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FamousStar3000

2009

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by FamousStar3000

teacher: Gordon Brune

Class Assignments
Blog Entries
Letter to my 12th grade self (A) 06/26/09
Constitution Works (A) 06/26/09
Akeelah and the Bee (A) 06/24/09
Always her (WP) 06/11/09
Let’s see what we can do to re-re-redo those public bathrooms! (A) 06/08/09
Happy Birthday FamousStar3000 (WP) 06/04/09
So-so-da (WP) 06/03/09
Ants ALWAYS get their way! (N) 05/29/09
Was our last field trip fun? (WP) 05/28/09
Who did you want to be at our field trip? (WP) 05/28/09
Show All
A hillbilly moment (WP, Video) 05/26/09
What kind of dog do you like? (WP) 05/20/09
Read this! (WP) 05/20/09
I want that job! (WP) 05/19/09
Dont Trust Her (WP) 05/14/09
She’s not that old…! (N) 05/05/09
What is your favorite animal? (WP) 05/04/09
SHORT SHORTS #2 (WP) 04/28/09
SHORT SHORTS (WP, Audio) 04/27/09
Famousstar3000 (WP) 04/27/09
SHOES (WP) 04/21/09
Favorite color poll (WP) 04/20/09
THATS HILARIOUS! (N) 04/17/09
Want to have the best time of your liiiffffeeee? (A) 04/03/09
That’s Incredible! (N) 03/27/09
D.A.R.E (A) 03/24/09
Hey hey you you!! - Girlfriend (WP, Video) 03/17/09
Wimpy Kid Comic Contest (A) 03/16/09
Hawaiian Princess (WP) 03/14/09
The Human Vending Machine (N) 03/14/09
Bueler Challenger Center (A) 03/11/09
Final Pioneer Diary Entry (A) 03/10/09
When I growup (WP, Video) 03/05/09
The biggest, no, I mean smallest car built (N) 02/13/09
Messed up cakes?! (WP) 02/09/09
Everytime We Touch, by Casada (WP, Video) 02/08/09
Potential Breakup, lyrics By Aly and Aj (WP, Video) 01/31/09
Do you like crossword puzzles? (N) 01/30/09
American Boy (WP, Audio) 01/27/09
Do you like chewing on pencils? (N) 12/17/08
Wouldn’t that be cool? (N) 12/08/08
My friends (WP) 12/05/08
Me and my sister Ginger (WP) 12/05/08
The values of American Democracy (A) 11/19/08
Famousstar3000's School Report (A) 11/19/08
I don’t love Scrabble that much! (WP) 11/12/08
Robot’s that do your work? (WP) 11/05/08
I would NEVER do that! (WP) 11/03/08
Wow, Imagine walking to school like this! (WP) 11/03/08
The Carnival (WP, Audio) 10/31/08
McCain vs. Obama (A) 10/28/08
The Twelve Million Dollar Clock? (N) 10/16/08
The second edition of. . .(WP) 10/15/08
Do you want to take the bus to Australia? (N) 10/14/08
My beautiful dog (WP) 10/06/08
I am getting a new pet (A) 10/03/08
I can't believe that! (WP) 10/02/08
Jan! Put that net down! (N) 10/02/08
Dear Diary (WP) 09/24/08
All the teachers I had in my life (WP) 09/24/08
America Is. . . (A) 09/17/08
Trouble- The Twelve Million Dollar Dog (N) 09/16/08
Fan World (WP) 09/15/08
The Skeleton Man (WP) 09/15/08

Title: Return to the Moon (A) (03/09/09)
Description: The year is 2015. For the first time since 1972, a crew of astronauts is returning to the Moon... this time to stay. Leaving Earth's orbit, then entering lunar orbit, they will launch a probe to the Moon's surface to gather data which will help them determine the best lunar landing site. Their goal is to establish a permanent base on the lunar surface for observation and exploration and as a stepping stone for future, manned explorations.

Go HERE for more information on the Buehler Challenger and Science Center.

Article posted March 9, 2009 at 03:24 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 737

I was part of the Medical Team.



Some of responsibilities were to get four peoples’ eyesight and record that and to take peoples’ temperatures and record that.



The most important thing I think I had to do was taking the eyesight and logging that in the booklet I had. But the most difficult thing I had to do was logging all the information in and finding the mean of it.



If I had a chance to go back again, I would change the yelling and screaming I did. I think the Buehler Space Center was really fun, and it taught me a lot of what the real life astronauts would do and how they feel.

Article posted March 9, 2009 at 03:24 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 737



Article posted March 12, 2009 at 03:42 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 80

I was part of the Team Remote. My responsibilities were observing rocks, looking to see what color they were and feeling them with the special gloves you have to wear. The important information I colleted was about the highland and lowland and where on the moon it's high and low. The part of my job that was most difficult was finding the color, texture, and luster. If I were to fly again, I would try not to get mad at my teammates for doing something wrong. Take your time, thing carefully, and slow down.

Article posted March 12, 2009 at 03:42 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 80



Article posted March 9, 2009 at 03:27 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 82

I and a lot of other astronauts just came back from the moon. It was actually a mission to return to the moon, to establish a permanent base on the moon. And that mission was successful!



I was on the Probe Team. I was responsible for making a probe, to launch it into space, and make sure that the probe was all built correctly. (A probe is a data collecting device which explores the moon’s surface.) When I was in spacecraft I had to go into a room. There was a cabinet which had all the parts to the probe and there was a bigger cabinet which held the probe. You would have to pull the cabinet open and pull out the probe.



I collected a lot of information during this mission. I learned all the probe parts, their names, and where to put them. I found out a lot of interesting things.



What I found the most difficult in my job was building the probe. When you mess up you usually have done something wrong in the beginning and that means you would have to start all over again.



If I had a chance to fly again, I think I would do my job a little faster than I did this time. I found out that I needed to get the probe built quickly, and I was taking my time.



I thought the mission was fun. I think future Mission Specialists need to know that’s it’s a lot of work. And if you’re in space on the mission you can’t see Mission Control; they’re all the way down in Houston, Texas. The only way you can communicate with Mission Control is by your computer and a satellite radio.

Article posted March 9, 2009 at 03:27 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 82



Article posted March 9, 2009 at 03:26 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 102

I and a lot of the other astronauts just came back from visiting the moon for our very first time. It was very cool! I had a big responsibility with my very good friend MusicGirl. We were both on the Communications Team. By the way, we went to the moon to establish a permanent base on the moon.



For my job I had to receive and send out messages. But I did not get a computer to work with. I only had to use my voice. On the table that I was sittng at I got a microphone and a pencil. In front of me there were two screens so I could also see what was going around in space and in my room. How I would receive messages is that people working around me would bring me messages and I would send them off through the microphone into “space” so they could know exactly what they had to do. I would also receive messages from “space” telling me and other members in my room that they could hear us and they understood what they had to do in space.



Some important things that I got from space were telling me that the other groups working around me had given me great messages and that the people in “space” had gotten them and that they were doing what they were supposed to be doing. It was good to know that the people in “space” were doing what they were supposed to do.



The part that I found most difficult was that I had to repeat myself a lot and that got annoying because if I had to repeat myself than the other messages that I had to say out into the microphone would be a little late getting out because I would have to say the other message again. Also what I found was difficult was that I had to speak REALLY loud and clearly so the people in space or on earth could actually understand me so I didn’t have to repeat myself.



If I were to fly again, I would probably be less nervous. In the beginning I was a little nervous because I had never done it before. Also I would say everything a lot more loud so I wouldn't have to even repeat myself once or even twice. It was the best mission that I’ve ever heard of. And for the next astronauts that travel to the moon, all they need to worry about is having fun and enjoy traveling to the moon.

Article posted March 9, 2009 at 03:26 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 102



Article posted March 12, 2009 at 06:46 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 97

I was i part of the Isolation Team. What I had to do was make sure I didn’t drop the” poisonous” chemicals. It was hard to send the messages and move a robot arm. And there’s a camera on the robot so the other Isolation Team member can see you mess up or do good.



All you need to do is pay attention to the teacher and when he/she says, ”look up” you look up. That’s all. And follows directions. If I had the chance to fly again, I’d go faster.

Article posted March 12, 2009 at 06:46 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 97



Article posted March 11, 2009 at 03:16 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 110

I was part of the Remote Team. My job responsibilities were that we had to study rocks. We also had to study about the lunar lowlands and the high lands.



The most important information we collected was that we had to study about rocks texture and color.



The most difficult thing was that we had to find the different teams of the rocks because they were all over the place.



If I had another chance to fly I would make sure that I would never get interrupted.



In the future, Specialist, should know to stay focused in your work because they can get interrupted by people.

Article posted March 11, 2009 at 03:16 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 110



Article posted March 11, 2009 at 03:20 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 82

My mission name was “Return to the Moon.” I was part of the Life Support Team. My job responsibilities included: checking the oxygen tank, changing the oxygen tank, checking the temperature and heat, and checking and adjusting the electrical system. I also had to receive and send messages.



The most important information I collected during the mission was that the heat was too high. Then smoke came out, and I admit it, I WAS a little scared. I tried to blow out the smoke. The commander gave me beanbags to hand to every computer to absorb the moisture, and after that, the situation was over.



The most difficult part of my job was the heat situation because I had to hand beanbags to all 5 or 4 computers so the smoke can go away. After the situation was over, there was still a little smoke coming out, but I blew it out.



If I had the chance to fly again, I would try to get through everything quick. I would change the oxygen tank fast, I would test the electricity fast, and if by any chance the heat situation comes up again, I would quickly hand out the beanbags. If I didn’t understand something, I would ask the Commander fast.



I think my experience was fun because I changed the oxygen tank and checked the electricity by myself. I also think my job was difficult because the electricity power was 7 and a half. The Mission Specialists need to know about that.

Article posted March 11, 2009 at 03:20 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 82



Article posted March 11, 2009 at 03:14 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 98



 


My Time at Buhler Challenger Center


 


Hi my name is FamousStar3000, and I was part of the Data Team. My responsibilities were to check emails people sent me or maybe forward, print them out, and give them to person. Sometimes people come up to me and gave me a sticky note, and I would have to type it up on my computer and send it to the right person. It was kind of hard if you think about it. So many emails coming at you so fast at one time! Sometimes the Commander would come up to me and check if everything was OK. If I did something wrong everybody would blame it on me and the Commander would come up and yell at me.


 Scary.


 The most important thing I collected was collecting all of the post-it notes and writing them on the computer. The other most important thing I had to do was look in the inbox to check if there was mail. Then I would have to do something with it like send it or print it out.


 


 The most difficult time when I was doing my job was when I forgot to check my inbox and all of these messages popped up. I was so behind everybody else!!! I got embarrassed (I don’t get embarrassed easy.), but I was kind of laughing at myself for messing up at the same time.


 


The next time I am in a spaceship, I wouldn’t forget to check my inbox!!!!! Another thing is when you are in a spaceship and have a job, don’t fool around. You can get yourself into a lot of danger and. . .well. . .JUST HAVE FUN!!!!!!!


 


If you were my job read this first and think about it. It’s fun but hard at the same time. –Famousstar3000

Article posted March 11, 2009 at 03:14 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 98



Article posted March 12, 2009 at 07:02 PM GMT0 • comment (2) • Reads 100

I was on the Remote Team.



Some of my job responsibilities were to find the luster, the color, and the texture of rocks and minerals.



The most important thing I thought about my job was that most rocks that have cuts are shiny. (You can see these cuts with a magnifying glass.)



I didn’t find anything hard about my job.



I wouldn’t change anything because I though that everything went good.



I would say to the other people going on the next mission, good luck and be careful.

Article posted March 12, 2009 at 07:02 PM GMT0 • comment (2) • Reads 100



Article posted March 12, 2009 at 03:26 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 81

I Was Part of the Remote Team.

My job responsibilities included studying rocks and lunar lowlands and highlands. The most important information I collected during the mission was finding rocks from the lowland and the highlands. The part of my job that I found most difficult was trying to find the texture and the color of the rocks. If I had another chance to fly again, I would do the following things differently: listening more carefully to directions and trying to focus more. Maybe then I would get more done.



Here are some suggestions for you: always listen carefully and you will do better than me, never fool around or you will get in trouble, try your best, and have fun.

Article posted March 12, 2009 at 03:26 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 81



Article posted March 13, 2009 at 03:27 PM GMT0 • comment (2) • Reads 90

Hi, I’m Musicgirl, and I’m going to tell you about my experience about mission “Return to the Moon.” The team I was on was the Communications Team. My job was important because I was the only way to talk to with the people in the Spacecraft and Mission Control. When you’re on the Communications Team you look in video cameras and communicate with the Spacecraft and Mission Control. The most important thing I did in Mission Control was I told the people in the Spacecraft where to land the probe. I think that was so cool. But the coolest thing about it was that the microphone WASN’T EVEN ON! When I spoke it went straight to the computer and the computer typed it. I think the hardest part of my job was trying to read the peoples’ handwriting. I would be in the middle of talking and then I wouldn’t know what to say. But luckily sometimes the Commander was next to me to help me know what the words were. I think if I had the chance to fly again, I would read the notes over before I spoke because then it would be easier for the people in Mission Control and the Spacecraft to understand me so I wouldn’t have to stop in the middle of my sentence. I think that future Mission specialists will need to know that it’s fun, but you need to pay attention. You can’t have your head in the clouds. To the next kids on the Communications Team, “Good Luck."

Article posted March 13, 2009 at 03:27 PM GMT0 • comment (2) • Reads 90



Article posted March 11, 2009 at 02:48 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 103

I was part of the Probe Team. I had to connect wires to the probe, and if I did it wrong the probe would not launch. If we did not build the probe, it would not be able to go into space.



The most important information that I gathered was where to put the wires on the machine. If they would not have told us what to do, then I would have failed the mission. If we put the wires wrong then the probe would not launch and we would not be able to have good a mission.



What I found the most difficult was building the probe and connect the wires so the robe would launch. If the Mission Commander did not tell me what to do then we would not have done it right.



If I had the chance to fly again I would have done the probe quicker. I would have done my job better so we could launch it faster. It was really fun to build the probe. I would like to come back again so I could build it again. I wish I could build the probe again and again and again. It was so cool.

Article posted March 11, 2009 at 02:48 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 103



Article posted March 19, 2009 at 07:18 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 85

When I went to the Buehler Challenger Science & Space Center I was on the Navigation Team. My job was to find the longitude and latitude of places on the moon like the Hercules crater, which is a site in the lowland of the moon.



I think the most important thing I had to do was find how many diameters (DM) the sun and the moon were. I had to line it up, and then I had to show how many Diameters (DM) it was, and how many Milli-diameters (MDM) it was. If I messed up, all of it would be ruined.



If I had a chance to do it again I would have wanted to do it a little faster. Like when I was in Mission Control I and the person in the Spacecraft got a little confused. I guess I went a little ahead on the task cards and by the time he sent me a message I was way ahead of him. (The messages didn’t send that fast because we had to send it, then it would come out of the printer, and then the person at Data would have to bring it all the way to Navigation).



I think the experience kind of made you nervous. For example when Life Support had to fix something and make the temperature of the Spacecraft I think cooler. He finished it with one minute left. If he didn’t, all the computers and electronic stuff would have shut down.



I also think the Mission Specialists need to know that it is kind of nerve racking, and they might get a little confused for a while and that may slow them down.

Article posted March 19, 2009 at 07:18 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 85



Article posted March 11, 2009 at 02:47 PM GMT0 • comment (2) • Reads 103

I was part of the Navigation Team. My responsibilities were to find landing spots and distances. The most important job was to find the diameter of the sun, moon, and earth. I also had to determine a landing spot for our spacecraft.



Most of my job was basic copying from the computer and following directions but I guess the hardest part was determining the exact location in latitude and longitude because it is almost never exact and you almost have to guess on the line it is on.



I think I did everything right. I only know that because everything I did worked out. We landed safely and the mission was a success.



But there were some other jobs I want to do. I only wanted to do them for a while, then I realized there is a fun part of every job. The Navigation position is mostly work. You don’t get to do many things, like some people got to use robots or test things. I didn’t. I got to work on a map and at my computer.



I wouldn’t fool around in the glove box for anyone who works with it. My friend from another mission said the glovebox will smoke up if you play around.

Article posted March 11, 2009 at 02:47 PM GMT0 • comment (2) • Reads 103



Article posted March 19, 2009 at 07:24 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 74

I was part of the Probe Team. I had to build a probe, talk to the other probe members, wear a big, white suit, collect information, instruct probe members, and watch the probe go out in space.



The most important information I collected during the mission was learning to build a probe. Building a probe is important because if I did not build it with my Probe members, it would be a disaster and the probe would not do its job. Another important thing I learned is to listen to two people talking at the same time. It was hard to listen because if I listen to one of the Probe members, I won’t be able to listen to what the Commander has to say.



The hardest thing about being in the probe is listening to what the Commander and my Probe members have to say at the same time. If the Probe members are building the probe in another room, they will not know that the Commander is talking to me and they will say, “What is happening out there?”



If I had the chance to fly again and I want to have a better and faster mission, I will try to do two things differently. They are: try to build the probe faster and instruct my Probe members better so that they don’t need to say, “What?!”



I want to let the future Mission Specialists know that if they are in the Probe Team, you will have A LOT of fun. If you are at Mission Control in Houston, Texas, you will see the Probe members at the Spacecraft in a little screen. Also, if you are in Houston, Texas you will have to write down some information about probes.

Article posted March 19, 2009 at 07:24 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 74



Article posted March 16, 2009 at 03:04 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 80

I was on the Medical Team. We had to do all this care stuff like check people’s eyes and people’s hearing. For example, when they would hear this little beeping sound they would have to click a button and we would have to see if they would respond to the sound. When you are in Mission Control, you have to tell (sometimes) them what team to do next so they could check everyone and make sure no one is sick or anything.



The most important information is the radiation sickness. You get it if it is really hot or really cold, even animals can get the sickness. What it does is it damages the body. The radiation sickness depends on how much radiation you've absorbed. How much you absorb depends on the strength of the radiated energy and the distance between you and the source of radiation.



The most difficult part of my job was that trying to take peoples' skin temperature since they move a lot. Also it was hard to try to think about the amount of people on the space shuttle and the amount of people getting sick. People hate getting sick.



If I can fly again I would try even harder then ever before. It was really hard to hear the Mission Control on the space shuttle with all the screaming and yelling to each other!!!



Buehler Challenger Center was so realistic it made you feel you were on the moon with all this technology that would really be on a space shuttle. It is really, really FUN.

Article posted March 16, 2009 at 03:04 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 80



Article posted March 11, 2009 at 03:13 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 65

I was in control of the data. My responsibility was I was supposed to receive data from Mission Control and Navigation. Then I was supposed to type the note to either Navigation or Mission Control.



I’d say the most significant information I collected was the one to Navigation. It was about the degrees from Life Support’s station.



I thought the hardest part about my job was when I received messages from other stations. They kept sending it to the wrong person. So I had to print another one, and then send it to the right person.



If I had another chance to fly, I’d make sure I get everything right because last time I kept sending the wrong information to the wrong people. The next time I really hope I get everything correct.



Well, I had a really good time at the Buehler Challenger and Science Center. It was challenging and fun and lots of other kids in our class and in other classes from 5th grade said they really liked it.

Article posted March 11, 2009 at 03:13 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 65



Article posted March 27, 2009 at 03:22 PM GMT0 • comment (2) • Reads 85

My job responsibilities were building the probe and talking with my other group members in the headset about what we were supposed to do to build the probe.



The most significant (important) information I collected during the mission was building the probe and hearing what the other people were saying.



The part of my job that I found to be difficult was building the probe. My friend and I messed up putting the wires plugs in. What was also hard was hearing the other person in my group because sometimes they go so fast that you get nervous.



What I will do differently if I had a chance to fly again is go on a real rocket ship because I want to go up to see the moon and stay in space.

Article posted March 27, 2009 at 03:22 PM GMT0 • comment (2) • Reads 85



Article posted March 11, 2009 at 03:24 PM GMT0 • comment (2) • Reads 118

I was part of the Life Support. I had to check the temperature and see if it was too high or low or if it was OK. I also had to put out more oxygen so they didn’t run out of it. If I didn’t the team on the spaceship would have died. I had to record all the data that the other Life Support members gave me so I could tell if they were safe or if they should do something.



The most significant data I collected was the oxygen levels because if they didn’t tell me that it was low I wouldn’t have told them what to do and they could have died. I didn’t think the job was difficult at all except the messages. They were hard because I wrote them kind of slow. But I did it for a reason so that I didn’t mess up and give the wrong message. If I did give the wrong one then maybe they would do the wrong thing and die.



I think everyone’s job was important because they all involved others. For example, if the Data Team didn’t send my message then the other team in space would have died.



It has been really fun, and I would like to come back again. It made us come together and work together like a real team.

Article posted March 11, 2009 at 03:24 PM GMT0 • comment (2) • Reads 118



Article posted April 1, 2009 at 03:18 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 92

In this mission I was part of the Isolation Team. It was so hard because we had to pick up the chemicals, and I kept on dropping them. We also had to weigh the chemicals. That was the most important also the hardest part of the job. When I was in the Mission Control I had to tell my partner in Spacecraft which chemical was dangerous and which was not.



The task was difficult!!



If I could, I would change the way how I picked up the chemicals because I dropped them.



If you plan on going to Buehler, I wish you good luck.



P.S. Get ready for the thrill of your lives!

Article posted April 1, 2009 at 03:18 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 92



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