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5A (2013-2014)

by Miss Noshie

teacher: Mrs. B - Grade 5 (2013-2014)

Class Assignments
Blog Entries
5A Empathy Skit 01/21/13
Another Birthday Boy! 03/17/11
Birthday 03/04/11
Science in 5A 03/02/11
Why We Don’t Like Conferencing 02/01/11
A Real Gem 02/01/11
Homework for the Teacher 11/04/10
What’s in a Number? Who invented Place Value? 11/04/10
Deir el Qammar Camping Trip 10/12/10
Technology 06/18/10
Show All
Science Research 05/19/10
Grade 5A 05/19/10
Chasing Colors 04/21/10
Fantastic Work 04/14/10
I Am From 04/13/10
Supercool! 04/03/10
The Red Wheelbarrow 03/26/10
Bonjour 02/28/10
Why Plant a Tree 02/12/10
Our Outdoor Ed trip to Ramliyeh 02/11/10
The Vacuum Cleaner 02/05/10
Impressive Work 01/22/10
Some Things We Did This Week 01/20/10
Good to Be Back 01/08/10
Happy Holiday! 12/23/09
A White Christmas 12/20/09
More Good Stuff From 5A 12/15/09
Miss Noshie’s Favorite Christmas Carol 12/11/09
Elementary Choir Show 12/10/09
Miss Noshie Types 12/03/09
Science Research 12/02/09
Things That Make Me Smile 11/24/09
Another Birthday 11/24/09
Writer's Workshop. 11/12/09
Fire Drill 11/04/09
Just to Show You What Goes On In Class 10/09/09
Yeah! First Birthday of the Year!!! 09/14/09
What Did You Do This Summer? 09/08/09
Finished! Done! 06/18/09
Last Day of School 06/17/09
Get ready for the ACS Elementary Art Show 05/29/09
Birthday Girl 05/26/09
ACS Elementary Field Day 05/20/09
Birthday Boy 04/29/09
Earth Quake Drill 04/25/09
Tree planting 03/31/09
What Did I Do on the Weekend? 03/23/09
Mother's Day 03/20/09
Faqra 03/02/09
Another Birthday Boy 02/20/09
So What Did I Do on the Weekend 02/17/09
Happy Birthday 02/11/09
AUB Museum Field Trip 02/06/09
Ms. Noshie for President? 01/21/09
A Happy 2009 01/08/09
Cave Painters: The Movie 12/03/08
Cave Painting 12/03/08
Fall Is In The Air! 12/01/08
Classroom by the Sea: Paleoantrhopology Field Trip. 11/20/08
Dissection of the Heart 11/04/08
Camping 11/03/08
Halloween Witches 10/31/08
ACS Photography Club 10/30/08
Halloween 10/29/08
Bean Bags 10/21/08
Graphs 10/14/08
Birthdays again! 10/10/08
First Fire Drill (of the Year) 10/09/08
7 Random Facts (by Ms. Noshie) 10/04/08
First Day of the Year 2008 – 2009 09/09/08
Last Post for the Year 2007 - 2008 06/19/08
Cake? What cake? 06/12/08
Another One! But of course! 05/30/08
Celebrate Lebanon 05/30/08
Another Birthday! 05/29/08
Cubby Holes 05/27/08
Monday 05/25/08
New Start 05/19/08
Hope to See You on Monday 05/10/08
A Field Trip 05/07/08
Gardenias 04/25/08
Our Expository Text; Part 3 04/22/08
Expository Essay 04/18/08
HaPpy BiRhtDaY! 04/15/08
Favorite Poems 04/15/08
Graphic Organizers 04/10/08
On Cuneiform and Clay Tablets 04/08/08
The Iditarod Cake 04/03/08
Projects 03/29/08
Just Some Pictures 03/14/08
Some Business 03/04/08
Faqra 02/22/08
Vote for a WINNER! 02/20/08
Computer Lab 02/13/08
Birthday Boys 02/13/08
Hail the hail! 02/13/08
Ali was sick 02/04/08
A Recess in the Life of a Fifth Grader 01/18/08
How About That? 01/18/08
On Tolerance and Oral Book Reports 01/14/08
Enjoy the Holiday 12/18/07
When it Rains, it Pours 12/17/07
Another trip!? 12/06/07
Tree Planting 12/05/07
First Post on My Blog 11/27/07

Article posted January 21, 2013 at 06:13 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 1266

Article posted January 21, 2013 at 06:13 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 1266



Article posted March 17, 2011 at 12:35 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 136

DSC01059

And that was a GOOD cake!!

Article posted March 17, 2011 at 12:35 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 136



Article posted March 4, 2011 at 11:55 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 133

We cannot place a name and a picture of a student in the same post (remember Mrs. B's ;Safety on the Internet' lessons), but since we have a picture of him, we all wish him a very happy birthday. 11 already!!! And the cupcakes were very yummy!!!

Birthday

Article posted March 4, 2011 at 11:55 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 133



Article posted March 2, 2011 at 12:05 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 129

I would like to share some science things we’ve done in class



We were studying the circulatory system. Alaa’s mom brought in a sheep’s heart, complete with lungs, trachea and esophagus, and Ms. Salem shows us how the circulatory system and the circulatory system work together, when she blows into the sheep’s lung.





And here you see in detail how Ms. Salem dissects the lungs and the heart for students of 5A, and 5a students give it a go themselves.



Enjoy!

Article posted March 2, 2011 at 12:05 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 129



Article posted February 1, 2011 at 11:31 AM GMT0 • comment (6) • Reads 169

After every writing assignment, there comes the time when you need to conference with the teacher. You read your piece of writing over with the teacher, and the teacher discussed with you what the strengths are of the piece, and where it needs strengthening (organization, vocabulary, conventions, sentence fluency or ideas).

And then it gets to look like this:

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DSC09969



DSC09968



DSC09967



Oh boy.

Article posted February 1, 2011 at 11:31 AM GMT0 • comment (6) • Reads 169



Article posted February 1, 2011 at 07:59 AM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 179

Correcting assessments is tedious work; the actual teaching is much more fun. But every now and then you get assessments that provide a spark. Such as this one; a math problem solving assessment. This was the problem:



Problem # 1: Basel is starting a summer lawn-mowing business to earn money to buy a new bike. He borrowed $225 from his dad to buy a lawn mower. He charges $35 to mow the average lawn. It costs about $ 0.75 for gasoline for each lawn. That means that his profit from each lawn is $34.25. How many lawns must Basel mow to pay his father back? And if he wants to buy a bike for $500, how many lawns must he mow?



And this, my dear fifth graders and 5th grade parents, was one of the answers. A real gem.



Assessments 



This was the answer page (see up)



Too Busy



And this is what caught my attention.



7 mows too  pay back his father and (he) is too busy to buy a bike.





i.e. He has to mow 7 lawns to pay back his father the $225.




 Personally, was inclined to give this child the full points, because after all, it is totally true. Mowing 22 lawns should take a normal child an awful lot of time. There is no way on Earth he is going to have time to bike, let alone buy a bike. Besides, what Lebanese child knows how to mow a lawn? Who has lawns in Lebanon? And even if you do, does your dad let you mow the lawn? No, too dangerous, would be the argument, you could cut yourself. And $225 for a lawn mower? If it is a mechanical mower, you got seriously swindled (cheated, short-changed). If it is an electrical one, I doubt it would even function for a mere $225. 



Unfortunately, we (the grade 5 teacher) decided not to give him the point, for the simple fact that it might entice students in the future to come up with more of these ‘smart’ answers, in order to avoid doing the calculations, to save time, or in order to cover up possible comprehension problems, and that would defeat our purpose of teaching them how to solve complex and multi-step problems.



Still, it is a gem, and I wanted to share it with you. It made me smile.  I hope it made you smile too.


Article posted February 1, 2011 at 07:59 AM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 179



Article posted November 4, 2010 at 02:28 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 127

Tired of doing homework every single day? Fed up with those dumb number lines? How about you give your teacher some of those assignments. And that’s what students from 5a did. Here they are.



Math Work

You can also see them up close on their individual blogs.

Article posted November 4, 2010 at 02:28 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 127



Article posted November 4, 2010 at 11:38 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 329

Grade 5 students are right now learning about place value in math. But what is place value? And who invented it anyway? And why?



The Arabs? Well, there is some discussion about that. In general it is said that the Hindus (from India) invented the system, and the Arabs introduced it to Western Europe.



It is uncertain when the zero was invented, but a similar (like) symbol was in existence by 500 BC (that’s some 2,500 years ago). The inventor of the zero symbol is unknown. Before its invention, Indian mathematicians had already taken to leaving an empty column on their counting boards and clearly at some point this empty space was filled.



In those days, many Arab travelers came to India to trade. They saw the system and thought “Hey, now that’s a smart thing to do”, and took the idea, complete with the Hindu method of writing numerals, to Baghdad. Baghdad was then part of the Arab empire, and pretty soon all scholars (educated people) were using it.



Why? Because it was much more logic than the systems they were using at the time. Arabic scholars during this time improved the system by introducing decimal fractions.



The system than slowly spread to Europe. Many mathematical books from the Greeks and Hindus were translated in Baghdad and were then sold in Europe.



Those ten marks (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9) are also known as the Arabic numerals; for it was the Arabs who introduced them into Europe.

So the Europeans are using the Arabic numerals, and the Arabs are now using the Hindi numerals. How about that?



You want to hear a rap about place value? Go to Mrs. B's blog!!! [LINK]

Article posted November 4, 2010 at 11:38 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 329



Article posted October 12, 2010 at 06:44 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 147

Sit back and relax. This might take some time.





 

Article posted October 12, 2010 at 06:44 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 147



Article posted June 18, 2010 at 01:41 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 131

Sorry you guys did not make it into the Grade 5 Celebration Program, but we thought it would be even more appropriate that we would send your technology projects into cyber space!!! So now the entire world can see it!

Great job!!!



Great job!!!



Article posted June 18, 2010 at 01:41 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 131



Article posted May 19, 2010 at 02:07 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 210

A couple of weeks we started with a science research on a disease in the nervous or the cardiovascular system.

















 



 Here are some of the results that I have in.



Polio


Autism


Bell's Palsey


Mitral Valve Prolapse

Article posted May 19, 2010 at 02:07 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 210



Article posted May 19, 2010 at 01:47 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 113















 



 

Article posted May 19, 2010 at 01:47 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 113



Article posted April 21, 2010 at 07:16 AM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 170

How does a morning walk to school

Writers Workshop



turn into a Writers' Workshop,

Writers Workshop Poem



and then into a poem?



like this.

Article posted April 21, 2010 at 07:16 AM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 170



Article posted April 14, 2010 at 01:36 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 107

I just have to share this work with you, as this makes me a very proud teacher. April is the month of Poetry (at ACS), and my students have churned out some fantastic work already!!


Here are two publications they have worked on so far:



The Red Wheelbarrow (First Issue)





The Red Wheelbarrow (
Second Issue)



Enjoy!!

Article posted April 14, 2010 at 01:36 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 107



Article posted April 13, 2010 at 11:58 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 105

I Am From


 


I am from the sound of humming lawn mowers in the park, signaling the coming of summer. I am from the smell of dry grass, from tiles with green moss, and a garage door with safety glass.


 


I am from the smell of apple pies that never succeeded, and I never ate. From the green tiles in the kitchen and the alarm at the bottom of the wooden stairs, signaling dinner time.


 


I am from the smell of wet wood in my grandmother’s bathroom, the chimes of church bells every 15 minutes in the dark night, and sleep-overs with cousins I did not really know.


 


I am from cornflakes only at grandma’s house, from caring about one single cent, and wooden parquet, a piano that only she could play, and the ostrich egg on the shelf.


 


I am from 100 chewing gum balls for a guilder, playing in the back street where children come out of porches at night. I am from “Hello, I’m home”, and “What did you do at school today?” 


 


I am from a best friend with a similar name, from laughing over trees planted at National Tree Planting Days and bicycling to the library in rows of two. I am from Holland


 


Where Are You From?

Article posted April 13, 2010 at 11:58 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 105



Article posted April 3, 2010 at 11:50 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 127

I went out to the Farmer’s Market today (Souq el-Tayeb) downtown, and guess who I met? A real author and illustrator! I met Joumana Medlej. She has illustrated many books, but you may know her as the author and illustrator of the only Lebanese graphic novel super hero we have: Malaak.


 


Meeting the inventor of the first Lebanese superhero is supercool! Actually, Malaak is a heroine (female version of a hero) .


 


You may have met her Mom last year when you were in grade 4, and the librarians organized a ‘How Do You Write a Book?” meeting during I Love to Read Week.  Her name is Youmna Jazzar Medlej, and she has written a series of childrens books (see examples )


She came to ACS and explained the very long process of writing and publishing a book.


If you don’t remember that event, than surely you remember that in the beginning of the year, when we were studying landforms, Makram brought in this book to share during Morning meeting about caves. It explained all about limestone and carbonic acid, and how Jeita cave was formed. Well, that one was one of the series.


 


Joumana , her daughter, is a graphic designer and writer who graduated from AUB, and she has illustrated all her mom’s books, but what’s more, she has also written her own books. Malaak , the superhero (or heroine, actually, which is the female version of hero), is one of them.  


 


I was very excited to meet her for several reasons;


First of all, to meet a real author and illustrator. Here are examples of some of her illustrations.


Secondly, she is Lebanese and thinks with a Lebanese schema, yet she writes in English, so you can read her work. Now think about that when you are about to write your second realistic fiction piece; her settings are totally Lebanese! That is something else than to wrestle your way through the Arabic reading books in the classroom. I think it is exciting to see that you can write excellent English fiction while using your own background.


And finally, she is using a medium that is one of my favorites; the graphic novel. We don’t have a lot of graphic novels in the classroom library, and almost none at all in elementary library.


 




So I bought the whole series of Malaak for the classroom, and she wrote a dedication to you all. Here you can read more about her amazing creator.


 


So if you don’t know what to do this spring break; drag your parents over to the Farmer’s Market on Saturday morning, and meet the author/illustrator yourself, buy her books, and have them dedicated to you!

Article posted April 3, 2010 at 11:50 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 127



Article posted March 26, 2010 at 10:06 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 97

 



We are currently reading Love that Dog (level T), as a classroom novel,


 written by Sharon Creech. Love that Dog is a great novel to introduce


a wide variety of poetry to students. One of the poems is The Red Wheelbarrow .


 


The Red Wheelbarrow


so much depends


upon


 a red wheel


barrow


 glazed with rain


water


 beside the white


chickens


 


 The poem is so short; it is just one sentence of 16 words. It shows that a


 poet has to choose words very carefully in order to create an image. It


follows a very tight syllable system. It contains no capital letters, another


feature of some forms of poetry.  Carlos Williams chose everyday


subjects.


 


And although the poem was not written for children, it is amazing to see


 what children understand from poetry, and how it inspires them to write


 their own poetry. The 5A students were asked to think of a moment that


 was very vivid in their  memory. They had to try and ‘paint’ with words


that moment, trying to use the same verse pattern as WCW had used.


 They did not have to explain the moment, the poem would explain itself.


 And these are the results. I hope you will enjoy them, because I did.


 


So here's a selection of my students' poetry, inspired by William Carlos


William’s ‘The Red Wheelbarrow’.


 The Grand Piano


By AH


 


so much depends


upon


a black grand


piano


polished with clean


water


beside a silent


crowd


 


Standing on Stage


Written by EB


 


so much depends      


upon


standing on stage


singing


in front of an


audience


and being the


best


 


 Inspiration


Written by WS


 


so much depends


upon


a little poem


inspired


by William Carlos


William


the great rhythmic


poet


 


Class


Written by MK


 


so much depends


upon


a very quiet


class


with an angry


teacher


beside the principal’s


office


 


Street


Written by AC


 


so much depends


upon


a lousy busy


street


filled with honking


sounds


through the tall


buildings


 


The Fried Chicken


Written by OZ


 


so much depends


upon


a crispy fried


chicken


covered with hot


gravy


served on a


plate


 


A Lamp


Written by HC


 


so much depends


upon


a lamp that


shines


lightening up the


dark


enlightening my heart


warmly


 


Fried Chicken


Written by AF


 


so much depends


upon


a deep fried


chicken


covered with hot


sauce


served with rice


pudding


 


Home Work


Written by RH


 


so much depends


upon


me doing my


homework


and not flunking


it


so I don’t


repeat


 


Cabbage


Written by MHM


 


so much depends


upon


a head of


cabbage


when someone is


hungry


just like I


am 


 


The Red Lipstick


Written by LW


 


so much depends


upon


the stick of


lipstick


without a cap


on


beside the black


glasses


 


Gum Chewing


Written by May


 


so much depends


upon


chewing gum with


you


through day and


night


on T.V. or


not


 


The Rabbit   


Written by MA


 


so much depends


upon


a small white


rabbit


struggling to escape


from


the enormous white


cage


  

Article posted March 26, 2010 at 10:06 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 97



Article posted February 28, 2010 at 09:02 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 101

Remember that French session we had in the computer lab? Well, it is on Voices of the World now. Check here (second voki). We don’t sound so bad, do we?!!

Article posted February 28, 2010 at 09:02 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 101



Article posted February 12, 2010 at 01:16 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 185

So what is the importance of planting your own tree? Leave aside the obvious reasons such as the environment, and taking care & responsibility of your own country. How about the memories?



Here is one of Ms. Noshie’s most vivid memories of her elementary school years. When I was young (yes, last year) I lived in Holland. And in Holland we have something called the International Tree Planting Project. One day a year, every child of every elementary school, public and private, goes out with his/her fellow students, and plants a tree. They usually do this in the neighborhood of their school, or village, so that when they grow up, they can also see ‘their’ tree grow up. It creates a type of ownership, so to speak. And I remember so vividly, one of those years, when in grade 3, my school was given a plot of grassland next to the river to plant that year’s trees. The municipality was there with their people, the workers, to help us dig the holes. And each group of children was given a few trees to plant. I was with my very best friend - we were kind of like Siamese twins for 6 years – and we were given a bunch of sticks. They didn’t look much like trees. Actually, they looked like branches. And we thought that they had given us one tree. So we proudly dug our holes, placed the ‘tree’ in it, and went proudly to the teacher to show our fantastic work. The teacher was quite amused. The municipality worker was even more amused. “Well, you ladies probably should not try a career in the forestry business.” It turned out we had placed seven trees all together in one hole. My very best friend and I thought this was hilarious, and we couldn’t stop laughing for the rest of the tree planting trip. And up to this day, I remember that moment. And very year, when I go back to my hometown, and I bike past that little plot of grassland, I am reminded of that moment. It is no longer grass, but it has become a wooded area next to the river. A perfect place for people to sit on a wooden bench, and see the water flow by, and the ducks. And every year I am reminded of the fact that within that little forest, seven of the trees are planted by me.

















 



 



That is the power of planting trees. And so for you, a little slide show.

Article posted February 12, 2010 at 01:16 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 185



Article posted February 11, 2010 at 08:45 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 111















 



 

Article posted February 11, 2010 at 08:45 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 111



Article posted February 5, 2010 at 11:44 AM GMT0 • comment (3) • Reads 179

Dear parents,

You obviously spoil your children! When a simple chore like this – yes, you see that right; vacuum cleaning – gives them so much pleasure that they actually walk out of a PE session in order to be able to vacuum the floor of the PE room, well then, you obviously do not give them enough to do at home.

You should have seen their faces; what joy.

DSC00962

So my suggestion for the weekend is, now that they have to earn their $7 anyway, to get the vacuum cleaner out, and have them vacuum the house from top to bottom!



On another note, I suggest you check your child’s blog to see their science report (the one you signed off for yesterday) in color.

Article posted February 5, 2010 at 11:44 AM GMT0 • comment (3) • Reads 179



Article posted January 22, 2010 at 10:39 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 138

Remember this science research they were working on? Well, last Friday was the deadline, and this is what I got in. Pretty impressive. If I may say so myself. If you click here, you get the chance to see each project in detail.




Some of the things your child does in class are simply amazing. A lot of the skills we teach them, in order to enable them to do such amazing things, don’t really show until much later in life. This may look like a simple science project, but is actually a shared language arts & technology project on the formation of a particular type of landform.


 


This project involves the following skills:


 


Science : Standards: 1) Know that smaller rocks come from the breakage and weathering of bedrock and layer rocks, 2) Describe how wind and water shape the earth’s surface (Processes of erosion and deposits) and 3) Know how features of the Earth‘s surface are constantly changed by a combination of slow and rapid processes (weathering, erosion, deposition, landslides, volcanic eruptions, earthquakes and tectonic plate movement)


Knowledge: 1) Distinguish between erosion and deposition, 2) Describe how water, ice, waves and wind change landforms, 3) Explain the theory of continental drift/plate tectonics, 4)Describe how features of earth’s surface have changed over millions of years, 5) Use effective communication strategies, and tools to present science information and 6) Make effective use of diagrams in order to express a process/idea.


Language Arts: Writing: 1) Write expository text (main ideas & supporting details) & Word origins (Etymology)


Library: 1) Research skills (books & encyclopedias). 2) Note taking (Trash & Treasure) and 3) Writing a bibliography (issues with plagiarism)


Technology& Computer: Alpha Smart (Typing and downloading text onto computer)


Keyboarding


Microsoft Word: 1) Formatting (Copy & paste, Justifying/Center, Bold etc). 2) Inserting pictures from file, 3) Drawing (Text boxes), 4) Word Art  and 5) Tools (Spell check)


Internet: 1) Locating pictures, 2) Copying pictures & picture links, 3) Location information, 4) Copying web site links, 5) Navigating the Network Drive and 6) Saving to and retrieving files from the shared folder .


Global Communication: Article posted to Grade 5 blog


 


And so this is the result. Pretty amazing, no?

Article posted January 22, 2010 at 10:39 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 138



Article posted January 20, 2010 at 12:03 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 109

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We visited the AUB Archeological Museum, and had a real paleoanthropologist show us the Paleolithic collection of the region.



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While on our way to the museum, we passed this enormous Banyan tree that grows on the campus. From Wikipedia: ‘Older banyan trees are characterized by their aerial prop roots which grow into thick woody trunks which, with age, can become indistinguishable from the main trunk. Old trees can spread out laterally using these prop roots to cover a wide area.’



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We also tried to figure out what the elements of a culture are, and had to organize them in groups.

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And we learned that four heads think better (faster as well) than one.



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This was the result.



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And we learned how to organize a persuasive essay or letter. More on that later.



And these were some of the things we did this week.

Article posted January 20, 2010 at 12:03 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 109



Article posted January 8, 2010 at 10:21 AM GMT0 • comment (3) • Reads 116

It’s good to be back again. All my students were present; always a good sign. And today, on the roof, while on roof duty – I was happy to see that our Argue Ball is progressing quite nicely as well.



Argue Ball 1



This is – by the way – what the game is supposed to look like.



Argue Ball

Article posted January 8, 2010 at 10:21 AM GMT0 • comment (3) • Reads 116



Article posted December 23, 2009 at 10:54 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 92

I would like to share a letter with you; a letter I received this morning from one of my students. The reason why I want to share it with you is because I absolutely loved it. And as far as the maturity issue goes (read bottom of the letter); I think this letter clearly shows that this student has all the maturity within in him that he needs in life. :) Great letter!









I hope you are having a wonderful vacation away from all the little annoying troubles of life like my friends and I. I have finished the book you have assigned for me in only 4 1/2 hours and I am bored out of my head because I have nothing to do. My sister says hi and wishes you a merry Christmas and so does my little sister who is exited to be with you (discipline her allot because she has to work on her behavior). My mom is still so happy about me ending up with you, she thinks that by the end of the year I will let go of my childish shenanigans and become mature (it might not happen). I hope you and your family are happy this vacation.

Article posted December 23, 2009 at 10:54 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 92



Article posted December 20, 2009 at 09:42 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 94

I wish you all a wonderful winter break, and for those that celebrate Christmas; I wish your Christmas will be as white as mine!!!!



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Article posted December 20, 2009 at 09:42 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 94



Article posted December 15, 2009 at 12:45 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 117

Yes, another ‘Day in the Life of …..” Today, we had an integrated social studies (paleoanthropology & stone tool making), science (geology, sedimentary rock) and outdoor education field trip. You do not really have to go very far in Lebanon to get to some amazing stuff. Enjoy!

















 



 



 

Article posted December 15, 2009 at 12:45 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 117



Article posted December 11, 2009 at 09:32 AM GMT0 • comment (2) • Reads 185

"Carol of the Bells" (also known as the "Ukrainian Bell Carol") is composed by the Ukrainian composer Leontovych. "The Carol of The Bells" was first sung in December 1916 by a group of students at Kiev University. The original Ukranian text tells the tale of a swallow flying into a household to proclaim the plentiful and bountiful year that the family will have. In Ukraine, the carol is currently sung on the eve of the Julian New Year (which is January the 13th). It was later adapted into English language version by Peter Wilhousky in the 1930s. (Source: [LINK])







Here it is sung by the ACS Elementary Choir and the Advanced Choir Group on December 10, 2009 for the parents. And personally, Miss Noshie thinks that they should sing this again for the entire elementary school. A fantastic way to start the Winter Break!

Sing along;



Hark! how the bells

Sweet silver bells

All seem to say,

"Throw cares away."

Christmas is here

Bringing good cheer

To young and old

Meek and the bold



Ding, dong, ding, dong

That is their song

With joyful ring

All caroling

One seems to hear

Words of good cheer

From ev'rywhere

Filling the air



Oh how they pound,

Raising the sound,

O'er hill and dale,

Telling their tale,

Gaily they ring

While people sing

Songs of good cheer

Christmas is here

Merry, merry, merry, merry Christmas

Merry, merry, merry, merry Christmas



On, on they send

On without end

Their joyful tone

To ev'ry home



Ding, dong, ding, dong.



Article posted December 11, 2009 at 09:32 AM GMT0 • comment (2) • Reads 185



Article posted December 10, 2009 at 06:35 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 98

Ms Yara

Wow! What else can I say but WOW! You should have seen it. You should have heard it. You should have been there! The Elementary & Advanced Choir Presentation, yesterday, in the High School Auditorium. It was AWESOME!

ACS Elementary Choir



And although it’s all Miss Yara’s work (and the students of course), 6 of the choir members are mine!

So from a very proud teacher, a big Thank You, for such a fantastic show! Way to go!!!

I gave them a partial exemption from their homework, but I think I will go for a full exemption!

A Movie is following shortly!

Article posted December 10, 2009 at 06:35 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 98



Article posted December 3, 2009 at 02:17 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 97

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Article posted December 3, 2009 at 02:17 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 97



Article posted December 2, 2009 at 12:22 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 116

Another ‘Day in the Life of a Fifth Grader’ post. Today we started our science research. That is early in the year; usually we do not start a library research until March, but this year, the students seemed well prepared for some research time & expository writing.

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And so I’d like to share some library pictures with you, to show you what we did this morning from 8:00 – 10:00. Most students will now have enough information to write their science report on a landform.



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For a slide show (and more pictures) click on this link .

Article posted December 2, 2009 at 12:22 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 116



Article posted November 25, 2009 at 05:51 AM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 103

I just couldn't resist this one: a quote I heard from MHM this morning:


“Yesterday’s tomorrow is always today!”

Article posted November 25, 2009 at 05:51 AM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 103



Article posted November 24, 2009 at 12:01 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 75

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This little munchkin had his 11th birthday today; and look at the pieces of cake he cut us!  Where are all the girls, you are wondering? Well, they’re being girly somewhere else.



 


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Article posted November 24, 2009 at 12:01 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 75



Article posted November 12, 2009 at 11:04 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 85















 



 



You've seen what a Writers Workshop may look like. Interested what a Writers Workshop is? Go here: http://www.learn.niu.edu/flash/ProjectREAL/writing_workshop.swf

Article posted November 12, 2009 at 11:04 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 85



Article posted November 4, 2009 at 01:38 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 92

“So, what did you do today?” you ask your child. “Oh, we got stuck for an hour at the AUB parking lot?” ‘Huh?’ you’re thinking. What’s going on in that class? Well,This is what happened to us today during Writer's Workshop. We had a fire drill.

















 



 

Article posted November 4, 2009 at 01:38 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 92



Article posted October 9, 2009 at 04:52 PM GMT0 • comment (2) • Reads 86

Reader 1

What’s happening in this class, you wonder? What are these kids doing?

Reader 2

Why are they in these odd positions? Are they practicing for a dramatic performance? Are they the extra’s for an upcoming war movie?

Reader 3

A sudden attack of swine flue maybe?

Nooooo! They’re reading! Every day, we have Readers Workshop, which involves half an hour of uninterrupted reading on their level. And this is how your children prefer to read.

Reader 4

How can they even read like that, you probably wonder? Well, I do the same. I am looking at them, and I go “Ouch!” But believe me, they do read. Without a sound. I have one student that walks up and down while reading. Continuously.

Personally, I’m much more amazed with the fact that after half an hour in this odd position they manage to get up without a problem. I need about half an hour to recover from painful joints and the likes if I sit like that.

What’s the reason for this post? Just to let you see what goes on in your child’s class now and then.

Article posted October 9, 2009 at 04:52 PM GMT0 • comment (2) • Reads 86



Article posted September 14, 2009 at 11:35 AM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 82

What can I say? The year hasn’t even started yet, and we’ve got a birthday!



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And this lady (remember, if you’re under 16, we cannot show your picture AND your name on the same page) brought in the most delicious – and homemade – chocolate cupcakes. HAPPY BIRTHDAY to her.

This was one of the cupcakes before,

Birthday  2

and this was that same cupcake after.

Birthday 1

And what do you think of Ms. Branch’s new wheels? (Ms. Branch is older than 16, so I can use her picture and full name together). Isn’t her car beautiful?

Ms. Branch and her car

Article posted September 14, 2009 at 11:35 AM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 82



Article posted September 8, 2009 at 10:30 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 82

This is Mrs. Noshie's view this summer; she saw 3 donkeys, one of her brothers, a friend, her father and her children against this spectacular backdrop!

Ms. Noshie's summer



So what did you see this summer? Share your pictures with me!

Article posted September 8, 2009 at 10:30 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 82



Article posted June 18, 2009 at 10:36 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 108

And yes! You've done it, summer is finally here.

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The whole class (although I seem to be missing two students. .......)

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And the girls, who look like angles, but who are, I can assure you, not. :)

Have a great summer!

Article posted June 18, 2009 at 10:36 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 108



Article posted June 17, 2009 at 12:25 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 109

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Yes, the time has come; this was YOUR LAST DAY in elementary school. And so Ms. Ghantous, our room mom, threw a party. And what kind of party! It was so good, the entire grade 5 showed up.

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We would like to thank our room mom for being such a wonderful room mom DSC04047

to us this year. She did a great job!

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What can I say? Tomorrow you graduate, and I hope you will think about this last day in school now and then.

I’ll see you all tomorrow!

Article posted June 17, 2009 at 12:25 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 109



Article posted May 29, 2009 at 01:08 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 95

What a grand and glorious . . . . drawings I encountered on my way back from the auditorium today from our multi-cultural dance and song.

5A Art work

These are just some of the works that were hanging there; Ms. Tala was still getting everything ready for the ACS Elementary Art Show. Make sure your parents come and visit your work. I’ve uploaded it to Flickr, so if you click on the picture, you can see (and download) your own work individually as well.

Article posted May 29, 2009 at 01:08 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 95



Article posted May 26, 2009 at 12:40 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 80

A birthday!

Birthday Girl

Did you know that Mrs. B once told me that her son never eats birthday cake, because every time someone blows out the candle, they basically spray the entire cake with tiny droplets of spit? And that’s why he passes when they ask “want a piece of cake?”

Ms. Noshie has no problem with that; Sprayed cake or not, she’ll celebrate. And a delicious cake it was!



And this was the birthday of our newly 11th year old girl, who broke her leg over the winter, and now happily hops through school.



Article posted May 26, 2009 at 12:40 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 80



Article posted May 20, 2009 at 10:35 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 92

Finally some field day photos! I had fun. Not much more to say about it, I think your faces speak for themselves.

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Lovely ladies and their Arabic teacher.

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Uuhh, let me gues; Purple team, right?

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Yes, I am teaching these. Do I get a bonus for that? :)

Article posted May 20, 2009 at 10:35 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 92



Article posted April 29, 2009 at 06:54 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 81

Look what this birthday boy brought in!? Miss Noshie's favortie cake; the spiky chocolate one. And how old is he now? 11!

Birthday Boy

Happy Birthday!!!!!!

Article posted April 29, 2009 at 06:54 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 81



Article posted April 25, 2009 at 07:05 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 93

What is this? Students cowering away from the brunt of an overworked teacher? No, of course not. We had a hands-on lesson!

fire drill

As we are studying plate tectonics, and the geology of Lebanon, and how the Theory of Continental Drift explains why we experience earthquakes and tremors in Lebanon (we’re right on the edge of the Arabian plate, which is a transform boundary, yes yes), there was a school wide earthquake drill. How very appropriate.

And so here we sit, against a supporting wall, away from windows and furniture, hands above our head to protect it from ceiling tiles coming down, waiting till we get the signal to evacuate the school.

We did quite well.

Article posted April 25, 2009 at 07:05 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 93



Article posted March 31, 2009 at 10:46 AM GMT0 • comment (2) • Reads 99

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Last week, you (supposedly) were doing chores in the house which enabled you to earn a dollar a day. With the 7 dollars earned, the fifth graders bought a total of 425 trees, which they planted themselves (well, almost) in Deir el-Qammar, a village in the mountains above Beirut. And so they bought and planted trees themselves.

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I (Ms. Noshie) have a text-to-self connection, which I will share with you here.

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In Holland, where I am from, we have an annual ‘Plant-a-Tree-Day’. On that day, all elementary students go out into their village or city, and plant trees. They do this in cooperation with either the municipality (if the live in an urban area), or with the Forestry Service (if they live in a rural area). I remember one of those days quite vividly. I was 9 years old, and in grade 4. I lived in an urban area, and so the workers of the municipality took us to a piece of land next to the river that ran alongside my village. It was there that they had prepared holes for the children to plant their trees.

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I was with my best friend, Titia (tee-chi-a), and one of the workers gave us –what to us looked like – a bunch of sticks. And so we put all these sticks together in a hole and filled it up.

“There, we are done,” we called out, so they could give us a little orange ruler that we were promised for our work.

One of the workers came by, and said “Tseh tseh tseh ladies, we do not put several trees in one hole. Every tree gets it own hole,” and he pulled all our sticks out.

“Oh, each stick is a tree?” we asked in surprise.

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Little did we know, but we almost peed our pants laughing, because we felt so stupid sticking all the trees into one hole. What made us laugh even more is that we realized we were dumb, and that was the funniest part of all.

And every time I am in my hometown in Holland, and I walk by that piece of land (which now has become a forest!), I remember that day, when my best friend and I laughed our heads off for being so dumb. And I still have the little orange ruler.

Maybe one day, when you drive by that village, you will remember your ‘plant-a-Tree-Day’

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Article posted March 31, 2009 at 10:46 AM GMT0 • comment (2) • Reads 99



Article posted March 23, 2009 at 07:58 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 79

I go out EVERY SINGLE weekend, come rain or shine. I simply do not understand how your parents can stand staying in Beirut all week long, and then on the weekend as well. I usually visit some place in Lebanon on a Saturday, or on a Sunday, and if I am lucky, I get to go both days!



This weekend I had work on Saturday, but on Sunday I went on a picnic in an olive grove up North. It was an absolutely gorgeous sunny day! I was surrounded by hundreds and hundreds of olive trees, and wild flowers. We had our picnic in between the flowers and the trees. My children played soccer, climbed trees, ran with the dogs, picked flowers and learned the names of four of them (buttercups, daisies, lemongrass and clover), hid in the grass, went off-road with a bicycle, walked in mud and chased the free-range pigs. Free-range pigs are pigs that are not confined to a pen, but are allowed to walk free in between the olive trees and the oak forest, where they dig for acorns (Pigs adore acorns), until the times comes to turn them into pork chops. This is an area where some farmers let their pigs run free.



I was a bit worried about the pigs. I am used to pigs, as we have them in our country, and I know they can have a really mean bite. They’re not docile like cows, for instance. But my children are not used to pigs, and they think all farm animals are nice. I could just picture my daughter being gobbled up by a mean porker. However, these pigs were not that domesticated, and were afraid of us, so they chased them off the olive grove pretty fast.



On the way back home I got stuck in a massive traffic jam. We rolled down the windows, played really loud rap music, and made the car bounce up an down. My children wish my car had hydraulics, so it would bounce up and down all by itself. When we got home, everyone rolled right into their beds, muddy and smelly and all. Just like the pigs. What a lovely feeling.



Really, you should tell your parents to be a little more adventurous and go out into the country on the weekend. There is so much to see in this lovely country! (I’ll post some pictures of this day soon)



Article posted March 23, 2009 at 07:58 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 79



Article posted March 20, 2009 at 01:24 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 94

A wonderful poem for Mother’s Day came from Mrs. Bashour, and that’s what I am going to do when I grow old. I hope you are nice to your parents, or they may do the same.



When I'm an old lady, I'll live with each kid,

And bring so much happiness...just as they did.

I want to pay back all the joy they've provided.

Returning each deed! Oh, they'll be so excited!

(When I'm an old lady and live with my kids)



I'll write on the wall with reds, whites and blues,

And I'll bounce on the furniture...wearing my shoes.

I'll drink from the carton and then leave it out.

I'll stuff all the toilets and oh, how they'll shout!

(When I'm an old lady and live with my kids)



When they're on the phone and just out of reach,

I'll get into things like sugar and bleach.

Oh, they'll snap their fingers and then shake their head,

(When I'm an old lady and live with my kids)



When they cook dinner and call me to eat,

I'll not eat my green beans or salad or meat,

I'll gag on my okra, spill milk on the table,

And when they get angry...I'll run....if I'm able!

(When I'm an old lady and live with my kids)



I'll sit close to the TV, through the channels I'll click,

I'll cross both eyes just to see if they stick.

I'll take off my socks and throw one away,

And play in the mud 'til the end of the day!

(When I'm an old lady and live with my kids)



And later in bed, I'll lay back and sigh,

I'll thank God in prayer and then close my eyes.

My kids will look down with a smile slowly creeping,

And say with a groan, "She's so sweet when she's sleeping!"





And another one to show our appreciation for Moms all around the world. Show this one to your mom, I am sure she will recognize it.



Article posted March 20, 2009 at 01:24 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 94



Article posted March 2, 2009 at 11:58 AM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 81

The Faqra video is out! It will probably take you 3 hours to load the thing, sorry about that.





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Article posted March 2, 2009 at 11:58 AM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 81



Article posted February 20, 2009 at 09:58 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 68

Here's another birthday Boy! And another yummy cake! Keep 'em coming.

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Article posted February 20, 2009 at 09:58 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 68



Article posted February 17, 2009 at 06:17 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 91

Remember I told you I went for a picnic in the rain over the weekend? Well, I also learned a new trick in the Photoshop program. I did have to wrestle my way through a 27-page manual, but it was well worth it, because I learned something new! Check this out.

Rainy Picnic in Janne, Lebanon



Doesn't it totally rock?

Article posted February 17, 2009 at 06:17 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 91



Article posted February 11, 2009 at 12:37 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 76

And yes, we have a birthday! To be quite honest, we’ve had two birthdays in between of which I totally failed to make a picture! Bad bad Miss Noshie. That’s why I’ll try harder from now on. Happy Birthday, birthday boy (cannot name his name AND post his picture too!)

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Article posted February 11, 2009 at 12:37 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 76



Article posted February 6, 2009 at 11:32 AM GMT0 • comment (2) • Reads 85

I haven't blogged for a while, and to break the radio silence, I post some pictures of our AUB Museum Field Trip.

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On our way to the museum, we pass these trees with awesome roots. I mean, just check this out; regular Tarzan stuff! This is ONE tree! You’d think we live in the jungle. But no, Lebanon is actually classified as a desert. Go figure that one out.

We got a tour from a real paleoanthropologist/archeologist about early ancestors. DSC01035

Can anyone explain to me why all the paleoanthropologists in Lebanon are French educated? I think the next paleoanthropologist should be an ACS graduate. Anyone up for the job?

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The AUB museum has lots of stone tools and fossils.

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And good examples of how archeologists dig. Here’s one of stratigraphy. Remember the oldest layer is the bottom one.

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In front of the museum.

Article posted February 6, 2009 at 11:32 AM GMT0 • comment (2) • Reads 85



Article posted January 21, 2009 at 06:37 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 93

I assume you have all seen this poster. It was on the cover of Time magazine (Picture source).



 TIME PERSON OF YEAR



 



The fact that I put him on my blog does not mean I voted for Barack Obama. Actually, I am Dutch, and was therefore not allowed to participate in the American presidential elections. Had I been American, I would have voted, but I would not have told you who I voted for. That’s private information, I think.



The reason why I put this poster is because in a very short time, this poster has become very famous. It was made by Shephard Fairy (read more about the artist here)



And this January, the 'HOPE' image (as they call the poster) was acquired by the US National Portrait Gallery , and became part of the permanent collection.  It was unveiled and put on display at the Gallery on January 17, 2009. The National Portrait Gallery is an art gallery in Washington, D.C: Its collections focus on images of famous individual Americans.



And why do I tell you all this? Because you can ‘Obamanize” yourself too with this little gadget . I think it will be fun for you to do at home.





Look, this is me! I’m afraid you are not allowed to put your picture on your blog (you are not 16 yet). But you can print it out and hang it on your door!

Article posted January 21, 2009 at 06:37 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 93



Article posted January 8, 2009 at 07:38 AM GMT0 • comment (3) • Reads 94

A very happy New Year to all of you! I wish that you may be successful this year. What did I do over the break? I RELAXED!
My daughter got herself a pair of rollerblades from her cousin and so now we must rollerblade. Beirut is a pretty big city, with very little space for kids. But the Corniche in West Beirut is the one place where you can rollerblade your heart out.

The word corniche comes from the French route à corniche or road on a ledge. The word corniche typically refers to a road on the side of a cliff or mountain, with the ground rising on one side of the road and falling away on the other.The word also, in the Arabic language, refers, in general, to a headland formed at land's end, which describes a most remote geographical border of a mainland by a water line, with a natural corner, usually, or a cliff. In Lebanon and Egypt, the word typically describes a waterfront promenade usually paralleled by a main road, such as the renowned, Corniche Beirut. (source)

And so she rolled,
and rolled,
and rolled some more.
When night had fallen, she finally decided it had been enough. Time to go home.


Article posted January 8, 2009 at 07:38 AM GMT0 • comment (3) • Reads 94



Article posted December 3, 2008 at 11:42 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 81

Now playing on a theater near you:



Article posted December 3, 2008 at 11:42 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 81



Article posted December 3, 2008 at 08:55 AM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 74

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Soon to come: our Cave Painting Experience!

Article posted December 3, 2008 at 08:55 AM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 74



Article posted December 1, 2008 at 06:14 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 94

It’s fall, and the Beqaa Valley was absolutely teeming with colors.

The Beqaa is a fertile valley in Lebanon, located about 30 km (19 miles) east of Beirut. The valley is situated between the Mount Lebanon to the west and the Anti-Lebanon mountain ranges to the east. It forms the northeastern extension of the Great Rift Valley, which stretches from Syria through the Red Sea into Africa. Beqaa Valley is about 120 km (about 75 miles) in length and has an average width of about 16 km (about 10 miles). (Source)



Article posted December 1, 2008 at 06:14 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 94



Article posted November 20, 2008 at 12:07 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 107

Early humans didn’t have much brain to come up with intricate tools, and then when they were ready to make tools, there just werent’t a whole lot of materials to work with. There was stone, wood and bone, and that was just about it.



Luckily they discovered that a specific type of stone, flint stone, was easy to knap (to chip or flake), and gave razor sharp edges. With these sharp stones, you could cut through hides of animals. If you knapped it a little blunt, you could create hand axes, diggers and scrapers.



Flint stone is usually found in nodules (balls) encased in limestone. Well, In Lebanon we have plenty of lime stone, and on the coast, near Rauche, we have a lot of layers where you can see those nodules of dark brown lime stone jutting out.



And so we went on a stone tool making field trip. What did we learn? These early humans may have looked like apes, and sounded likes apes, but they sure were smarter at stone tool making than a couple of fifth graders are. It is not so easy at all!



Enjoy the pictures

25

3

18

20

15

7

28

29

Article posted November 20, 2008 at 12:07 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 107



Article posted November 4, 2008 at 10:53 AM GMT0 • comment (5) • Reads 102

Another activity, organized by Ms. Salem of 5C. She bought the heart and lungs - complete with the trachea - of a sheep, and dissected it in front of the students to show the parts of the circulatory system.



Heart & Lungs



She explained how the lungs expand as you inhale,

Inhale

and showed us how expanded lungs look like by inflating them. She had to keep her fingers on several holes in the trachea (just like with a recorder) otherwise she couldn’t fill the lungs with air.

Inflating the lungs



Then she separated the lungs from the heart. She showed us that the heart really doesn’t look as clean and smooth as we have seen on the pictures. It is surrounded by quite some fatty tissue.

Fatty tissueWe got to poke into the lungs (very spongy).

Transport system

The students passed the heart around. This particular heart, although it belongs to a sheep, is about the size of your own heart, as it is just about the size of your fist. That is if it is a healthy heart. An unhealthy heart is often larger, as it has to pump very hard to keep the blood going through the vessels.

The heart

Students of 5A and 5C thought it was pretty interesting.

Dissection

She showed us the largest artery in the circulatory system; the aorta, which transport the oxygenated blood from the heart to the body (think of the beat that transports Ms. Noshie’s coffee to Lebanon).

Aorta

She then cut open the heart, and showed us the chambers (right and left atrium and the right and left ventricle).

Look

You can clearly see how a number of vessels transport blood away from the heart, and how the valves are connected to the white tissue (like little threads).

Heart

This student thought it was pretty disgusting, but most of it weren’t afraid of handling the heart at all.

Uuuugh



Well, I thought it was a very interesting session. How about you? Thank you Ms. Salem for having us over!

Article posted November 4, 2008 at 10:53 AM GMT0 • comment (5) • Reads 102



Article posted November 3, 2008 at 07:27 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 85

Sorry guys, but I am running a bit behind with the visual stuff! Here are (finally) the camping trip pictures, and then there are still some Halloween pictures to publish (a big thank you to our roommother, Leen, who organized the wonderful party, and all the moms that helped and chipped in to make it a big success), and then there was the science dissection of the heart and the lungs (done by a very professional Mrs. Salem), and I bet there is more, but for today, let’s look at some camping shots. I am sorry if I didn’t take that many, but as you may remember, we were in this incredible thunderstorm, with water everywhere, and so the light conditions were rather dark for making nice pictures.



Lucky 5D, they got to sleep in the open air. Had we done that, we’d have been washed out to sea, and on our way to Cyprus. I had insisted on ‘NO SAMSONITES ON WHEELS’ and I was happy that you had listened to me (for a change). Everything fit in the overhead compartment.



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Mr. Andre talking about the expectations.



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How to ‘Set Up A Tent 101’



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“Well, you just pull this rope, and voila!”



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“Ooooooh, that’s so easy!” I still hear you say that one.



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That was, of course, until you found out you were not nearly as long as Mr. Andre or Mr. Wissam.



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And yes, there we go. “Miss, we’re too short, even *** cannot reach it and she is the tallest in the class!”



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Hey, you guys wanted to go camping. It wasn’t my idea.



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Is there a problem, boys?



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These girls finally got their tent up and running.



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And then they are ready too, despite the fact that they are ‘too short’.



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Boys’ corner

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Girls’ corner

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And then these ninjas are done

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And by the time we are entertained by our classmates with some piano works of Bach, and a juggler, everyone is done. May the camping begin!

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Still to come; our Halloween party, and the dissection of the heart. Stay tuned.

Article posted November 3, 2008 at 07:27 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 85



Article posted October 31, 2008 at 09:00 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 76

Dear Parents of a grade 5 child;

You may believe your child when (s)he tells you that the teachers are all witches. 

Witches of Grade Five

Article posted October 31, 2008 at 09:00 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 76



Article posted October 30, 2008 at 05:13 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 89

This is not really the work of the grade 5A students, but rather of the students (grades 3, 4 and 5) that joined the ACS Elementary Photography Club. This is them, and this is also their work.



ACS Photoclub



And we should thank Mrs. Bashour for setting up an account for us so we can get all those pictures and the work (including those of grade 5A students) published for the whole world to see!

Article posted October 30, 2008 at 05:13 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 89



Article posted October 29, 2008 at 04:27 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 87

Halloween is coming up, and look what a wonderful web site Mrs. Bashour came up with! Check this out, and send me a card at snoshie@acs.edu.lb!

Miss Noshie at Halloween



(Click here to get there http://www.buildyourwildself.com)



Camping picture will follow shortly.

Article posted October 29, 2008 at 04:27 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 87



Article posted October 21, 2008 at 06:09 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 87

I brought in some bean bags. They were hanging around at home, taking up a lot of space, and nobody ever sat on them because they sit so uncomfortably. Well, guess what? You do not think they sit uncomfortably at all! Whenever we have Readers Workshop, you guys fight to get to sit on them.



DSC00605



They are so comfortable, as a matter of fact, that some students just cannot keep their eyes open. Or is he joking . . . . ?

Article posted October 21, 2008 at 06:09 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 87



Article posted October 14, 2008 at 01:04 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 77

Look at some of the fantastic graphs my students have made. They are in the process of posting them on their individual blogs as well, so check it out.

Graphs

This particular graph is a triple bar graph on the temperatures (in Celsius) in 3 major Lebanese cities (Beirut, Zahle and Tripoli).





Article posted October 14, 2008 at 01:04 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 77



Article posted October 10, 2008 at 12:00 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 83

And here we kick off our very first birthday cake of the year.



Birthday boy 1



Students that have followed this blog for a while will remember that last year we had more birthdays then that there were days in the school year, but never mind, we love a good cake.



Birthday boy

Birthday boy preparing for the cake.



And this cake was GOOD! A home made cake. We cannot mention the birthday boy’s name, because remember, you cannot write your last name with your first name, but you can also not use a name with a picture. And thus this is our birthday boy. 11 years old!



Here we were singing ‘Happy Birthday to you’, but we sang rather quickly; we wanted to eat that cake.



Birthday boy 3

“Don’t touch my cake!” (note the use of the quotation marks)



Birthday boy 2



Little did we know that those candles re-lit themselves, and as birthday boy was blowing and blowing, they kept turning themselves back on. We eventually had to take the cake outside for fear of triggering the fire alarm (don’t laugh; it has happened in the past, and more than once).

We had a fire drill yesterday, we did not want another one; we wanted to eat

Article posted October 10, 2008 at 12:00 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 83



Article posted October 9, 2008 at 10:32 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 87

Another random fact from Ms. Noshie? She makes pictures of just about everything. Yesterday, it was the fire drill.



Yes, it’s that time of the year again. And our fire drill went quite well, even though we were not in class, but had to move from the computer lab to the AUB parking lot.

DSC00506

And while we are at it, we were working on a wordle (www.wordle.net) activity. You can do that at home as well. It didn’t work this time in the lab, but the IT department has fixed it for us, so next time it will be working.

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When classes are counted and there are no students missing, teachers will hold up a green card.

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A red card means we’ve got kids missing, but as you can see; everyone’s accounted for.

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The wait can be long, but that is because we have to make sure that all students are accounted for, and that includes pre-school, middle and high school students as well. That’s some 1,000 kids (almost), and that takes a while. Especially the high school students, they always get lost.

Article posted October 9, 2008 at 10:32 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 87



Article posted October 4, 2008 at 04:08 PM GMT0 • comment (2) • Reads 93

Ms. Bashour has an interesting project going on. State 7 random facts about yourself. So here we go:



1. When I was young, I wanted to marry the Dutch Crown Prince; William Alexander. He married someone else though (Maxima from Argentina).



2. I would love to live in Australia. But I also would like to live in France. That is, when I do not want to live in Lebanon.



3. I cannot watch movies until the end. I always get up and leave halfway or three quarters of the way.



4. I have three brothers and no sisters.



5. I loved my middle and high school so much that I really did not want to go to university; I wanted to stay in school.



6. I never thought about becoming a teacher, but I have been one for 15 years now.



7. I just picked up a stray dog from the street.

Article posted October 4, 2008 at 04:08 PM GMT0 • comment (2) • Reads 93



Article posted September 9, 2008 at 02:59 PM GMT0 • comment (16) • Reads 85

And a warm welcome to all new fifth graders, and parents of a new fifth grader. This is the fifth grade blog of Ms. Noshie.

This blog will feature all kinds of non-official things. Pictures of birthdays, class events, field trips, assemblies and the likes. Just for you to see what it is like to be in grade 5A.

This blog, and your child’s blog, is one of many ways of communicating with an ever more complex, yet smaller world.

We hope you will enjoy it. Stop by often, and don’t forget to bookmark us (Click on ‘Favorites’ and then ‘add to favorites’. If you do not know how, ask your child; (s)he knows)



First I would like you to meet the grade 5 team. The Grade 5 Team Yes, we actually do come to school like that. From left to right; Ms. Noshie, Ms. Salem, Ms. Rishani and Ms. Branch (and yes, we can use our names with our pictures, because we are over 13).



Morning Meeting 1



Today we started of with a Morning Meeting. I’m glad to report that all 17 students were present! That’s an excellent start.

New Year Assembly

We then had a New Year’s Assembly on the (very hot hot hot hot) roof.



The Technology Teacher



And this is the lady that keeps us all blogging; Mrs. Bashour, the technology teacher.



We hope to see you pass by more often this year on this blog. Leave a comment if you’d like to.

Article posted September 9, 2008 at 02:59 PM GMT0 • comment (16) • Reads 85



Article posted June 19, 2008 at 04:03 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 112

190608 -1

The boys (Uuh, where did Dennis go?)

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The girls



Boy, I wish you'd come to school like this every day!.



For pictures made during today’s ceremony:

SuperColor (Aysah Bakkar - Verdun) has them. Their phone number is 01- 736 910. Prices depend on the photo size, and they also have a video, but that one is available a week from now. Give them a call if you are interested.

The yearbooks are here. Please come to the office to get your copy. The offices hours are 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.



Have a Great Summer!

Article posted June 19, 2008 at 04:03 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 112



Article posted June 12, 2008 at 07:59 AM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 105

Cake? What cake?

R2



I am telling you, we are getting so good at this that this cake was already over and done with before we could even get the camera out! Happy birthday to this boy in blue! And it was a homemade cake as well. What’s more; the birthday boy had baked it himself! Alas, we ate too fast, so no picture of the cake.

And is this going to be the last cake of the year? Who knows, still 3 days left of school!



R



And while we are at it, today was Multi-cultural Circle time. And since our class represents Holland, we made windmills. Ms. Noshie couldn’t get hers flying, but then Dennis figured out how to do it, and soon all our windmills ere flying! Just like in Holland. Good job!



Windmills



What’s the deal with that little boy in pink? Is he choking  ?

Article posted June 12, 2008 at 07:59 AM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 105



Article posted May 30, 2008 at 12:17 PM GMT0 • comment (3) • Reads 93

So today was another …. Yes, you guessed it, a birthday.

Birthday Boy

I told you, this is about all we do in grade 5. This birthday boy gave us yummy chocolate cake.

So who is having his birthday this Monday?

Circus

These boys are practicing an act for the graduation show, I understand.

Hungry

These girls are waiting for the cake to fill their hungry bellies.

Article posted May 30, 2008 at 12:17 PM GMT0 • comment (3) • Reads 93



Article posted May 30, 2008 at 11:23 AM GMT0 • comment (2) • Reads 85

When we do not celebrate birthdays, do you think we do any learning? Noooo, we celebrate other things. Today, it was Lebanon. We had a nice Lebanese breakfast on the roof, and then ended up dancing the Dabkeh!

Dabke 5

Dabke 4

Dabke 3

Dabke 2

Dabke 1

Dabke

We do occasionally learn something, though. Now and then.

Boys don't dance

Oh yes, and boys don’t dance. Some boys, that is.

Article posted May 30, 2008 at 11:23 AM GMT0 • comment (2) • Reads 85



Article posted May 29, 2008 at 12:00 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 93

Another birthday! Well, you probably wonder, do they do anything else in this classroom apart from celebrating birthdays? No. I mean, yes! Of course we do. But celebrating birthdays is so much fun, especially if a cake is involved!



Birthday



The girls are looking at the cake, the boys are looking at the camera.

Another girl hitting the 11! Next year it’s Middle School for her. That little green girl is her sister. And who is the boy in the pink shirt, who is looking so longingly at the cake?



Birthday 1



Time is running out for you guys in grade 5. Three more weeks, and you will be (hopefully) 6th graders!

Article posted May 29, 2008 at 12:00 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 93



Article posted May 27, 2008 at 08:51 AM GMT0 • comment (4) • Reads 112

Some daily scenes in the class room. Believe me, I have tried and I have tried, but a few of you still cannot keep your cubby hole clean. So here are some examples of a GOOD cubby hole, and a BAD cubby hole. I hope you recognize your own!



cubby holes 5



GOOD!



cubby holes 4



NOT SO GOOD!







cubby holes 3



NEAT!





cubby holes 2



OH DEAR!. WHERE DO I BEGIN?



cubby holes 1



HELP!



cybby holes



WHOSE IS THIS!!!!

Article posted May 27, 2008 at 08:51 AM GMT0 • comment (4) • Reads 112



Article posted May 25, 2008 at 07:47 PM GMT0 • comment (5) • Reads 90

Well, no luck for us on Monday. Back to school it is. Hope you can handle it. It took me about 3 hours to regain my composition. But fair is fair; when school told me there wouldn’t be school for like four days in a row, I didn’t complain either.



collage



Here are some photos of Field Day, to ease the pain.

See you tomorrow (hopefully).



Article posted May 25, 2008 at 07:47 PM GMT0 • comment (5) • Reads 90



Article posted May 19, 2008 at 01:57 PM GMT0 • comment (3) • Reads 93

And here we are again, back in school! Tomorrow full throttle into math and science, and we will also resume the MAP testing. Field day will take place but we do not know yet when, we will have to wait until things have returned to normal. Right now, I’ve got about one month to teach you things that need about three months, so, let’s get started!



Birthday Girl 1



And what better way to start the week with a cake. Even better; two cakes, for the happy birthday girl (we cannot mention names) who became eleven today! Yeah!!!



Cake



The cake was delicious, but I must say, the girls seem to be having way much more fun than the boys.



Birthday Girl



What a serious bunch!

Article posted May 19, 2008 at 01:57 PM GMT0 • comment (3) • Reads 93



Article posted May 10, 2008 at 02:24 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 100

I hope each and every one of you is safe and sound (and done with your homework). I am fine, the only casualty was my water tank on the roof, and now I have no water anymore, but other than that, all is well.

I would appreciate if you could all write down your own experiences, and put them on your blog. It may be interesting to read for children in other countries, and even for yourself in a couple of months from now.

And since most of you are stuck at home anyway, let’s do some creative writing!



I hope to see you all in tip-top shape on Monday.

Article posted May 10, 2008 at 02:24 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 100



Article posted May 7, 2008 at 08:03 PM GMT0 • comment (3) • Reads 93

We went on a field trip to check out the water bottling factory of Sohat. Because Lebanon consists of a lot of limestone, there are lots of aquifers (underground water reservoirs) that provide the country with excellent drinking water. We didn’t get to see the source (it is deep in the mountain and protected so it does not get contaminated), but we did get to see how they make (and recycle) the plastic bottles. It was cool.



Sohat



Then we went on a fossil hunt. We learned lots of things about Lebanon’s geology, and how sedimentary rocks contains a lot of fossils. In Lebanon we have fish fossils, and fossils of univalves and bivalves, because this land used to be a tropical sea (we were underwater), but due to tectonic plate lifting, the land ended up on the mountain. Or actually, the seafloor became a mountain.



It took some time before the fossil hunting took off, because the students did not know the difference between a pebble and a fossil. Until one of them found one, and off they went, all over the hill. They found lots of fossils.



Fieldtrip



We found a lot of univalves, like this pretty one, found by Deya.



Univalve



Bivalves were even more common, as you can see here. Luana found a beautiful fossil of a sea urchin, but I forgot to take a picture of it.



Bivalves



Hadi soon was more interested in butterflies, and this one stayed with him for a long time.



Butterfly



While Ali was into shell casings, which he insisted on calling ‘bullets’.



Shell CAsings



Dennis found some life ammo, but I think Mr. Andre took it from him. Poor Dennis, because the next day, he almost broke his hand. And then we had lunch near a waterfall.



Waterfall



And that was our morning field trip to the mountains

Article posted May 7, 2008 at 08:03 PM GMT0 • comment (3) • Reads 93



Article posted April 25, 2008 at 06:31 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 89

Look what this lovely child brought me this morning? 5 lovely gardenias!



Gardenias 2

They had a wonderful scent, the entire class smelled of them.

Gardenias

I thought that was so sweet, I just had to put him on the class blog. Thank you!



You all have a good break, and don’t forget to read. Oh, and we have a field trip the Monday we come back to school. I will mail your parents about that one. If you don’t receive a mail, check my site in a couple of days.



Article posted April 25, 2008 at 06:31 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 89



Article posted April 22, 2008 at 12:00 PM GMT0 • comment (2) • Reads 102

‘What is written without effort, is read without pleasure.’



And with this motto in mind, I hope you guys (my students, that is) will soon start posting some of your expository texts that we have been working so hard on. We sure have made an effort, and the ones I have read so far were pretty good. So post those essays on your blogs!





Dani’s essay on a nifty Mesopotamian invention; the sailboat.

Dani expo

And this is Stefan’s essay. Same topic but different angle.

Stefan Expo

Don’t they look like real newspaper articles? I think so!

Article posted April 22, 2008 at 12:00 PM GMT0 • comment (2) • Reads 102



Article posted April 18, 2008 at 12:54 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 103

Remember the graphic organizers we were working on? I bet you all are eager to know what happened to them. Well, they are slowly evolving into a six paragraph essay. That’s an expository text, of course.



The topic is a Mesopotamian invention. The Mesopotamians – one of the world’s first civilizations – were clever people. They encountered numerous problems, but for every (well, almost every) problem, they came up with a fine solution: they invented something to solve the problem.



Many of these inventions we will still use today. There is of course the wheel, but what about writing? The envelope? The sail for a sailboat? All from Mesopotamia. Laws, scribes, irrigation systems, the plow and the hoe, bronze, beer, superheroes (Gilgamesh was a Mesopotamian Johnny Bravo!) and the pottery wheel are to name just a few. So a lot of research needs to be done, before writing your essay.



Here is a picture essay. The captions give you some extra explanation.



You start with reading up on your topic.

expo2But the information is not always easy to find.

expo12When looking for information on the hoe and the plow, you notice there is no plow or hoe in the index.

expo3But look, here you find it, under ‘agriculture’.

expo4Very often you find facts that you do not need, but that is much more interesting than the facts you do need.

expo11Sometimes you feel you do not have enough information yet, and you look for another book. Maybe your friend knows what book has more information.

expo1Ah, this one has exactly what I need.

exop16You make some more notes

expo6And then you start with the paragraphs of the body.

expo13You start with paragraphs 2, 3, 4 and 5 first.

expo18Everyone has a different writing position.

Knees down, …

expo15Or one knee up, …

expo17Or on two knees (this is a rather odd position, though.

expo8

Time for peer-editing. Friends help each other out

expo14

I think I am done. Did I miss anything?

expo10Now it is time to type the essay onto your AlphaSmart (portable keyboard) So what file are you going to use?

expo9

The correct position to type. Excellent!

expo7Everyone works at his or her own pace. Some are still researching, others make notes, some write, and some type.

expo5

The last step is to download it from your Alpha Smart onto the computer.



And that's all for the moment.





.

Article posted April 18, 2008 at 12:54 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 103



Article posted April 15, 2008 at 12:57 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 99

Happy Birthday to this girl!

Birthday

Birthday Girl and Friends



The cake was delicious! It had her picture on it! Look, she’s got her own head on a dish!

Birthday 1

And so, because it is the month of poetry, a birthday poem.



I’m wishing you another year

Of laughter, joy and fun,

Surprises, love and happiness,

And when your birthday’s done,

I hope you feel deep in your heart,

As your birthdays come and go,

How very much you mean to me,

More than you can know.

By Joanna Fuchs



And this is how Dani fixes a torn shirt!

Shirt

Article posted April 15, 2008 at 12:57 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 99



Article posted April 15, 2008 at 08:44 AM GMT0 • comment (3) • Reads 101

And because April is the month of Poetry (I am being told), here ‘s something for you. Ms. Noshie’s most favorite poem was written by Gwendolyn Brooks (1917 –2000).



Gwendolyn-Brooks

This picture comes from www.sweetsandbody.com/Gwendolyn-Brooks.jpg.



The first time I read the poem was when I was 19, and going up in a cable car in San Francisco with a friend. The poem was pasted on the wall of the cable car, as an advertisement. I had just graduated from High School, and liked the ‘flow’ of the poem, even though I did not really understand the poem. It wasn’t until I was in university that I figured out what it was about. Sometimes poems are like that. They may have a ‘good feel’ to them, even if you do not ‘get the message’. It goes like this:



We real cool. We Left school. We

Lurk late. We Strike straight. We

Sing sin. We Thin gin. We

Jazz June. We Die soon.



It wasn’t until I started teaching, that I found out the title of the poem;

‘The Pool Players’. I feel that although the title fit the poem, it does not fit my ‘feelings’ to the poem.

Well, that’s how it goes sometimes.



How about you posting your favorite poem and telling us how you ‘discovered’ the poem?



And don’t forget to check the ‘footprint’ you are leaving behind on this planet at Ms. Bashour’s blog!

Article posted April 15, 2008 at 08:44 AM GMT0 • comment (3) • Reads 101



Article posted April 10, 2008 at 10:25 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 100

We’ve been working on expository writing this month. One of the characteristics that makes an expository text distinctly different from a narrative text is that it has an introduction, a conclusion and a body.



DSC00190

Kids in action



We’re working on the body now. The body is the most important part, as all of the information will be in the body.

collage2

Many different types



And this is how we take the body of an expository text apart, by making graphic organizers, and identifying the main ideas and the supporting details.

As you can see, each student has a different way of making a graphic organizer. Some like to be neat, others just scribble.



DSC00194

This one almost looks like a spider web



The next step is of course to make your own graphic organizer, and put it together in a body for your own expository writing. Simple, no?

Article posted April 10, 2008 at 10:25 AM GMT0 • comment • Reads 100



Article posted April 8, 2008 at 02:49 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 205

We are learning in social studies about the world’s very first writing system. We know that the Phoenicians (original inhabitants of Lebanon) invented the alphabet, but that is not the same as writing. You use an alphabet when you write, but you can also use pictures (pictographs) and other type of symbols.

Clay tablet 1

The Mesopotamians used pictures first, and later these changed into little symbols made with a reed, and that created little wedge-shaped symbols.

Clay tablet 2

Wedge shaped means ‘cuneiform’ in Greek, hence the name ‘cuneiform’ for this type of writing. We also have the word ‘stylo’ (‘pen’ in French), which we also got from the Greek, who called that little reed stick a ‘stylus’, or writing implement.



The Mesopotamians pressed these little symbols in clay, just because they happened to have quite a lot of it, it was cheap, and when dried, could not be changed.

Clay tablet

So, there, now you know it all. We made our own clay tablet. I think the overall learning experience was that this is a lot harder than you think. These Mesopotamians were clever people!

DSC00145

Article posted April 8, 2008 at 02:49 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 205



Article posted April 3, 2008 at 04:38 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 94

Credit is due. I cannot name names – remember, you always have to stay safe online – but we know who they are, and thanks to their wonderful prediction skills, they got the order of mushers crossing the finish line of the Iditarod 2008 correct.

080321 018



Dani’s musher was a winner! Salah got second place and Ms. Noshie’s musher made it to a third place. All other mushers were scratched or withdrew.



And because I promised the winner a cake, we ended up with two cakes, because there were three winners, and one of the winners does not like chocolate cake, so I had to get two cakes!



You owe that cake to them. A big hand!!!! And to Mrs. Bashour, who got us into the Iditarod race in the first place!



Mr. Andre gave me a movie on the Idiatrod race, and hopefully we will be watching that one next week (if you’re good kids, hint hint). It is like ‘Snowdogs’, but this one is a serious one (drama), not a comedy.



I'm on for next year's Iditarod. What do you think guys? Will you follow the race in 6th grade? I know some of you signed up to the newsletter, so you will be able to follow it all.

Article posted April 3, 2008 at 04:38 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 94



Article posted March 29, 2008 at 11:13 AM GMT0 • comment (6) • Reads 96

projects copy

They look pretty good, don't they? I'm almost done grading them.

Article posted March 29, 2008 at 11:13 AM GMT0 • comment (6) • Reads 96



Article posted March 14, 2008 at 12:36 PM GMT0 • comment (2) • Reads 113

Lots of things are happening in class and in school, but I am so busy I barely have the time to write about it. That’s why I’ll just post some pictures of the class.



Here’s a picture of a sixth grader (left side) and a fifth grader (right side). There is quite a bit of difference in length as you can see. That’s because the 6th is from Northern Europe, and the 5th grader is from the Middle East. The average height between the two people is rather different. We’re learning about that in math.



Classroom 6



In science we are working on Landform project, and it is done on the computer. I will upload some of the results once we’re done with them, which should be next Wednesday.



Classroom 5

Library Research



We also have our daily math problem, which some students do but then forget to hand it in to me.



Classroom 4



We also have Arabic. This is an Arabic circle discussion.



Classroom 3



These two hard working hard.

Classroom 1



This is a student that refuses to be on the picture. But as he is so engaged in reading, I secretly took a picture of him in front of the class room library. Good one, eh?



Classroom

Article posted March 14, 2008 at 12:36 PM GMT0 • comment (2) • Reads 113



Article posted March 4, 2008 at 04:33 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 94

How about you guys leaving a little note on this poor boy’s blog (or his e-mail, but you will have to do that at home), as he is in sick bay right now.

ACS Faqra 053

He had his appendix (as I understand it) removed on Monday. Yes, not pretty, but I’m sure he’ll tell you all about it when he gets back.

And Mrs. B. could use a nice note from you as well. It is always good to know that you are being missed, and we sure miss her, don’t we?

31 018

And yes, I know Mrs. B. doesn’t usually look this way, but remember what she said: ‘No names with pictures, or if you do, then the picture must not be recognizable.’ Well, I guess you all know she is not the gentleman on the left.

Hi Mrs. B, grade 5a misses you, and hope you come back soon!

This is what Mrs. B wrote me, by the way; 'Please tell the students that I hope to see something new posted by the end of the week. Most of them have written something they should be proud to share. Please ask them to upload it to their blog.'

(Report card grades are coming up, remember? hint hint hint.)

camping 010

And one last picture I found of this cute little boy reading. Had to add it. Hope Mrs. Branch sees this one; The Literacy Model in action!

Article posted March 4, 2008 at 04:33 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 94



Article posted February 22, 2008 at 06:28 PM GMT0 • comment (2) • Reads 107

This week was the grade 5 annual trip to the snow; ski camp! It was first postponed due to lack of snow, and then we were worried it might get postponed again because of too much snow. Luckily, it didn’t. But there was definitely a lot of snow.

ACS Faqra



On the way up, we got stuck on a narrow mountain road, because someone in front of us got stuck, and soon enough we had a Lebanese style traffic jam, with everyone trying to go the same way at the same time.

ACS Faqra 1



A number of snow removal machine dropped by as well, and soon we were on our way again to Faqra.

ACS Faqra 2



The snow and the weather were wonderful.

ACS Faqra 4 copy

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And this is our class in Faqra.

I tried to make pictures of all of you, but you guys are so fast, half of the time you were out of view by the time I had my camera ready, so you’ll have to be satisfied with what I’ve got.

ACS Faqra 6



This is how you go up, on a T-bar.

ACS Faqra 7



The scenery is pretty fabulous, as you can see.

ACS Faqra 3



One of the groups on the hill.

5



This is a green daredevil. She survived the jump, but it was a close encounter.

ACS Faqra 14



We had students all over the different slopes. (Blue daredevil)

ACS Faqra 13



And another one.

ACS Faqra  15



And snow was a first one for this guy. They don’t have snow in Alabama, I guess. He’s pretty excited about it.

ACS Faqra 11



Of course, when you go to the snow, you’ve got to go sleighing, and you must have a snowball fight.

Boys

Some boys.




And some girls.

ACS Faqra 074-1



And some more girls

ACS Faqra 20



And some aliens from outer space.

ACS Faqra 18



And then it was time to go again. This one obviously enjoyed herself.

ACS Faqra 19



Yes, I know, a short trip. But a good trip. And a little sad too, because this is their last trip to Faqra. Most of these students have gone to the ACS ski camp since grade 2. Even grade 1 goes sledding there. But that’s it, folks. No more skiing in grade 6!

ACS Faqra  20



It was a good trip. Half of them fell asleep on the bus.

Article posted February 22, 2008 at 06:28 PM GMT0 • comment (2) • Reads 107



Article posted February 20, 2008 at 02:34 PM GMT0 • comment (2) • Reads 84



Who will win the Iditarod Race 2008?
Who, oh who, of you classmates (including Ms. Noshie) will be the first to pass the finish line in the Iditarod Dog Sled Race? Remember, winner gets a cake!
Hadi (Team Garnie)
Salah (Team Rogers)
Naim (Team Paulsen)
Dani (Team Mackey)
Raami (Team Williams)
Noshie (Team Curtis)
















Article posted February 20, 2008 at 02:34 PM GMT0 • comment (2) • Reads 84



Article posted February 13, 2008 at 01:36 PM GMT0 • comment (5) • Reads 106

Just some pictures from our computer lab.

acs5This is our computer teacher, teaching one of the students how to upload a picture onto the Internet for the Iditarod project.

acs10

He is writing/typing.

computerThe girl on the left is checking her work before printing it out, and the one on the right is giving her advice.

Article posted February 13, 2008 at 01:36 PM GMT0 • comment (5) • Reads 106



Article posted February 13, 2008 at 01:31 PM GMT0 • comment (5) • Reads 88

We’ve had lots of cake this week. Birthday boy number #1 (we can’t name names) brought in a delicious vanilla cake.

ACS0

The grin is not a usual thing; he just does not like to have his photo taken.



Birthday boy number #2 (in yellow shirt) had a delicious chocolate cake.

acs8

He also does not like to have his picture taken and therefore totally ignores the camera. But he knows we’re all watching.



Happy birthdays, gentlemen, and may we grow up to be wise. Ahum.

Article posted February 13, 2008 at 01:31 PM GMT0 • comment (5) • Reads 88



Article posted February 13, 2008 at 01:27 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 81

What are these kids hanging out of the window for? What are they trying to catch?

acs6

Hail



They are touching the hail of course!

What’s the big deal, you may wonder? Well, hail is very unusual in Beirut.



I (Miss Noshie) come from a culture of perpetual rain. No, not England, it is Holland. And if it gets really cold, this rain turns into hail, or snow, depending on the weather conditions in the upper spheres. So hail is something I have seen. And seen again. And again. And ….. yes, you guessed it, again.

When I was in school (eons ago), I biked 7 kilometers to school in the morning in hail, and I would have to bike those same 7 kilometers back again in the afternoon in .. . you guessed it; hail.



However, now I am teaching in Middle East, and in Lebanon, we don’t get a lot of rain, except for some in the winter months. And even if we get rain, it never gets that cold that we get hail.

hail 1

This year has been different. We’ve had hail in Beirut. And for most of her students, hail is a big thing. A BIG thing. And that is why they are hanging out of the window; catching hail stones (more like grains).

Article posted February 13, 2008 at 01:27 PM GMT0 • comment (1) • Reads 81



Article posted February 4, 2008 at 08:54 AM GMT0 • comment (3) • Reads 87

Look what Ms. Noshie got in her inbox! A wonderful note from Ali, who was sick most of last week. I'd like to share it with you here, because I thought it was so very thoughtful of Ali.



"Hello Mrs. Noshie, it is me Ali. I am really sick. I am receiving all my homework in time.

My cousin Souhiel is sending them to me. I really miss the class. I hope to be in on Monday. I say hi to all the class and to all the teachers. I barely wrote anything because I am going to sleep. I will send another message tomorrow.



From: Ali

To : 5A and Mrs.Noshie"



Now wasn't that sweet? I thought it was.

Article posted February 4, 2008 at 08:54 AM GMT0 • comment (3) • Reads 87



Article posted January 18, 2008 at 07:19 PM GMT0 • comment (6) • Reads 81

A teacher from Canada, Mrs. Brown (http://www.classblogmeister.com/blog.php?blogger_id=73127), has invited us to join her students in an online project around the Iditarod Trail Dog Race (http://www.iditarod.com/ ).



In case you don’t know what trail dogs are; here in Lebanon we call them huskies, although everyone who knows about those dogs tells me that is inaccurate. (Here is a link of someone who breeds these sled dogs: http://www.warmspringskennels.com/default.htm, and also participates in this race!)



We do not see those dogs a lot in Lebanon, as the weather is much too warm for them (unless you live high up in the mountains all year long).

These dogs are well adapted to cold and snow.



The race begins March 1st in Alaska and we would start in February on the project to prep the students for the race.

Are we joining the race? Well, not in person (although I would love to), but virtually.

We will be learning about these dogs, but also about the race, and Alaska. It will be great fun.



And to show Mrs. Brown’s class a bit about who we are, I took some pictures during recess today.



Hamra 016

Now this is the view from our school roof. Living in a big city means there is very limited space, so we have recess on our school roof. But the view is magnificent. We look out over the Mediterranean Sea (do you guys ever look?), and in the distance you can see the snowy peaks of the mountains (but not that day).

Hamra 027

These three girls were fighting (play fight) all recess with a number of boys over the ball. Ummm, did anyone tell L. about the dress code? Can’t show your belly!

Hamra 038

They play soccer every single recess, this group. When coach Rani and I watch this, we always have to laugh. It’s not real soccer, it’s more like ‘mob-ball.’

Hamra 030

Obviously arguments over who gets the kick the ball when and where and how erupt frequently, but they are (usually) dealt with in a civilized manner. Although who’s not keeping his hands to himself (again)?

Hamra 020-1

These are two friends, although some days they are not, and other days they are. As you can see, it is mid-winter, but we do not even have to where jackets outside. Last week was a little nippy, (8 degrees Celsius is considered VERY cold in Beirut), but it was nice warm today.

Hamra 024

Now here’s a happy camper! This is M, but I wonder what he is so happy about.



And these are just some shots of a recess in the life of a fifth grader at ACS. More to follow.



Check out the links I gave you. I don't think they show in blue on this blog, but you can copy and paste them into the browser. (Open New Window).



Mrs. Brown’s class liked your ‘I Am From’ poems so much, that her students wrote some pretty good ones too. Check them out!

Article posted January 18, 2008 at 07:19 PM GMT0 • comment (6) • Reads 81



Article posted January 18, 2008 at 10:46 AM GMT0 • comment (3) • Reads 99


Get a Voki now!



Well, isn't that nifty? The things you can do with technology. How's the studying for the science test going?

Article posted January 18, 2008 at 10:46 AM GMT0 • comment (3) • Reads 99



Article posted January 14, 2008 at 08:26 AM GMT0 • comment (3) • Reads 100

The Winter Break is over, and already out of our minds (“When’s the next holiday, Miss?” students ask me? Well, the next was only 2 days later (Islamic New Year), and now we are looking at Ashoura on a Friday maybe, so that is another holiday.

If you live in a country where there are so many religious communities (17 in all), and they all have their religious feasts, you get a lot of days off.

Isn’t Tolerance (this month’s virtue) a wonderful thing? If we wouldn’t be so tolerant, we’d have a lot less days off. Tolerance is something to be cherished; a lot of good things come out of it.

My poor students did not have much of a break, they say. Each had to read two books! And two books on, or a little bit above, their Reading Level. And this week they were all working hard on their Oral Book Presentations. snow 004 Here is a picture of one of the very first (and also best prepared) student at work.

We’re done with half of the 21 students, and I must say, I was pretty impressed with the results so far!



And how about telling Mrs. B. what you thought of the MAP testing?

Article posted January 14, 2008 at 08:26 AM GMT0 • comment (3) • Reads 100



Article posted December 18, 2007 at 12:46 PM GMT0 • comment (9) • Reads 93

Today all went well and as planned (for once!). We had a wonderful assembly. Santa Claus did faintly resemble Mr. Owyang, I must say.

Choir

Kyla and her choir group gave an excellent performance!



Then we (FINALLY) went to Rauche to knap (that is the word used to chip stones) some flint stone for our Social Studies unit on Paleolithic Times (Old Stone age).

Field trip Most of Lebanon is made up of limestone, and inside limestone you often find embedded nodules of flint. <Host unlimited photos at slide.com for FREE!

At Rauche, next to the Mediterranean Sea, it is very easy to see. Host unlimited photos at slide.com for FREE!

They are gathered in two distinct (remember that word?) layers.

Stone tools 2

Mr. Andre, showed us the nodules, and how to get them out of the limestone with a hammer.

Stone tool 1

We had to wear safety goggles, because chips of flint that fly away can easily hurt your eyes. In Paleolithic times, our ancestors went flint mining here. Archeologists at AUB told me they found several places at Rauche where stone tools had been made over 100,000 years ago.

Stone tool

Some of you arrived at making some razor sharp blades that cut right through rope. Last year we had Mazen almost severing his finger with his own stone tool. This year no accidents luckily, although Mr. Andre did bring the first-aid kit, just in case.

Shadi dropped his goggles down the cliff however, but Mr. Andre came to the rescue.

Cliff

The weather was absolutely gorgeous! Hot enough to go for a swim in the Mediterranean Sea. We, unfortunately had to go back to school.



At school however, we got our turkey lunch. The room mothers did an excellent job.

Room mothers

Thank you so much, ladies. Mrs. Schray, the head-room mother, put so much work in it, and then she ended up not being able to join us today, because today she had her exams (She’s in university). So she is not in the picture. We hope she is going to pass.

Kahil

Ms. Kahil, who was last year’s teacher of some of you, also went back to university, in Canada, but today she passed by today to say hello to some of her ‘old’ kids. They were happy to see her.

Caveman

And this child (can’t name names, but we all know him), inspired by the field trip, did an impersonation of a Homo erectus. Pretty good resemblance, no?



And then it was time to go home. I gathered all my gifts, packed my bags, and off I went. I hope you are going to enjoy your well-deserved break as much as I will.

Article posted December 18, 2007 at 12:46 PM GMT0 • comment (9) • Reads 93



Article posted December 17, 2007 at 03:14 PM GMT0 • comment (8) • Reads 232

Never heard of this expression: When it rains, it pours? When something goes wrong, everything goes wrong?



First, we were supposed to go on our ‘stone tool making’ field trip on Friday. Did we? No, because suddenly school got cancelled on Thursday night.



Help



“What? You want to come in?” Kids in the hallway.



Did your parents tell you on Thursday night, or did they let you sleep in Friday morning? I did not tell my son, and then woke him up at 9:00 Friday morning, telling him ‘wake up wake up, you’re one hour late for school!” Boy, that got him in the shower fast! Nasty, I know. :)

Anyway, we postponed the field trip to Monday.



Saturday was the winter carnival. I was glad to see quite a few of you there. Wasn’t it nice? I enjoyed it! Look at these guys! Too cool!



Hanging out

Winter Carnival Dudes



Then on Monday we were supposed to go make stone tools from flint, but guess what? The army closed the roads. So the busses could not leave the school, and thus no field trip (again!).



What was worse is that we were supposed to have our big turkey lunch to celebrate the upcoming Winter Break. Well, guess what? The turkey man couldn’t make it to school, because . . . yep, the army wouldn’t let him pass the road block to get to our school.



So no turkey, no field trip and to make matters worse, some of you got picked two hours later than usual because they would not let parents pass either in their cars. That’s life in this place.

Bored

Bored, waiting for the school bus that doesn’t show up (stuck at the check point)



And tomorrow? Well, tomorrow, Tuesday, I’ve got this field trip planned, and the turkey lunch, but in this place, who knows what will happen! Keep your fingers crossed!



Article posted December 17, 2007 at 03:14 PM GMT0 • comment (8) • Reads 232



Article posted December 6, 2007 at 05:11 PM GMT0 • comment (10) • Reads 99

Seems like that’s all we do in grade 5; tripping. Now that is not entirely true, (don’t you know it!), we do sit in class about 170 days a year. It just so happens that this week we have two field trips.



Today we went on a Social Studies Field trip to the AUB Archaeological Museum (which happens to be next door to our school) to see real fossils and artifacts of our early ancestors. Museum 2And that’s us in front of the Archaeological Museum of AUB.



All these items were excavated right here in Lebanon, or in neighboring Syria.

A real paleoanthropologist gave us a tour, and explained what each item tells us about early life. MuseumThis is the paleoanthropologist talking about the Paleothic Period Collection



We saw lots of stone tools (hand axes, scrapers, arrow heads etc) and other stone tools. Museum 1

We saw an actual skeleton of an early human, and even the very first brace!braceThis is a ’neolithic’ retainer. Aren’t you glad you live today?



They also showed the layers of sediments (stratigraphy) that you see during an excavation (or dig). Stratigraphy



I think the paleoanthropologist was very impressed that we knew all the terminology so well!



On the way back it started raining on us. Our next field trip (stone tool making with flint) will have to wait until the weather gets a little better.

Article posted December 6, 2007 at 05:11 PM GMT0 • comment (10) • Reads 99



Article posted December 5, 2007 at 09:12 AM GMT0 • comment (21) • Reads 94

We went tree planting this week! A number of weeks ago, Lebanon was plagued by a large number of forest fires. We usually have some forest fires in summer, because it does not rain at all in summer. However, this year was particularly bad. The students of Ms. Rishani organized a bake sale, and with the money ($510) they earned, they bought 84 trees.



And this week, all the grade 5 classes went up to the mountains (which is about 25 kilometers away from school) to plant these trees in a forest near the village of Deir el-Qamar. This region was particularly hit hard by the fires. And so we got to plant pine trees and olive trees.



What was interesting was that we found a lot of limestone in the area. We are currently studying the “Theory of Continental Drift’ in science, and learned that limestone is formed at the bottom of warm, shallow seas and is composed entirely of fossilized marine creatures, everything from plankton to clams and fish. We also found some flint, which our early ancestors used to make stone tools with (a topic we study in social studies). And so we made connections to lots of subject areas.



It was a fun trip. Rhea’s dad, who accompanied us on the trip, did get a head ache though from our loud talking on the bus.



Tree_planting

Article posted December 5, 2007 at 09:12 AM GMT0 • comment (21) • Reads 94



Article posted November 27, 2007 at 06:06 PM GMT0 • comment (6) • Reads 100

Well, I am only just finding out about all the things I can do on this 5A blog, so I am going to start with a picture. You all know who this is, of course. Now doesn’t she look gorgeous?



Halloween+Angel



I chose template #3, as I thought it was quite appropriate for our science unit. What template are you planning to choose? Template #6 is a good one too!



I think the next thing I will publish is an ‘I Am From’ poem? Why don’t you publish yours? The ones I have read so far were pretty impressive! Only if you want to, of course. You may want to remain ‘anonymous’, just like Jack in Mrs. Stretchberry’s class. (Now what kind of connection is that?)

Article posted November 27, 2007 at 06:06 PM GMT0 • comment (6) • Reads 100



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