well adjusted," which I suggest to you is not an accidental term.



Given the triumphal academic setting here, an obvious question is how much of this work of adjusting our default-setting involves actual knowledge or intellect. This question gets tricky. Probably the most dangerous thing about college education, at least in my own case, is that it enables my tendency to over-intellectualize stuff, to get lost in abstract arguments inside my head instead of simply paying attention to what's going on right in front of me. Paying attention to what's going on inside me. As I'm sure you guys know by now, it is extremely difficult to stay alert and attentive instead of getting hypnotized by the constant monologue inside your own head. Twenty years after my own graduation, I have come gradually to understand that the liberal-arts cliché about "teaching you how to think" is actually shorthand for a much deeper, more serious idea: "Learning how to think" really means learning how to exercise some control over how and what you think. It means being conscious and aware enough to choose what you pay attention to and to choose how you construct meaning from experience. Because if you cannot exercise this kind of choice in adult life, you will be totally hosed. Think of the old cliché about "the mind being an excellent servant but a terrible master." This, like many clichés, so lame and unexciting on the surface, actually expresses a great and terrible truth. It is not the least bit coincidental that adults who commit suicide with firearms almost always shoot themselves in the head. And the truth is that most of these suicides are actually dead long before they pull the trigger. And I submit that this is what the real, no-bull- value of your liberal-arts education is supposed to be about: How to keep from going through your comfortable, prosperous, respectable adult life dead, unconscious, a slave to your head and to your natural default-setting of being uniquely, completely, imperially alone, day in and day out.



That may sound like hyperbole, or abstract nonsense. So let's get concrete. The plain fact is that you graduating seniors do not yet have any clue what "day in, day out" really means. There happen to be whole large parts of adult American life that nobody talks about in commencement speeches. One such part involves boredom, routine, and petty frustration. The parents and older folks here will know all too well what I'm talking about.



By way of example, let's say it's an average day, and you get up in the morning, go to your challenging job, and you work hard for nine or ten hours, and at the end of the day you're tired, and you're stressed out, and all you want is to go home and have a good supper and maybe unwind for a couple of hours and then hit the rack early because you have to get up the next day and do it all again. But then you remember there's no food at home -- you haven't had time to shop this week, because of your challenging job -- and so now after work you have to get in your car and drive to the supermarket. It's the end of the workday, and the traffic's very bad, so getting to the store takes way longer than it should, and when you finally get there the supermarket is very crowded, because of course it's the time of day when all the other people with jobs also try to squeeze in some grocery shopping, and the store's hideously, fluorescently lit, and infused with soul-killing Muzak or corporate pop, and it's pretty much the last place you want to be, but you can't just get in and quickly out: You have to wander all over the huge, overlit store's crowded aisles to find the stuff you want, and you have to maneuver your junky cart through all these other tired, hurried people with carts, and of course there are also the glacially slow old people and the spacey people and the ADHD kids who all block the aisle and you have to grit your teeth and try to be polite as you ask them to let you by, and eventually, finally, you get all your supper supplies, except now it turns out there aren't enough checkout lanes open even though it's the end-of-the-day-rush, so the checkout line is incredibly long, which is stupid and infuriating, but you can't take your fury out on the frantic lady working the register.



Anyway, you finally get to the checkout line's front, and pay for your food, and wait to get your check or card authenticated by a machine, and then get told to "Have a nice day" in a voice that is the absolute voice of death, and then you have to take your creepy flimsy plastic bags of groceries in your cart through the crowded, bumpy, littery parking lot, and try to load the bags in your car in such a way that everything doesn't fall out of the bags and roll around in the trunk on the way home, and then you have to drive all the way home through slow, heavy, SUV-intensive rush-hour traffic, etcetera, etcetera.



The point is that petty, frustrating crap like this is exactly where the work of choosing comes in. Because the traffic jams and crowded aisles and long checkout lines give me time to think, and if I don't make a conscious decision about how to think and what to pay attention to, I'm going to be pissed and miserable every time I have to food-shop, because my natural default-setting is the certainty that situations like this are really all about me, about my hungriness and my fatigue and my desire to just get home, and it's going to seem, for all the world, like everybody else is just in my way, and who are all these people in my way? And look at how repulsive most of them are and how stupid and cow-like and dead-eyed and nonhuman they seem here in the checkout line, or at how annoying and rude it is that people are talking loudly on cell phones in the middle of the line, and look at how deeply unfair this is: I've worked really hard all day and I'm starved and tired and I can't even get home to eat and unwind because of all these stupid g-d- people.



Or, of course, if I'm in a more socially conscious form of my default-setting, I can spend time in the end-of-the-day traffic jam being angry and disgusted at all the huge, stupid, lane-blocking SUV's and Hummers and V-12 pickup trucks burning their wasteful, selfish, forty-gallon tanks of gas, and I can dwell on the fact that the patriotic or religious bumper stickers always seem to be on the biggest, most disgustingly selfish vehicles driven by the ugliest, most inconsiderate and aggressive drivers, who are usually talking on cell phones as they cut people off in order to get just twenty stupid feet ahead in a traffic jam, and I can think about how our children's children will despise us for wasting all the future's fuel and probably screwing up the climate, and how spoiled and stupid and disgusting we all are, and how it all just sucks, and so on and so forth...



Look, if I choose to think this way, fine, lots of us do -- except that thinking this way tends to be so easy and automatic it doesn't have to be a choice. Thinking this way is my natural default-setting. It's the automatic, unconscious way that I experience the boring, frustrating, crowded parts of adult life when I'm operating on the automatic, unconscious belief that I am the center of the world and that my immediate needs and feelings are what should determine the world's priorities. The thing is that there are obviously different ways to think about these kinds of situations. In this traffic, all these vehicles stuck and idling in my way: It's not impossible that some of these people in SUV's have been in horrible auto accidents in the past and now find driving so traumatic that their therapist has all but ordered them to get a huge, heavy SUV so they can feel safe enough to drive; or that the Hummer that just cut me off is maybe being driven by a father whose little child is hurt or sick in the seat next to him, and he's trying to rush to the hospital, and he's in a way bigger, more legitimate hurry than I am -- it is actually I who am in his way. Or I can choose to force myself to consider the likelihood that everyone else in the supermarket's checkout line is just as bored and frustrated as I am, and that some of these people probably have much harder, more tedious or painful lives than I do, overall.



Again, please don't think that I'm giving you moral advice, or that I'm saying you're "supposed to" think this way, or that anyone expects you to just automatically do it, because it's hard, it takes will and mental effort, and if you're like me, some days you won't be able to do it, or you just flat-out won't want to. But most days, if you're aware enough to give yourself a choice, you can choose to look differently at this fat, dead-eyed, over-made-lady who just screamed at her little child in the checkout line -- maybe she's not usually like this; maybe she's been up three straight nights holding the hand of her husband who's dying of bone cancer, or maybe this very lady is the low-wage clerk at the Motor Vehicles Dept. who just yesterday helped your spouse resolve a nightmarish red-tape problem through some small act of bureaucratic kindness. Of course, none of this is likely, but it's also not impossible -- it just depends on what you want to consider. If you're automatically sure that you know what reality is and who and what is really important -- if you want to operate on your default-setting -- then you, like me, will not consider possibilities that aren't pointless and annoying. But if you've really learned how to think, how to pay attention, then you will know you have other options. It will actually be within your power to experience a crowded, loud, slow, consumer-hell-type situation as not only meaningful but sacred, on fire with the same force that lit the stars -- compassion, love, the sub-surface unity of all things. Not that that mystical stuff's necessarily true: The only thing that's capital-T True is that you get to decide how you're going to try to see it. You get to consciously decide what has meaning and what doesn't. You get to decide what to worship...



Because here's something else that's true. In the day-to-day trenches of adult life, there is actually no such thing as atheism. There is no such thing as not worshipping. Everybody worships. The only choice we get is what to worship. And an outstanding reason for choosing some sort of God or spiritual-type thing to worship -- be it J.C. or Allah, be it Yahweh or the Wiccan mother-goddess or the Four Noble Truths or some infrangible set of ethical principles -- is that pretty much anything else you worship will eat you alive. If you worship money and things -- if they are where you tap real meaning in life -- then you will never have enough. Never feel you have enough. It's the truth. Worship your own body and beauty and sexual allure and you will always feel ugly, and when time and age start showing, you will die a million deaths before they finally plant you. On one level, we all know this stuff already -- it's been codified as myths, proverbs, clichés, bromides, epigrams, parables: the skeleton of every great story. The trick is keeping the truth up-front in daily consciousness. Worship power -- you will feel weak and afraid, and you will need ever more power over others to keep the fear at bay. Worship your intellect, being seen as smart -- you will end up feeling stupid, a fraud, always on the verge of being found out. And so on.



Look, the insidious thing about these forms of worship is not that they're evil or sinful; it is that they are unconscious. They are default-settings. They're the kind of worship you just gradually slip into, day after day, getting more and more selective about what you see and how you measure value without ever being fully aware that that's what you're doing. And the world will not discourage you from operating on your default-settings, because the world of men and money and power hums along quite nicely on the fuel of fear and contempt and frustration and craving and the worship of self. Our own present culture has harnessed these forces in ways that have yielded extraordinary wealth and comfort and personal freedom. The freedom to be lords of our own tiny skull-sized kingdoms, alone at the center of all creation. This kind of freedom has much to recommend it. But of course there are all different kinds of freedom, and the kind that is most precious you will not hear much talked about in the great outside world of winning and achieving and displaying. The really important kind of freedom involves attention, and awareness, and discipline, and effort, and being able truly to care about other people and to sacrifice for them, over and over, in myriad petty little unsexy ways, every day. That is real freedom. The alternative is unconsciousness, the default-setting, the "rat race" -- the constant gnawing sense of having had and lost some infinite thing.



I know that this stuff probably doesn't sound fun and breezy or grandly inspirational. What it is, so far as I can see, is the truth with a whole lot of rhetorical bullshit pared away. Obviously, you can think of it whatever you wish. But please don't dismiss it as some finger-wagging Dr. Laura sermon. None of this is about morality, or religion, or dogma, or big fancy questions of life after death. The capital-T Truth is about life before death. It is about making it to 30, or maybe 50, without wanting to shoot yourself in the head. It is about simple awareness -- awareness of what is so real and essential, so hidden in plain sight all around us, that we have to keep reminding ourselves, over and over: "This is water, this is water."



It is unimaginably hard to do this, to stay conscious and alive, day in and day out.



 

Article posted December 10, 2012 at 10:54 AM GMT-6 • comment (1) • Reads 109



Article posted November 28, 2012 at 04:17 PM GMT-6 • comment • Reads 64

English 20F/30S:



Here is the link to follow if you need to review the full version of Freedom Riders. Here you will also find additional information about the Freedom Rides (i.e. timelines, definitions, background, etc.)



http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/freedomriders/





For my grade 12 students, I've included the trailer to the film below. If you enjoy documentaries or are interested in the American civil rights movement of the 60's or human rights in general, you might find it interesting.



Watch Freedom Riders Theatrical Trailer on PBS. See more from American Experience.

Article posted November 28, 2012 at 04:17 PM GMT-6 • comment • Reads 64



Article posted November 20, 2012 at 08:58 AM GMT-6 • comment • Reads 74

Blog Assessment Information for 40S Transcona (and others that would like a refresher...)



There are three general areas that I consider while marking your blog assignments:



·         Meaningful and Relevant Blogging                                        /4



·         Explaining and Supporting your Ideas in Blogs                      /4



·         Meaningful and Respectful Blog Interaction                         /4



You will be given progress reports throughout the semester with ‘to date’ blog marks, in order to track your personal progress in each of these areas.  At the end of the semester, upon review of your entire blog, I will assign final marks in these areas, worth 20% of your final mark.



The following ‘big questions’ guide me in assessing your blogs.  Please consider them when completing your blog assignments:



Are you addressing the questions asked of you?



Are you making meaningful, thoughtful and authentic blog entries?



Are you supporting your ideas with specific evidence and/or logical reasons?



Are your ideas clear and fully explained with consideration of your audience?



When asked, are you able to meaningfully reflect on your assignments and identify areas for improvement?



Are you making meaningful, thoughtful and authentic comments on other people’s blogs?



Are you being respectful when discussing others’ ideas in your blog and when commenting on others’ blogs, even when you disagree with their ideas?



Is there evidence in your blogs, comments and discussion that you are seeking out and using others’ ideas to develop your own ideas?



Are you publishing thought-provoking ‘choice blogs’?



Do your ‘choice blogs’ represent well thought out and insightful ideas and opinions?



In order to fully meet these expectations, each blog should be no less than one full paragraph.  'No less than' = that is the absolute minimum you should be doing, otherwise you are likely not explaining your ideas in full!



Note:  Your blogs are not assessed for technical aspects (such as spelling, punctuation, grammar, etc.) however, you are encouraged to present your best writing, as your blog will be published for others to read.



 

Article posted November 20, 2012 at 08:58 AM GMT-6 • comment • Reads 74



Article posted November 15, 2012 at 12:08 AM GMT-6 • comment • Reads 98

As my 40S class at McLeod is currently working through their study of song lyrics, I figured I would post the lyrics to one of my favourite songs by one of my favourite bands.  This is a song that I would probably never cover in class (due to complexity, time constraints, contraversial content, etc.), but I figured I would post it here for those interested in a challenge.  The band is Propagandhi and the song is from the album Supporting Caste.  Enjoy!



Dear Coach’s Corner



Dear Ron MacLean. Dear Coach’s Corner. I’m writing in order for someone to explain to my niece the distinction between these mandatory pre-game group rites of submission and the rallies at Nuremburg. Specifically the function the ritual serves in conjunction with what everybody knows is in the end a kid’s game. I’m just appealing to your sense of fair play when I say she’s puzzled by the incessant pressure for her to not defy the collective will, and yellow ribboned lapels, as the soldiers inexplicably rappel down from the arena rafters (which, if not so insane, would be grounds for screaming laughter). Dear Ron MacLean, I wouldn’t bother with these questions if I didn’t sense some spiritual connection. We may not be the same but it’s not like we’re from different planets: we both love this game so much we can hardly fucking stand it. Alberta-born and prairie-raised. Seems like there ain’t a sheet of ice north of Fargo I ain’t played. From Penhold to the Gatineau, every fond memory of childhood that I know is somehow connected to the culture of this game. I can’t just let it go. But I guess it comes down to what kind of world you want to live in, and if diversity is disagreement, and disagreement is treason, well don’t be surprised if we find ourselves reaping a strange and bitter fruit that sad old man beside you keeps feeding to young minds as virtue. It takes a village to raise a child but just a flag to raze the children until they’re nothing more than ballast for fulfilling a madman’s dream of a paradise where complexity is reduced to black and white. How do I protect her from this cult of death?

Article posted November 15, 2012 at 12:08 AM GMT-6 • comment • Reads 98



Article posted November 8, 2012 at 11:27 AM GMT-6 • comment • Reads 110

I sit here in a nearly empty classroom, waiting for the my last few 40S Transcona students to finish exams, drop off last minute assignments, and publish their final blogs, knowing I should be working, but not really wanting to.  Something about that looming deadline slows me down, though I know I'll regret spending my time writing this when I'm sitting in a quiet house at 3:30 am trying to focus my eyes on research essays and exam responses.  Right now, all I seem to be able to focus on is how I haven't put anything on my blog in nearly a month.  Every time I open this page, that counter taunts me.  At first glance, it seems that this blog is quite popular, with over 1800 reads (presumably by students), though in reality it is more likely a total of 18 students who have been on this page 100 times each to complete blogs and comments, that have repeatedly endured the distorted image of the speaker's face below.  Really, Ted?  You couldn't have frozen the video on a more flattering still of the poor guy?  Yes, this may be a frivolous waste of my precious time, but I can't move on with my morning until I reset that counter to zero.  Irrational? Obsessive? Procrastinating? Maybe so... but I can take solace in the fact that I know I will get it all done.  I always do.  Obstinate dedication eventually beats out procrastination.



 



 



I touch my name-tag, should say, "HELLO, I'M too tired to smile today."  - From the song Relative Surplus Value, by The Weakerthans



 





 

Article posted November 8, 2012 at 11:27 AM GMT-6 • comment • Reads 110



Article posted October 11, 2012 at 04:59 PM GMT-6 • comment • Reads 61

"Our lives are the sum of our memories." - Joshua Foer







Article posted October 11, 2012 at 04:59 PM GMT-6 • comment • Reads 61



Article posted October 2, 2012 at 10:13 PM GMT-6 • comment • Reads 94



Article posted October 2, 2012 at 10:13 PM GMT-6 • comment • Reads 94



Article posted September 12, 2012 at 11:11 AM GMT-6 • comment • Reads 83

As blogs are worth 20% of your final grade, it is important for you to know and understand exactly how I am assessing them. 



There are three general areas that I consider while marking your blogs:





  • Meaningful and Relevant Blogging   /4


  • Explaining and Supporting your Ideas in Blogs    /4


  • Meaningful and Respectful Blog Interaction   /4




You will be given progress reports throughout the semester with ‘to date’ blog marks, in order to track your personal progress in each of these areas. At the end of the semester, upon review of your entire blog, I will assign final marks in these areas (this is where the 20% of your final mark comes from).



I assess the blogs based on the curricular outcomes at each grade level (therefore, I have slightly different expectations of a grade 10 blog than a grade 12 blog).  Having said that, the following ‘big questions’ guide me in assessing all blogs. Please consider them when completing your blog assignments:



Are you addressing the questions asked of you?


Are you making meaningful, thoughtful and authentic blog entries?



Are you supporting your ideas with specific evidence and/or logical reasons?



Are your ideas clear and fully explained with consideration of your audience?



When asked, are you able to meaningfully reflect on your assignments and identify areas for improvement?



Are you making meaningful, thoughtful and authentic comments on other people’s blogs?



Are you being respectful when discussing others’ ideas in your blog and when commenting on others’ blogs, even when you disagree with their ideas?



Is there evidence in your blogs, comments and discussion that you are seeking out and using others’ ideas to develop your own ideas?



Note: Your blogs are not assessed for technical aspects (such as spelling, punctuation, grammar, etc.) however, you are encouraged to present your best writing, as your blog will be published for others to read.

Article posted September 12, 2012 at 11:11 AM GMT-6 • comment • Reads 83



Article posted September 9, 2012 at 09:48 PM GMT-6 • comment • Reads 109

Welcome new students! This is the class blog. All student blogs can be accessed through this page. Additionally, I will post important and/or interesting information on this page periodically. Please check back often! I am simply continuing with the same blog that I have had for a while now, so be aware that anything prior to this post does not apply directly to you, though you are welcome to read it if you are interested.





The class blog is a valuable tool that allows you to:





  • Process, reflect on and assess your own learning




  • Share your learning with others in your class (including myself)




  • See where your classmates are in their learning process




  • Communicate with others about learning (using comments)




You will complete one blog each week (two per week if you are in the condensed 40S class) and make at least one meaningful comment on another person's entry with every second blog. You will be assessed on your ability to communicate your ideas and learning clearly, effectively and respectfully, based on the curriculum outcomes at your grade level. Your blog will not be assessed for proper spelling, grammar, etc. but you are encouraged to present your best writing, as this blog will be published for others to read. We will discuss blog assessment in more detail within the next few classes.

Article posted September 9, 2012 at 09:48 PM GMT-6 • comment • Reads 109



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My Classes & Students

English 40S McLeod
English 40S Transcona (condensed Nov. - Jan.)
English Upgrading

About the Blogger

My name is Jody Ferguson. I am 32 years old. I am married and have two children - Alexis (13) and Aiden (7). I am a very busy hockey/drama/Girl Guides/roller derby mom who also loves good music, tattoos and Coca-Cola. I teach English Language Arts at both the Mcleod Adult Learning Centre and the Transcona Adult Learning Centre. I love my job! jferguson@retsd.mb.ca

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