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Exploring Earth Science

8th Grade Science

Welcome to Mr. Ullrich's Blog! This blog is for 8th Grade Earth Science and Physical Science students. We will learn topics such as Astronomy, Geology and Meteorology. This blog will give us a place to discuss, learn and develop these topics during the year. If you are not from our class please post lots of comments!

by Mr. Ullrich

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Article posted January 8, 2012 at 08:17 PM GMT-5 • comment (1) • Reads 6377

Earths is Getting Hotter, is Global Warming our Fault?



One of the most important and highly debated scientific issues is global warming. Most scientists feel that global warming has the potential to have a serious impact world climate. The global climate has risen over the past hundred years. The question is has it risen because of human activities or is this simply a natural warming cycle? There are some who feel that carbon dioxide emissions will have very little impact on the Earth’ climate. What do you think? Have you ever read about global warming? One thing that is for sure is that there are no clear cut answers. I can’t wait to see what you think in our next assignments after getting the facts. Here are a few videos to get you started :)



For Global Warming:









Against Global Warming:





Article posted January 8, 2012 at 08:17 PM GMT-5 • comment (1) • Reads 6377



Article posted January 8, 2012 at 08:08 PM GMT-5 • comment • Reads 109




Article posted January 8, 2012 at 08:08 PM GMT-5 • comment • Reads 109



Article posted April 26, 2011 at 03:04 PM GMT-5 • comment (5) • Reads 192



So the end of the year is coming up fast....it is the last day of spring break ALREADY!!!  On that note it is time to study for the regents Exam.  We will do our first practice exam soon and you should start working on the first four exams in your Red Barron's Review Book.  Remember for the Regents it is all about how much you study!   A couple of students have asked me about review classes...I have listed them below if you would like to enroll and get some extra review.  



Molloy Weekly Review:



coned.molloy.edu/ShowSchedule.awp



Adelphi One Day Class:



www.passtheregents.com/nav/subject/lid/1/sid/3/Long_Island_Earth_Science_Exam_Review

Article posted April 26, 2011 at 03:04 PM GMT-5 • comment (5) • Reads 192



Article posted December 23, 2010 at 07:01 PM GMT-5 • comment (7) • Reads 161

I wanted to post some lunar eclipse photos my student Brian H took at around 2am eastern time on Dec. 21st. If you have your own pictures please put them on your blog and leave the link as a comment here so we can all check them out..whoever has the best pictures will earn three group points....and barging rights! :)



Lunar Eclipse



Lunar Eclipse 2

Article posted December 23, 2010 at 07:01 PM GMT-5 • comment (7) • Reads 161



Article posted December 9, 2010 at 06:04 PM GMT-5 • comment (6) • Reads 209

What an amazing month for budding astronomers and science geeks alike...yes I am talking to you ;) This month there is going to be a lunar eclipse, a meteor shower and some spectacular opportunity to view planets. You will be able to see Venus, Mercury and even the rings of Saturn which will be easy to view due to their tilt relative to the Earth. Now all you need to know is when and where to look! You may even want to photograph or shoot video of these events. Watch the video and check out the link for more information. Just don't forget to bundle up and get ready to be impressed!







[LINK]

Article posted December 9, 2010 at 06:04 PM GMT-5 • comment (6) • Reads 209



Article posted November 16, 2010 at 06:38 PM GMT-5 • comment (9) • Reads 124

Leonid Meteor Shower - 2010 - It looks like we will miss the peak due to inclement weather. I copied an article below that explains the shower as well as a link to the full article. For your enjoyment I also included a video of what the meteor shower looks like....enjoy!







"Wednesday night will be the peak of the 2010 Leonid meteor shower—but North American sky-watchers hoping to see the Leonids at their best will have to set early morning alarms Tuesday night.



Historically the November Leonids deliver one of the most active of the annual meteor showers. Occasionally the Leonids produce bona fide meteor storms, with rates of a few hundred to thousands of shooting stars an hour during the peak. (Get the scoop on last year's Leonids.)



This year's performance is expected to be modest but still a good sky show, with peak rates of up to 20 meteors an hour.



The best viewing dates for this year will be Wednesday and Thursday, with the official peak occurring on Wednesday at midday in North America, a time slot that favors observers in Asia.



"The meteors will appear to radiate from the constellation Leo, the lion, which rises around midnight in the east," said Raminder Singh Samra, resident astronomer at the H.R. MacMillan Space Centre in Vancouver, Canada.



"Meteor activity should pick up closer to early morning hours [in North America on Wednesday] as the Earth plows through the comet debris" that creates the meteor shower, Samra said. (See asteroid and comet pictures.)



No matter the location, observers will have to contend with the moon, which will be close to full and up for most of the night. That means bright moonlight will wash out many of the fainter meteor trails, Samra said.



But the moon will set a couple hours before sunrise, when the most intense part of the shower should start to kick in, he added.



Modest Leonids May Still Surprise



As with other meteor showers, such as the Perseids in August and the Orionids in October, the Leonids are named for the constellation that appears to be the shower's source. (See Perseids pictures.)



In reality, the Leonids, and most other meteor showers, happen when Earth plows through a trail of debris left in the wake of a comet orbiting the sun—in this case, comet Tempel-Tuttle."



Article Author:



Andrew Fazekas



for National Geographic News



Published November 16, 2010



Full Article:



[LINK]



Scheduel of 2010 Meteor Showers:



[LINK]

Article posted November 16, 2010 at 06:38 PM GMT-5 • comment (9) • Reads 124



Article posted November 11, 2010 at 05:17 PM GMT-5 • comment (12) • Reads 150

In the next few days we will start learning about the moon, its phases, eclipses, and tides.  Our timing couldn't be better!  On December 21st there will be a lunar eclipse vissable from the united states.  It is a great chance to see an amazing astronomical event.  You will have to wake up and bundle up, but it will be worth it!  The best part is that it will be a TOTAL lunar exlipse where the entire moon will enter earths shadow.  Special thanks to Bernatette for her blog on this topic.  I included some pictures and two links.  The first is a pdf showing where and when the eclipse will be vissable and the second is the link to Bernadettes blog.  Check it out and comment!











http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/OH/OHfigures/OH2010-Fig04.pdf





http://classblogmeister.com/blog.php?blogger_id=292186&user_id=292186&blog_id=1233470&position2=-1

Article posted November 11, 2010 at 05:17 PM GMT-5 • comment (12) • Reads 150



Article posted October 22, 2010 at 07:07 PM GMT-5 • comment (18) • Reads 273

I love to travel and take photos; I think that photography is a great creative outlet. How many places have you visited in the United States?



In one of my previous articles you can see the states that I have visited. For this challenge see if you can name each state and location. Try to be specific. Hint...I may have used some states more than once. The photos are in number order; see if you can guess all ten places!



Whoever guesses the most correctly will earn three group points. Post your response as a comment. If you are not in one of my classes (class password is herricks)....you will earn my respect...plus it’s fun so give it a try!



 





1)You wouldn't want to be sent here.

1



2)Very reliable...

2



3)Do you really need a hint?

3



4)A curvy street.

4



5)One of the first national parks.

5



6)Named after part of a volcano (well it actually is a part of one!)

6



7)Surfs up!

7



8)No help needed here!

P5280030



9)It's name starts with Mt. :P

9



10)Note the shape of the rock.

10

Article posted October 22, 2010 at 07:07 PM GMT-5 • comment (18) • Reads 273



Article posted March 14, 2010 at 09:13 PM GMT-5 • comment (2) • Reads 176

I can’t believe how quickly the year is flying by.....you are going to be enjoying your state exams in just a couple of months YaY!!!



I have been having some problems with automated spam comments on our blogs. We are now using a class password. While this is annoying it seems necessary. I would like to keep the password public as I want others to be able to continue to comment on your blogs. If the problem persists I will have to change the password. If you comment on any one else’s blog be sure to give them the password or they will be unable to comment back. Keep blogging, your new assignment is up!



Class Password = herricks



Some cool science song videos you should check out! Which is your favorite?















[LINK]

Article posted March 14, 2010 at 09:13 PM GMT-5 • comment (2) • Reads 176



Article posted February 11, 2010 at 12:04 PM GMT-5 • comment • Reads 88

I hope you are out enjoying the snow instead of stressing over our test! 



I know you will all be very upset at having to postpone a very enjoyable test ....but in light of the two snow days we will be moving our Topic 7 test to the Tuesday after vacation. 



 Let the other students know  :)



Article posted February 11, 2010 at 12:04 PM GMT-5 • comment • Reads 88



Article posted January 20, 2010 at 08:38 PM GMT-5 • comment (9) • Reads 107

One of the most important and highly debated scientific issues is global warming. Most scientists feel that global warming has the potential to have a serious impact on world climate. The global climate has risen over the past hundred years. The question is, has it risen because of human activities or is this simply a natural warming cycle? There are some who feel that carbon dioxide emissions will have very little impact on the Earth’ climate. What do you think? Have you ever read about global warming? One thing that is for sure is that there are no clear cut answers. I can’t wait to see what you think in our next assignments. Here are a few videos to get you started :)



For Global Warming:







Against Global Warming:



Article posted January 20, 2010 at 08:38 PM GMT-5 • comment (9) • Reads 107



Article posted December 15, 2009 at 06:28 PM GMT-5 • comment (14) • Reads 71

This is a cool site to check out if you are into traveling. You can mark off the places you have visited and generate maps to show your readers where you have traveled. I marked off all the states that I have been to, still a few left though I have been to most of the ones on my need to visit list. As far as the rest of the world, I still have my work cut out! Enjoy :)








create your own personalized map of the USA

or write about it on the open travel guide

Article posted December 15, 2009 at 06:28 PM GMT-5 • comment (14) • Reads 71



Article posted December 6, 2009 at 06:17 PM GMT-5 • comment (7) • Reads 58

The Geminids Meteor Shower will be visible on the 13/14th of December.  It shold be spectacular.  In Herricks, we are hampered by light pollution because of our close proximity to the city.  With a clear view of the sky as many as 100 meteors per hour can be visible.  The best time to view the shower will be between midnight and dawn Monday morning.  I included a map of the southern sky below.   Enjoy



Geminids Meteor Shower Radiant





 



Article posted December 6, 2009 at 06:17 PM GMT-5 • comment (7) • Reads 58



Article posted November 4, 2009 at 09:07 AM GMT-5 • comment (6) • Reads 53

Article posted November 4, 2009 at 09:07 AM GMT-5 • comment (6) • Reads 53



Article posted March 9, 2009 at 05:20 PM GMT-5 • comment (11) • Reads 60

I wanted to put this video up on the main blog page. This video was an air pressure experiment that we did in class last week. Mumti was nice enough to make it into a video and put it online for us! If you try the experiment be careful and make sure you get permission from your parent or guardian, don’t have anything flammable around and wear your safety goggles.



Enjoy :)





Article posted March 9, 2009 at 05:20 PM GMT-5 • comment (11) • Reads 60



Article posted March 3, 2009 at 06:49 PM GMT-5 • comment (2) • Reads 49

Time is flying by!



I can’t believe it is already March! It doesn’t feel like spring yet but it is close :)



Your next assignment is up, on renewable energy. It should be fun to see what you find. There are lots of options out there. Some times the drawbacks outweigh the benefits. Think about both sides of your energy source and try to come up with a well developed opinion.



If you have any suggestions for our next blog article (assignment)leave a comment. Try to make it go along with the environmental theme…if we use your idea I will give you extra points!



A video to get the creativity flowing:

Article posted March 3, 2009 at 06:49 PM GMT-5 • comment (2) • Reads 49



Article posted February 5, 2009 at 08:13 PM GMT-5 • comment (2) • Reads 56

One of the most important and highly debated scientific issues is global warming. Most scientists feel that global warming has the potential to have a serious impact on world climate. The global climate has risen over the past hundred years. The question is, has it risen because of human activities or is this simply a natural warming cycle? There are some who feel that carbon dioxide emissions will have very little impact on the Earth’ climate. What do you think? Have you ever read about global warming? One thing that is for sure is that there are no clear cut answers. I can’t wait to see what you think in our next assignments. Here are a few videos to get you started :)



For Global Warming:







Against Global Warming:



Article posted February 5, 2009 at 08:13 PM GMT-5 • comment (2) • Reads 56



Article posted December 17, 2008 at 09:58 PM GMT-5 • comment (1) • Reads 50



When you have an audience it is good to get to know them. On a blog this is very true. You want to know about the people reading your blog. In this case your teacher is trying to decide on your test date and see what you think. There are a number of online surveys you can use and post on your blog. They can be fun and many are free. The one I would like to show you is called SurveyMonkey. It is simple and easy to navigate. The website can be used for free. Take the survey below. Would you use it in your own blog? Let me know what you think :)



Click on the link below to take the Survey:



Click Here to take survey





Tutorial on using the website:





Article posted December 17, 2008 at 09:58 PM GMT-5 • comment (1) • Reads 50



Article posted December 9, 2008 at 08:02 PM GMT-5 • comment (2) • Reads 126

An excellent tool that every one should try out is Google Sky. It is an amazing program for anyone interested in learning about space. You can download Google Earth/Sky for free! After you install Google Earth/Sky, just open the program. Near the top of the page there is a small picture of Saturn. When you click on it you switch automatically from Google Earth to Google Sky. Now you can search for any celestial object you would like to view. You can search manually or type a name in the search box and it will automatically move to what you would like to observe. There is an assortment of tools to use, so experiment with it! One of my favorite tools is the education center; make sure it is checked off on the tool bar to the left. Now you can click on many objects and get information, images and even videos! Try it out and let me know what you think :)



Copy and Paste the link below to download Google Earth, which also comes with Google Sky.



[LINK]





Short videos about Google Sky:













Article posted December 9, 2008 at 08:02 PM GMT-5 • comment (2) • Reads 126



Article posted December 2, 2008 at 07:07 PM GMT-5 • comment (13) • Reads 44

Monday December 1st 2008 was a spectacular day to observe the night sky.  When looking up at the waxing crescent moon right after sunset you could clearly see the planets Venus and Jupiter.   As the month goes on they will become harder to see until they are no longer visible.  You can still see them so check it out as this view won't be around again for forty years! 




Here is a link to an article with more information:




www.space.com/spacewatch/081128-ns-moon-jupiter-venus.html






Article posted December 2, 2008 at 07:07 PM GMT-5 • comment (13) • Reads 44



Article posted November 22, 2008 at 10:57 AM GMT-5 • comment (4) • Reads 50

One of the most fascinating things in astronomy is the black hole.  They are interesting because there is so much that still needs to be learned.  Do they lead to a new dimension?  What happens to matter when it enters a black hole?  Will they someday consume most of the matter that makes up our Universes?  The link below is a NOVA show that does a good job of explaining black holes.  Just click on the link (QuickTime, Real video, Windows Media) under the picture of each chapter to watch the show.  It’s a little over 40 minutes and very interesting.  Enjoy! 



www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/blackhole/program.html



en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_holes



Picture of a Simulated Black Hole



Article posted November 22, 2008 at 10:57 AM GMT-5 • comment (4) • Reads 50



Article posted November 21, 2008 at 06:23 PM GMT-5 • comment (2) • Reads 57

I thought this was an interesting idea that I would share with you



When we look out into space we are actually looking back in time!  Let’s fist think about a simple example.   Since light from the Sun takes about eight minutes to reach Earth,  if the Sun were to cease shining, we would still receive light (see the Sun) for eight minutes.  When we look into space, the other stars in our galaxy (Milky Way) are at much greater distances than the Sun.  Because of this, when you look at a star you are actually looking at light that has been traveling for hundreds or even thousands of years!  In a sense, when you look at the night sky you are looking back in time! 



Staring into the cosmos



“Staring into the cosmos. The Hubble Ultra Deep Field is the deepest image ever taken of the universe in visible light. The bright and sparkling spots are not stars but galaxies. The nearest one is about one billion light-years away, and since one light-year is the distance light travels in a year, the view is of that one galaxy as it appeared a billion years ago.”



 Photo: NASA, ESA, R. Windhorst (ArizonaStateUniversity) and H. Yan (SpitzerScienceCenter, Caltech



www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2008/08/04/science/space/080508-Hubble_14.html



www.nytimes.com/2008/08/05/science/space/05books.html

Article posted November 21, 2008 at 06:23 PM GMT-5 • comment (2) • Reads 57



Article posted November 1, 2008 at 11:41 PM GMT-5 • comment (3) • Reads 56

NASA Mars Probe Sacrifices Arm to Extend Mission Life (Update1)



By Demian McLean Oct. 29 (Bloomberg) --



NASA's Phoenix Lander, in its fifth month of searching for signs of life on Mars, lost a limb today as it shut down equipment in a bid to survive a little longer on the frigid Red Planet. A heater that maintains its sole robotic arm was switched off overnight, one of several that will be powered down in coming weeks, NASA said. The probe, which has surpassed its expected lifespan by two months, is trying to keep crucial batteries and cameras warm. Temperatures dropped as low as minus 139 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 95 Celsius) last week, forcing the craft's on-board heaters to work harder. At the same time, the sun is weakening as autumn approaches, starving the lander's solar panels. ``We could lose Phoenix today or in the next several weeks,'' Veronica McGregor, a spokeswoman at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, said by telephone. ``We're trying to eke out as much as we can from the spacecraft; anything is a bonus.'' The probe's biggest discovery came in June when it found sheets of ice several inches below the red soil, showing the planet has a key ingredient for life, even if in frozen form, scientists say. Phoenix's 8-foot (2.4-meter) arm sports a soil probe, a shovel and drill, which penetrated several feet of dirt at the landing spot near Mars's northern polar cap. More Data Coming The Phoenix heated soil samples in small onboard ovens, which ``sniffed'' for chemicals and trace elements. Scientists say the red dirt could support asparagus or other alkaline-loving plants if they had sunlight, water and other ingredients. A thermal and electrical-conductivity probe, which sits on the arm, will stay inserted in the soil. It needs no heater and can send back data for weeks, NASA said. Any energy saved will feed Phoenix's main camera and weather instruments. Unheated electronics will eventually succumb to polar temperatures as low as minus 225 degrees Fahrenheit. Mars's seasons last twice as long as Earth's. That makes it unlikely Phoenix will thaw out and return to service after autumn and winter, which start Dec. 26 and May 22, respectively, said McGregor. The probe parachuted to the surface in late May of this year. Follow the Water Phoenix is part of NASA's current theme in Mars exploration: Follow the water, which a prerequisite for life. Viking probes also examined Martian soil in the 1970s, though the samples at those sites lacked much ice. Phoenix, built by Lockheed Martin Corp., is NASA's third probe active on the planet, along with the wheeled rovers Spirit and Opportunity. Engineers can wring more power from Phoenix in coming weeks by shutting down heaters that warm the camera and batteries. That would leave just one survival heater. Eventually, the sun will drop below the horizon. Wind gusts, which reached 36 miles per hour (58 kph) this month, will buffet Phoenix, and an ice coating of water and carbon dioxide will cover the lander's solar panels, ending its life. ``At that point, Phoenix will be at the mercy of Mars,'' Chris Lewicki, lead Phoenix mission manager at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, said in a statement.




Article posted November 1, 2008 at 11:41 PM GMT-5 • comment (3) • Reads 56



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