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A cozy little stop where, technology in language arts, history and geography, meld together for Room 301 students at Deer Park.

by nicole t

teacher: Mr. D

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Title: Animal Farm Reading Response Questions (11/07/08)
Description: 1. What is your reaction to the animals’ revolution?
2. Do you sympathize with the animals’ complaints and goals? Why or why not?
3. Describe how the Rebellion takes place. How does the animals’ behaviour during the Rebellion suggest both human and animal characteristics?
4. How do the pigs gain the rights to the cow’s milk? Why do the other animals allow this to occur? What does this event suggest about the power hierarchy on the farm?
5. How does the original vision of Animalism become the slogan “Four legs bad, two legs good”? In your opinion, do the animals want rules with simple language? What kind of language do the pigs use?
6. What technique does Orwell use to cast doubt on the likelihood of a successful revolution?
7. Characterize Snowball as a leader. Do you think his reaction to the stable-boy’s death is the appropriate reaction to have during a revolution?

Make a list of the characters and what their purpose is in the novel such as actions characteristics.

Example

OLD MAJOR
-Gets revolution going, inspires hope for change

Article posted November 17, 2008 at 03:50 AM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 3071











1. What is your reaction to the animals’ revolution?



My reaction to the animals’ revolution is amazement that a single use of effective propaganda can trigger a revolutionary event such as the one displayed here. I believe that Erik Blair was in this case stating that the main problems in society tend to happen as a result of ourselves more often than our initially believed enemies.



2. Do you sympathize with the animals’ complaints and goals? Why or why not?



I sympathize with the animals’ complaints and goals as their initial idea was to satisfy everyone other than their known enemies, human beings. The main problem that occurred after their success was corruption, and since they had created a non-democratic society, no solution could be initiated.



3. Describe how the Rebellion takes place. How does the animals’ behavior during the Rebellion suggest both human and animal characteristics?



The rebellion was initiated when Mr. Jones forgot to feed the animals, and, as a result, they made an attempt to feed themselves. As the animals got inside the food shed, Mr. Jones was awakened, and he immediately headed to the food shed with whips. Finally, the animals refused to tolerate anything more, and attacked Mr. Jones and his men, driving them out of the farm. The animals characteristics reflect animal behavior by attacking without weapons or plans, and they reflect human behavior by having a known goal, and consciously pursuing it for their own advantage.



4. How do the pigs gain the rights to the cow’s milk? Why do the other animals allow this to occur? What does this event suggest about the power hierarchy on the farm?



The pigs justify their need for the cows’ milk by stating it is necessary for keeping their intelligence in shape. The animals allow this because of the fear of Mr. Jones returning. This demonstrates hierarchy on the farm by allowing different animals to receive different wages, food in this case.



5. How does the original vision of Animalism become the slogan “Four legs bad, two legs good”? In your opinion, do the animals want rules with simple language? What kind of language do the pigs use?



The original vision of Animalism became the slogan “FOUR LEGS GOOD, TWO LEGS BAD” as a result of many animals not being able to clearly remember the seven commandments. The animals want rules with simple language as this makes them easy to understand for the working animals, and easy to interpret in favor of themselves for the pigs. The kind of language the pigs use is known as propaganda.



6. What technique does Orwell use to cast doubt on the likelihood of a successful revolution?



Eric Blair uses a fable metaphor to demonstrate the likelihood of a successful revolution as animals can be easier to understand and relate to due to their deceptive simplicity.



7. Characterize Snowball as a leader. Do you think his reaction to the stable-boy’s death is the appropriate reaction to have during a revolution?



Make a list of the characters and what their purpose is in the novel such as actions characteristics.



Example



OLD MAJOR

-Gets revolution going, inspires hope for change



Snowball is a much more productive leader than Napoleon, as his techniques for votes are usually are based around persuading his audiences on helpful idea while Napoleon tries to persuade his audience against his competitor’s idea. His reaction to the stable-boy’s death is natural, as to snowball he was an enemy who would’ve killed his opponents if given the chance.



Characters (from most to least respected)



Old Major: Gets revolution going, inspires hope for change

Napoleon: In time corrupt leader, less imaginative than Snowball

Snowball: Designs windmill, former leader

Squealer: Persuasive

Boxer: Very productive, high spirited, strong, lacks intellect

Clover: Strong, hard working, caring, friend of Boxer

Minimus: Good song and poem composer

Benjamin: Intelligent and wise but miserable

Mollie: Naive, unproductive

Moses: Raven of Mr. Jones, brings up tale of Sugarcandy Mountain

Mr. Pilkington: Less productive farmer, owner of Foxwood

Mr. Frederick: More productive farmer, owner of Pinchfield

Mr. Jones: Capable farmer, mean to animals





Article posted November 17, 2008 at 03:50 AM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 3071



About the Blogger

My name is Nicole. I am 13 years old and I go to Deer Park School. I really like playing sports and being with my friends.

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