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“The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you.”
― B.B. King

by Julie Hooper

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Article posted October 20, 2014 at 06:49 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 370



As Red as Blood is reminiscent of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, but it is written for a young adult audience, so it is much less violent and dark while still being quite the thriller. Something in Lumikki’s childhood has taught her that is it safer not to be noticed. Only 17, she lives alone in a rundown apartment and attends an arts magnet high school 70 miles away from her parents. Despite her best efforts to remain apart from all high school drama, Lumikki is drawn into a dangerous cat and mouse game when she stumbles upon cash being literally laundered in the school darkroom. Three of the most popular kids at her school have found a bag of bloody euros and intend to keep it. The bad guys that left the bloody cash as a message for one of their associates, a crooked cop, want the money back. Mistaken identity, an international crime ring, murder and more kept me turning pages. Readers will wait anxiously for the second and third books in the series to be published in English.

Article posted October 20, 2014 at 06:49 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 370



Article posted October 16, 2014 at 04:31 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 188

Read this one if you like edgy psychological thrillers. Jamie and his sister Cate are adopted into a wealthy family after the murder of their young, unstable and poverty stricken mother. Cate was always the good one - until she wasn't. Jamie learns she is getting out of jail after serving time for burning down a horse barn and injuring a classmate. Why didn’t their adoptive parents tell him she is getting out? Is Cate coming back for him? What can’t Jaime remember and why?

“Metaphorically speaking, Complicit broke all the windows of my house and left me hiding under the bed like a dog spooked by 4th of July fireworks.” William Polking, the Nerdy Book Club

Article posted October 16, 2014 at 04:31 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 188



Article posted October 6, 2014 at 07:29 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 240



Peter Byerly is a widower grieving his beloved wife when he chances upon a miniature portrait of her tucked in an old book. But wait, it can’t be his wife; the watercolor looks hundreds of years old. Peter, an antique book dealer who suffers from social anxiety, becomes a sleuth as he tracks down clues as to the origin and subject of this portrait. In the course of his investigation, he discovers a literary “Holy Grail”, which could put to rest once and for all speculation that Shakespeare was the not the author of his works. Part mystery, part literary history with a love story thrown in for good measure, this book moves back and forth between the 1980s, the present and the Shakespearean era.

Article posted October 6, 2014 at 07:29 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 240



Article posted September 15, 2014 at 05:51 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 824

www.LooGix.com
www.LooGix.com

Article posted September 15, 2014 at 05:51 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 824



Article posted July 14, 2014 at 04:35 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 1386

The year is 2051 and Earth is being destroyed by global warming. The U.S. has been divided into two states, Eastern and Western, with a large wasteland in between. The government controlled states have many seeming advantages, but Faith’s family lives outside the states. They are Drifters, who resist the government. Faith has attended many different schools, because the population outside the states is getting smaller and smaller. Her best friend leaves for the Western state, and she is sad and lonely. She is attracted to a boy who is training for the World Games, but that turns out very badly indeed. Dylan is watching her and helps her learn how to control her Pulse, the ability to move objects with her mind. Is Faith the one who is destined to help Dylan save the world? This first book in the trilogy has me ready for number two!

Article posted July 14, 2014 at 04:35 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 1386



Article posted July 14, 2014 at 04:17 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 209

Imagine your meddlesome but well intentioned best friend signs you up for an online dating site. You are irritated, but curious. You login and almost immediately see a profile picture of a man who you loved and lost many years ago. Would you contact him? What if you discovered this long lost love was involved in the disappearance of not one, but several women?

Detective Kat Donovan is wrestling with ghosts from her past in this fast paced novel. Her investigation also calls into question the circumstances of her detective father’s murderer. Why did her father’s partner, now her boss, visit the man accused of murdering her father just before he confessed? Coben keeps the plot twists coming in this satisfying read.

Article posted July 14, 2014 at 04:17 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 209



Article posted July 14, 2014 at 04:00 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 197

Another dystopian thriller with a strong female protagonist, Reboot , is just the book for fans of Hunger Games, Divergent and Legend. Rebooks are teens who have died due to a virus that his decimating the population and risen from the dead minus many human weaknesses. They are faster, stronger versions of themselves and their bodies have amazing abilities to heal. Reboots that remain dead longer are stronger, and Wren is the most resilient reboot, having been dead 178 minutes. When a new batch of reboots comes into her facility for training, instead of choosing a reboot with a high number, as she usually does, she chooses Callum 22. Callum, having been dead a mere 22 minutes, is practically human. Part love story, part thriller, Reboot held my interest from start to finish. I am looking forward to the sequel, Rebel, which will be told from Callum’s point of view.

Article posted July 14, 2014 at 04:00 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 197



Article posted May 28, 2014 at 04:39 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 1195

Here is an excerpt from the starred review in Kirkus of this excellent work of historical fiction: Sarah Grimké was an actual early abolitionist and feminist whose upbringing in a slaveholding Southern family made her voice particularly controversial. Kidd re-imagines Sarah's life in tandem with that of a slave in the Grimké household. In 1803, 11-year-old Sarah receives a slave as her birthday present from her wealthy Charleston parents. Called Hetty by the whites, Handful is just what her name implies--sharp tongued and spirited. Precocious Sarah is horrified at the idea of owning a slave but is given no choice by her mother, a conventional Southern woman of her time who is not evil but accepts slavery (and the dehumanizing cruelties that go along with it) as a God-given right. Soon, Sarah and Handful have established a bond built on affection and guilt. Sarah breaks the law by secretly teaching Handful to read and write. When they are caught, Handful receives a lashing, while Sarah is banned from her father's library and all the books therein, her dream of becoming a lawyer dashed. As Sarah and Handful mature, their lives take separate courses. While Handful is physically imprisoned, she maintains her independent spirit, while Sarah has difficulty living her abstract values in her actual life. Eventually, she escapes to Philadelphia and becomes a Quaker, until the Quakers prove too conservative. As Sarah's activism gives her new freedom, Handful's life only becomes harder in the Grimké household. Through her mother, Handful gets to know Denmark Vesey, who dies as a martyr after attempting to organize a slave uprising. Sarah visits less and less often, but the bond between the two women continues until it is tested one last time. Kidd's portrait of white slave-owning Southerners is all the more harrowing for showing them as morally complicated, while she gives Handful the dignity of being not simply a victim, but a strong, imperfect woman.

Article posted May 28, 2014 at 04:39 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 1195



Article posted May 13, 2014 at 03:53 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 500

I was afraid this book was going to be a Fault in Our Stars wannabe, but I was pleasantly surprised. Be warned that Richie, the narrator, is a dying teen who doesn't mind talking about his urges and who uses very raunchy language to do so. His voice is utterly appropriate for a teen in his predicament, but not everyone will appreciate his smart mouth and rebellious spirit.

If you decide to give SUTHY a chance, and you get past Halloween night and you don’t want to keep reading, it is probably not the book for you. It may not be for everyone, but I was hooked by the determination of Richie and Sylvie to LIVE, in their own way, by their own rules, while they still can.

P.S. The author wrote this as a short story in 2009 before John Green wrote Fault in Our Stars. In an interview with School Library Journal, she says,” … the real origins of this book go back much farther, to the many times that I stayed with my son in Babies Hospital … in New York City. There, I met all sort of kids—sick, wounded, all hurt in some way. The ones who have always stayed in my mind—and my dreams—are the teenagers, who were both heartbreaking and hilarious. Full of wit and spirit and rebellion, even in the face of devastating illnesses. I’ve never forgotten their voices. That’s really where Richie and Sylvie came from.”

SYTHY contains mature subject matter and coarse language, and may not be deemed appropriate by all. As always, please adhere to your family’s values when choosing reading materials.

Article posted May 13, 2014 at 03:53 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 500



Article posted April 29, 2014 at 04:22 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 645





Fourteen year old Carey has lived with her mother in the middle of a national forest almost as long as she can remember. She has vague memories of the father her mother told her beat them, the man her mother claims she rescued her from. And yet, Carey and her beloved younger sister Jenessa have been alone in the camper in the woods for weeks with no heat or electricity and their meager food supplies are quickly dwindling. Soon a man shows up with a social worker, and Carey’s life is turned upside down. She can survive on almost nothing in the woods, but can she survive a “normal” family life and high school? What has become of Carey’s mother? Who is Jenessa’s father? Was Carey’s father really abusive? What happened on the “white-star night”? This tale of survival, family ties and dysfunction is a quick yet compelling read I would recommend to reluctant and avid readers alike.

Article posted April 29, 2014 at 04:22 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 645



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