Login
Copyright (c) 2014 by Conditions of Use    Privacy Policy Return to Blogmeister
-- Blogmeister

sarah's blog!!-


We have three 6th grade Science classes and two 8th grade Science classes blogging here from the Pacific Northwest in Chimacum, WA! Sixth graders are learning a bit about Mt Saint Helens, environmental science through fresh water ecology, and physical science this year. Eighth graders are learning about life science this year. Please join us as we learn Science by exploring our world.
Mr. G's Blog
Mr. G's Class Facebook Page


by teacher: Alfonso Gonzalez
Blog Entries

Article posted June 8, 2011 at 09:00 PM GMT • comment • Reads 280

We experimented with and observed Madagascar hissing cockroaches this week! These cockroaches live under leaves and wood, and eat mostly fruit. They have powerful chewing mouths.

The type of experiments we did were simple and did not harm the cockroach. We blew on it, observed it eating, and dropped ammonia near it. Some of their (the cockroach's) reactions were expected, others were really suprising.

For example, when we blew on the cockroach, it moved away, which we expected. But when we dropped ammonia in front of it, the cockroach reared up and almost ran off the table.

We also discussed their body structures, like their legs and heads. The legs have rear facing spines. When you to grab ahold of the roach, it can slide it's legs forward without any resistance, and use the spines to slip out of your fingers. This is one example of how insects (and any other living thing) can evolve adaptations to help them survive.

Article posted June 8, 2011 at 09:00 PM GMT • comment • Reads 280



Article posted May 6, 2011 at 09:04 PM GMT • comment • Reads 47

Article posted May 6, 2011 at 09:04 PM GMT • comment • Reads 47



Article posted May 2, 2011 at 09:15 PM GMT • comment • Reads 47

We did a Socratic circle discussion on an article. That article was about slime mold. It claimed that the yellow pigment in "Dog vomit" slime mold is zinc and cadmium resistant. That means that it could be used against zinc poisoning!! It's interesting that something that looks like vomit could be so useful. It also means that slime mold could help reclaim zinc poisoned soil.

Article posted May 2, 2011 at 09:15 PM GMT • comment • Reads 47



Article posted April 21, 2011 at 09:11 PM GMT • comment (3) • Reads 41

We recently did an experiment with snails. My group decided to test a snails eyesight. We set a snail at a tape starting point, placed a carrot chunk at a controlled interval, and did three trials per interval, per snail. The distance intervals were 0cm, 2cm, 4cm, and so on up to 10cm. We tested three snails on whether they went to the carrot or not. We thought that the snails would lose track of the carrot at about 6 or 7 cm.



Out of a total of nine trials over three snails, here are our results!

0cm-- 100%

2cm-- 78%

4cm-- 67%

6cm-- 44%

8cm-- 22%

10cm-- 22%



This data supports the conclusion that snails can see up to 10cm away but...



Our research later revealed that most tests confirm that snails don't see like we do. They see only light and dark. We think that the snails may have used their sense of smell to find and eat the carrot, but we haven't found any evidence saying how well snails can smell. Apparently people haven't done much research on this....

Article posted April 21, 2011 at 09:11 PM GMT • comment (3) • Reads 41



Article posted April 13, 2011 at 08:50 PM GMT • comment • Reads 46

So... last week in science class, we started investigating plants. But instead of teaching it using normal methods, Mr. G decided to let us present what we found in our research in a science fair sort of setting.



My team researched plants in different soil types. That's also what our lab was about. We found that Plants need Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Potassium to function normally. We also learned that sunflowers are hardy plants and that barrel cactus's like slightly moist soil. Another topic of research was about wilting and over-watering plants.



In our lab, we planted radishes in 6 different soils: gravel, beach sand, long jump sand, loam, mud, and random dirt. The radishes grew best in the sands an the loam. They ended up drowning in the soils with poor drainage-- gavel, mud, and dirt.



I really liked the way our project went, and I think it was good to have kids learn from other kids. Everything went really well with our experiment and project. This is definitely a project to have next year's class do!!

Article posted April 13, 2011 at 08:50 PM GMT • comment • Reads 46



Article posted February 28, 2011 at 09:19 PM GMT • comment • Reads 95

In our bacteria lab, we swabbed four places. My team swabbed the bathroom, a keyboard, an iPad and the water fountain. I predicted that the toilet or the keyboard would grow the most bacteria.



Our first attempt at growing bacteria didn't go very well. For one thing, the incubator was nine degrees higher than it said! Also, we used a regular agar, instead of a nutrient one.



My hypothesis was partially correct. We grew the most bacteria in the bathroom. The one with the second most bacteria was the water fountain. The one that grew the biggest bacteria colony was the keyboard. One thing I would do differently is swab more thouroughly, to get more bacteria on our dish.

Article posted February 28, 2011 at 09:19 PM GMT • comment • Reads 95



Article posted February 10, 2011 at 09:17 PM GMT • comment • Reads 141

Why does foam form on rivers? Plants and other organic materials that live in rivers produce organic compounds. Some of these are surface active agents, and like soap they lessen the surface tension of the water. Less surface tension allows air bubbles to stay without popping on the surface of the water, creating foam.

Article posted February 10, 2011 at 09:17 PM GMT • comment • Reads 141



Article posted January 25, 2011 at 09:18 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 56

The wood in a tree is made when lignin and cellulose bind together to make a hard substance called wood.



"Lignin-- A complex polymer; the chief constituent of wood other than carbohydrates; binds to cellulose fibers to harden and strengthen cell walls of plants."



http://www.audioenglish.net/dictionary/lignin.htm





"The basic unit of cellulose--the tough, fibrous organic compound that gives structure and tensile strength to wood and plant fibers like cotton--is the simple sugar, glucose."



http://www.ehow.com/about_4676442_what-basic-unit-cellulose.html





"There are six carbon atoms in a glucose molecule. They can be in the form of a linear chain, or the chain can be connected to itself to make a ring.

Attached to the carbon atoms are 12 hydrogen atoms.

Also attached to the carbon atoms are six oxygen atoms. The oxygen and hydrogen atoms can be attached to one another as well as to the carbon atoms."



http://www.ehow.com/facts_4926535_what-glucose-made.html



"Minerals from the soil help build the solid material in plant roots, stems, and leaves. Carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen from the air and water make up over 90% of most plants."



http://www.globio.org/glossopedia/article.aspx?art_id=30





My conclusion: Essentially, trees are made up of Hydrogen, Carbon, and Oxygen, which are absorbed/taken from the air and water.



Note:



Glucose is made up of 12 hydrogen, 6 carbon, and 6 oxygen. Out of Hydrogen, Carbon, and Oxygen, Oxygens atomic weight is the heaviest. Even though there are 12 hydrogen atoms, hydrogen is so light, it weighs less than 6 carbon atoms. 6 carbon atoms, in turn, are lighter than 6 oxygen atoms. At first, it might sound like the tree would be mostly made of oxygen, but at night some of the oxygen is released, and the carbon dioxide is made into the woody fiber in trees.

Article posted January 25, 2011 at 09:18 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 56



Article posted January 10, 2011 at 08:54 PM GMT • comment • Reads 120

Animal and plant cells are mostly the same. They have most of the same parts, like rough endoplasmic reticulum, lysosomes, and peroxisomes. Centriole, centrosome, and micro tubules are all similarities between plant and animal cells. However, animal cells are more blobbish (usually round), whereas plant cells are typically square. Plant cells also have something that animal cells don't- chloroplast. Chloroplast allows plants to photosynthesize, and make food. Animals have to eat food to get energy, so their cells don't have chloroplast.





 



Article posted January 10, 2011 at 08:54 PM GMT • comment • Reads 120



Article posted November 16, 2010 at 09:00 PM GMT • comment (2) • Reads 92

Me and my group started a lab involving polyacrylate crystals and salt. Polyacrylate crystals look like plastic beads, and they absorb water. We put the crystals into water with varying levels of salt and measured their diameters.



CONCLUSION:

When I observed the effects of varying levels of salt on polyacrylate crystals, I found that my hypothesis was correct. As the levels of salt increases, the size of the polyacrylate crystals decreased. For example, after ten minutes, the crystals with no salt averaged 5.5mm, and the crystals with one minispoon averaged 5mm. After 24 hours, they averaged 14.5mm and 11.5mm respectively. I believe that the crystals were smaller in salt water because polyacrylate crystals only absorb water. That means that the salt was forced to dissolve into the remaining water. Since water can only dissolve so much salt before the salt becomes solid again, the polyacrylate crystals couldn't absorb any more water. I would not make any changes in our lab, because I think it went well and we got great data. For a different experiment, we could see how fast the polyacrylate crystals would disintegrate depending on the amount of salt in the water.





Article posted November 16, 2010 at 09:00 PM GMT • comment (2) • Reads 92



Article posted October 26, 2010 at 09:21 PM GMT • comment • Reads 68

This week, we put different substances in liquids. We grew brine shrimp in salt water, and radish seeds in water. But our question is: are brine shrimp eggs and seeds alive BEFORE they are out into water? I believe that they aren't activated yet- like a hibernating bear. When they are put into water, they are activated. When they aren't in the water, they are still alive.

Article posted October 26, 2010 at 09:21 PM GMT • comment • Reads 68



Article posted October 20, 2010 at 09:19 PM GMT • comment • Reads 49

Each of our teams were assigned a mystery liquid. We were assigned liquid one. We put our liquid into 5 vials, and put different substances into each vial. Substance A looks like red sand. Substance B looks like little pellets of yeast. C looks like red beads, and we think substance D is seeds. E looks like insect eggs. After each of the substances was in the liquid for 24 hours, we recorded changes. A resembled a wet lump of sand. B turned into a swirly mixture, and when stirred, looks unnervingly like backwash. C grew into slightly bigger round jelly like balls. D had no change. E has no change.



After we record the next set of changes, we will attempt to catergorize each of the substances into living and nonliving.

Article posted October 20, 2010 at 09:19 PM GMT • comment • Reads 49



Article posted October 15, 2010 at 09:20 PM GMT • comment • Reads 49

In our class, we've been discussing what attributes an object must have to make it "alive". So far, we've decided on these qualities:



-It can move or grow on it's own



-It has an exchange of gases (breathing)



-It needs food or energy (also water)



-It is able to reproduce



-It's made up of cells



-It is able to die



 



We also decided that if something has some of the qualities of life but not ALL of them, it is not alive.

Article posted October 15, 2010 at 09:20 PM GMT • comment • Reads 49



Article posted October 11, 2010 at 02:17 AM GMT • comment (2) • Reads 41

Ok this is really gross…. So one lovely afternoon, I find the prey of my cat outside my front door: a chipmunk. Previously, we found a chipmunk in our yard, and it had a small abscess on its leg.  We took it to the Center Valley Animal Rescue Center, and we were told that the lump was a botfly egg growing in its leg. OUCH. Sure enough, there was a huge brownish lump on the dead chipmunks’ leg. It wiggled. I almost barfed. So… we had to go somewhere and when we got back a couple hours later, it had crawled out of the chipmunk and was underneath it. It currently resides in a Tupperware container on my desk.

Article posted October 11, 2010 at 02:17 AM GMT • comment (2) • Reads 41



Article posted September 28, 2010 at 11:59 PM GMT • comment (2) • Reads 44

On September 24th, my family and I woke up at 3:30 AM to look through our spotting scope. We saw Jupiter- and saw four of its moons! Yes, that’s right; Jupiter has more than one moon. In fact, it has 63! And you can still see them. To the naked eye, Jupiter appears three times brighter than any star in the sky. With a telescope or spotting scope, you can make out several moons. So wake up at 3:30 in the morning…. And you might see Jupiter.

Article posted September 28, 2010 at 11:59 PM GMT • comment (2) • Reads 44



Article posted September 21, 2010 at 09:22 PM GMT • comment (2) • Reads 56

I'm sure most everyone has heard about the oil spill by now. Located in the Gulf of Mexico, the spill was caused by a rising bubble of methane gas. The rig exploded, pumping millions of gallons of oil into the ocean. Because the well was 18,000 feet underwater, it took until September to completely stop the leak.  http://www.cnbc.com/id/37593652/17_ways_to_clean_up_the_gulf_oil_spill? is a website with a slide show listing 17 ways to clean up the oil spill. I'll list a few here.



This is a picture of controlled burns.This picture is of


Controlled burns - oil is burned off the surface of the water.






Booms and Skimmers - booms collect the oil into one place and skimmers separate it from the water.



This picture is of


Hair Mats - human hair is collected and made into mats. the hair soaks up oil, so it's useful in an oil spill.



Bees Wax - bacteria in the bees wax eats the hydrocarbons in most crude oils.



Nuclear option - it has been considered before to use nuclear bombs to seal oil wells under water. This sounds pretty risky to me!



Many animals have been devastated by the oil spill. Lots of fish, birds, dolphins, and other mammals have died.



Oiled pelicans are getting ready to be cleaned in this picture.

Article posted September 21, 2010 at 09:22 PM GMT • comment (2) • Reads 56



Article posted May 20, 2010 at 05:24 PM GMT • comment • Reads 51

What are lunar eclipses? Lunar eclipses happen when the Moon passes through a portion of the Earth's shadow. When the Earth is between the Sun and the Moon it has two shadows. The inner and darker one is called the Umbral shadow. The outer and lighter shadow is called the Penumbral Shadow.



Three basic lunar eclipses are:



1) Penumbral Eclipses



      The Moon passes through Earth's Penumbral shadow.



      These events are of only academic interest because hey are subtle and hard to observe.



2) Partial Lunar Eclipse



      A portion of the Moon passes through the Earth's Umbral shadow.



      These events are easy to see, even with the unaided eye.



3) Total Lunar Eclipse



      The entire Moon passes through the Earth's Umbral shadow.



      These events are really easy to see because of the Moon's bright red or orange color during the total phase (totalty).








You can look up the next lunar eclipse on the internet.

Article posted May 20, 2010 at 05:24 PM GMT • comment • Reads 51



Article posted March 26, 2010 at 04:59 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 44

We learned that there are two types of major earthquake waves: P and S. P waves travel faster than S waves, and travel through water, when S waves don't. the s waves look more like actual waves, when  waves stretch the land out. There are also foreshocks, and they are smaller and come before the main waves. When these waves reach the surface, they become surface waves (obviously). There are two main types of surface waves, too. The L (love) and R (rayleigh) waves. The reason scientists know that the outer core is liquid, is because S waves don't go through liquid, so when really sensitive seisomograms at the other end of the earth pick up the waves, they get the P waves, but not the S waves.

Article posted March 26, 2010 at 04:59 PM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 44



Article posted February 24, 2010 at 11:39 PM GMT • comment (2) • Reads 90

Right to the point: plate techtonics. The Earths crust is divided into two categories. Those are continental crust(continents) and oceanic crust(ocean floor). There are eleven main plates. They are: North American, South American, Pacific, Cocos, Nasca, Caribbean, African, Eurasian, Indo-Australian, Arabian, and the Arctic plate. A VEEEEEEEEEEEEEERY long time ago, the worlds land masses were all fused together, all along the southern side of the planet(where Antarctica is now). That land mass is called Gondwana. Over millions of years, the plates have moved a very long way, first to the land mass Pangea(where the continents were gathered together in the center of the map) and then on to the world as we see it now. There are three main types of plate boundary. They are: Convergent boundary(where two plates are crashing together), the Divergent boundary(when two plates move away from each other) and the Transform boundary(when two plates grind against each other opposite directions. There is also the Diffuse boundary, where there is no scientific data to prove that there is a Plate Boundary even there. Mysterious, huh? Our class previously learned about heat transfer (see my other blog) and the three types of heat energy transfer. Well, come to find out that that all ties in with the whole plate techtonics thing. In the mantle ( the thick layer of magma between the crust and outer core), there is much convection going on. When a plate is pushed beneath another plate(this is called subduction) in a convergent boundary, the plate partially melts and separates from the rest of the plate. The cooler new magma sinks to the center of the mantle and is re-heated. It is then recycled and pushed back to the top where it solidifies and becomes a new plate. If you go to Mr. G's Moodle you can find a link to several good websites about plate techtonics.

Article posted February 24, 2010 at 11:39 PM GMT • comment (2) • Reads 90



Article posted February 9, 2010 at 02:11 AM GMT • comment • Reads 53

You may be thinking "WHAT??" but I asure you that isostasy is really a simple concept. Isostasy is motionless, balanced, floating. The density of something affects its isostasy, like how high it sits in the _______ (liquid of your choice).  Our class found the percentage of a block of wood below the water. It was about half, or fifty percent, because the density was .5. The density of water at room temperature is about one. We observed that if the blocks' density is always half of the liquids', it will always float halfway out of the water, no matter how big. We also observed this in Mr. Gonzalezs' Isostasy Simulator (you can access this by going to his moodle, click on Isostasy Simulator at the bottom of the page, and click it again at the page you come to.) I love Isostasy!!




Article posted February 9, 2010 at 02:11 AM GMT • comment • Reads 53



Article posted January 26, 2010 at 12:23 AM GMT • comment • Reads 49

Article posted January 26, 2010 at 12:23 AM GMT • comment • Reads 49



Article posted January 17, 2010 at 01:42 AM GMT • comment • Reads 50

Article posted January 17, 2010 at 01:42 AM GMT • comment • Reads 50



Article posted January 12, 2010 at 03:38 PM GMT • comment • Reads 41

Please forgive me for not glogging. I am having some technical difficulties with my password being recognized on glogster. I promise I haven't forgotten it. I'm not doing this just to get out of glogging, either. It just doesn't like me.



Anyhoo, I have started this blog mostly to tell you that I have discovered something amazing. A possum is inhabiting my backyard. Moo ah ha ha ha haa! Evil possum! When I first discovered his evil plan to invade Washington State(or should i say my Dad did...), I was getting ready for a average, fairly normal day. Suddenly, I hear a scream. "EEEEEAAH! Millie (my moms' nickname), Sarah, come quick! I don't know what it is!!" my dad yells. We rush to the front door, and there, sitting on our front porch, eating some suet(bird food)is something. It is the possum. What nerve! And he's sopping wet, and apparently, very hungry.



Later, after I get home from school, I do some research on the possum. Turns out, they usually live in warmer, southern states. Never lived in WA, though. Due to the warming period the earth is experiencing, possums have started to move north. I wonder, do possums really hang by their skinny tails?

Article posted January 12, 2010 at 03:38 PM GMT • comment • Reads 41



Article posted January 5, 2010 at 01:19 AM GMT • comment • Reads 49

If it is, then there could be several reasons why. #1 You're in a room with several windows, and sunlight is pouring in through all of them. #2 The heater is turned up WAY too high. #3 You've come inside from a cold day outside, and haven't bothered taking your coat off. You have been here for about twenty minutes. All of these things are examples of Heat Energy Transfers. Each one is different. There's radiation, convection, and conduction. But first let's talk about heat. What's Heat? Heat is the vibration of molecules in a substance. Heat is generated when molecules begin to vibrate. Heat is more easily transfered in solids because their molecules are closer together and molecules don't have to vibrate as much to bump into their neighbor. Back to the three types of energy transfer... radiation happens when a heat source transfers heat to a substance indirectly, whether through gas, liquid, or solid. Convection is when heat is atrracted to a substance that is cool. It leaves the former substance and moves to this new one. Convection can happen only in liquids or gases. An example is coolant in an engine of a car. Conduction happens when a direct heat source passes heat to another substance. The objects must be touching. The most effective conductive heat transfer happens in solids. Can you guess which type of heat tranfer is occuring in each situation?.... Kinda cool, huh?

Article posted January 5, 2010 at 01:19 AM GMT • comment • Reads 49



Article posted January 5, 2010 at 12:50 AM GMT • comment • Reads 45

Like I said, what's the difference? Recently, our class did a lab about observation and inference. One of the examples in the assignment was "You are walking near a stream. You see several large boulders laying in the stream bed. You think, 'A big flood must have washed these boulders downstream." We were asked to identify the observation and inference in this example. An observation is when you notice, or sense something (with your ears, eyes, nose, and hopefully NOT mouth!), such as large boulders in a small stream. This triggers the thought 'What happened here?' You automatically work out what must have happened to these boulders in the space of a few seconds.This idea is an inference. You infer (figure out) what happened without actually seeing it. So, the difference is that an observation is something that you see in the present, and an inference is thinking about that observation and coming to an answer that doesn't entirely depend on the observation.

Article posted January 5, 2010 at 12:50 AM GMT • comment • Reads 45



Article posted December 21, 2009 at 02:33 AM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 38

...Or whatever you want to call it. Noisy, weird, funny... irritating... At any rate, the first two days of break have been suprisingly, well, uneventful. I did some Christmas shopping with my parents, shopped around in the mall, did some more shopping. You know, I really don't like shopping. I love the rain, but OH, how I wish it would SNOW! My cats don't like the snow, but they are always determined to get out of the house, rain, shine, or blizzard. Not that we've had much of that around here. Does any one hate blue sky as much as I do? Not a nice sunny day with puffy clouds, but a real, hot, stuffy, no-clouds-in-sight day? My cat is being a big bum. He simply refuses to come inside. To top it off, my other cat just ran outside and the last one would have followed if I hadn't been able to grab his fluffy tail. Just to clarify, my cats are not indoor cats, but we always keep them in at night. We live right between Quicene and Chimacum, but not close enough to walk anywhere. There are coyotes and cougars on our property, and on occasion we see a bear. So you can understand why we would want to keep our cats inside at night. I really feel like eating a cookie right now. Or mexican food. Snowmen are cool. Totally. 



Article posted December 21, 2009 at 02:33 AM GMT • comment (1) • Reads 38



Article posted November 22, 2009 at 10:34 PM GMT • comment (2) • Reads 118

Hi, our class did a lab last week. We mixed vinegar and baking soda together to find out how much gas it produced. When vinegar and baking soda mix, it produces carbon dioxide. We measured this by filling a test tube with baking soda and a balloon with vinegar. We attached the balloon to the tube without mixing it, then tipped it upside down. when the balloon was at its biggest, we used a piece of string to measure the circumference of the balloon. My group changed the amount of vinegar put into the balloon. Can you guess how much 15 ml of vinegar made with one spoonful of baking soda? 5cm? 10cm? 15cm?  TWENTY-SIX!! Amazing, right?

Article posted November 22, 2009 at 10:34 PM GMT • comment (2) • Reads 118



Article posted November 2, 2009 at 04:53 PM GMT • comment • Reads 41

Watch this movie! it's cool!


Podcast Play
Podcast Download

Article posted November 2, 2009 at 04:53 PM GMT • comment • Reads 41



Article posted October 1, 2009 at 01:02 AM GMT • comment (3) • Reads 53

COWS!! They usually only live in fields and barns, right? Wrong! In New Delhi, India, sacred cows wander the streets, eating out of the stalls in the market and even stopping to rest in the middle of a busy intersection! But it seems, according to an article, that some people are going to try to put a stop to this. "Cow Catchers" patrol the streets in search of rogue cows. I was shocked, too! Some cows have even come to recognize the catchers truck! The catchers do this for the cows own safety. When the cows eat out of market stalls and garbage cans, they ingest plastic bags, metal, and all sorts of things along with the food.These bags may start to clog the stomach and intestines, blocking them and killing the cow. The catchers deliver the cows that they catch to a safe farm where they can live in peace, out of reach of the killing urban bags.

Article posted October 1, 2009 at 01:02 AM GMT • comment (3) • Reads 53



Article posted October 1, 2009 at 01:01 AM GMT • comment (3) • Reads 74

1) I wear soft-lens contacts



2) I'm Chinese-American



3) I have three cats



4) my favorite color is green



5) my room is yellow



6) I usually wear ankle socks



7) my favorite food is Korean food

Article posted October 1, 2009 at 01:01 AM GMT • comment (3) • Reads 74



Previous Entries All Entries       All Titles
Login
Copyright (c) 2014 by Conditions of Use    Privacy Policy Return to Blogmeister