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Sixth grade Science students blogging from the Pacific Northwest in Chimacum, WA!
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teacher: Alfonso Gonzalez

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Article posted September 11, 2012 at 05:05 PM GMT • comment • Reads 138

This is my first post since 6th grade. Now I am in 8th and I am just getting used to it again... so, HI!!

Article posted September 11, 2012 at 05:05 PM GMT • comment • Reads 138



Article posted June 5, 2012 at 05:23 PM GMT • comment • Reads 39

Random facts about Madagascar Hissing Cockroaches:



Their scientific name is Gromphadorhina portentosa

They live mainly in Madagascar

Males have large horns which they use to ram other males

Their hissing sound is part of their mating ritual and also serves as an effective warning call

They make their sound from exhaling through breathing holes instead of using vibrating membranes like most insects

Contrary to common belief, Madagascar Hissing Cockroaches are not pests and don't live in dwellings where people live. They actually live on the forest floor!

Cockroaches are somewhat active during the day, but are the most active during the night.

Article posted June 5, 2012 at 05:23 PM GMT • comment • Reads 39



Article posted May 10, 2012 at 05:50 PM GMT • comment • Reads 46

      This week my class has been doing snail experiments (see previous blog 'Snail Experiments'). My conclusion for that experiment was that extended exposure to light (or lack of) does not affect the snails preference over lighter or darker colors. I think this because when we tested the snails, after being exposed to constant light for 20 minutes they chose light colored paper, plus after being in total darkness for 20 minutes, they still chose the lighter colored paper. An inaccuracy that may have happened is that the blacked out box that we put the snails in may have not been completely black and there may have been a few spots where light was able to get through.   

Article posted May 10, 2012 at 05:50 PM GMT • comment • Reads 46



Article posted May 4, 2012 at 05:02 PM GMT • comment • Reads 38

This week my group is doing experiments with snails! Our plan is to test whether a snail prefers light or dark colors, and if a snails exposure to constant light or no light will change it's preference. Immediately after retrieveing two snails from the fishbowl (where all the snails are living), we will have the snails in front of black and white colored paper with a small piece of lettuce on each paper. Then, after doing three trials per snail, we will record the results of which snail preferred which color. Then, my group and I will put the snails in a blacked out box for the night, then try the experiment the next day!

Article posted May 4, 2012 at 05:02 PM GMT • comment • Reads 38



Article posted May 1, 2012 at 05:12 PM GMT • comment • Reads 56

What I know about snails:

1. They leave a slime trail!

2. They have one foot!

3. They have a shell!

4. They're basicly a pretty slug!



What I want to know:

1. A snake slithers, a horse gallops, so what's the word for the movement that a slug makes?

2. Can a slug smell?

3. Can a slug hear?

4. Can a slug taste?

5. What does a snail eat?

Article posted May 1, 2012 at 05:12 PM GMT • comment • Reads 56



Article posted April 17, 2012 at 04:54 PM GMT • comment • Reads 40

 For the past few weeks my group and I have been working on growng rye grass! The experiment consisted of putting rye grass seeds in a compost-sand mix and watering it every week with either warm water, cold water, salt water and sugar water, then drawing the results out on a poster. We expected the sugar-watered seeds to grow better than normal, the salt-watered seeds to not grow at all or to ever-so-slowly grow, the cold water to grow normally, and the warm water to absolutely kill the seeds and all possible growth. 



       At the end of the two week experiment, the results were something we never expected! The salt water AND sugar water had both caused no growth, whereas the plants watered with warm and cold water had plenty of growth! My group and I figured out that the salt water had destroyed the plants because when salt dissolves in water, it separates into sodium and bicarbonate. When the salt water was given to the plant, the sodium took away the nutrients in the soil, while the bicarbonate messed with the plant's ability to photosynthesize and absorb nutrients from the soil. We had also figured out why sugar water negatively affected the rye grass! In a normal plant-soil relationship, the osmotic pressure of the soil is higher than the plant's inner osmotic pressure, so when water is absorbed into the soil, the plant draws it up. However, sugar lowers the osmotic potential of the soil, so when sugar is regularly put into the soil, the osmotic pressure is lowered significantly to the point where the soil's pressure is so low that no matter how much you water it, the plant will still not be able to draw water from the soil, no matter how much you water it!



 





King, Tom. "Does Sugar Affect Plant Growth?" EHow. Demand Media, 10 Mar. 2011. Web. 04 May 2012. <[LINK]>.



Hill, Patricia. "What Effect Does Salt Water Have on Plants?" EHow. Demand Media, 30 Apr. 2009. Web. 04 May 2012. <[LINK]>.



Article posted April 17, 2012 at 04:54 PM GMT • comment • Reads 40



Article posted March 2, 2012 at 05:40 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 51

In science we were asked to answer this question and post it on our blog.

"Explain why offspring that result from sexual reproduction are likely to have more diverse characteristics than offspring that result from asexual reproduction."



My answer was:

"Offspring from sexual reproduction have more diverse characteristics because its a combination of two different pools of genetics, whereas asexual reproduction is from only one pool of genetics and characteristics."

Article posted March 2, 2012 at 05:40 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 51



Article posted February 27, 2012 at 06:08 PM GMT • comment • Reads 66

In science we have been studying genetics by using punnett squares.







By using genetics, everyone in my class made a baby! My baby ended up having light eyes and hair and attached earlobes!



Article posted February 27, 2012 at 06:08 PM GMT • comment • Reads 66



Article posted February 6, 2012 at 05:56 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 49

During the past few days, my group has been doing an experiment about bacteria in our school! We went around and swabbed four random spots in our school (my team did the toilet seat, the water fountain, the iPad screen, and the lunch room door handle) with wet Q-tips. We then rubbed the Q-tips in their correct quadrant of the petri dish, then incubated them- to grow the bacteria- then made observations at 24 hours and 48 hours. The results were astounding.

The question I had going into this experiment was 'What part of our school has the most bacteria?'. After growing the bacteria for 48 hours, the answer was the water fountain! That section of the dish was covered in bacteria. It was soo gross! I'm definitely never using that fountain again! An inaccuracy that could have happened was while we transported the Q-tip, we could've had bacteria from the air float on to it and contaminate the sample. The close second was the toilet seat, the third with the lunchroom door handle, and the place with the least bacteria was the iPad! Some questions I had after this experiment was why the iPad was less dirty than the door handle because the iPad is never cleaned and the handle is supposed to be cleaned everyday!

Article posted February 6, 2012 at 05:56 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 49



Article posted January 26, 2012 at 05:45 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 52

Although meiosis and mitosis kind of sound the same they have various differences, but they also have a few similarities. They both create more cells, but meiosis creates four cells, as opposed to the two that mitosis creates. They both also pass on DNA to cells they create, but the cells created by mitosis have the same exact DNA, while the cells created by meiosis all have different DNA.

Article posted January 26, 2012 at 05:45 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 52



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