Login
Copyright (c) 2016 by Julie Hooper Conditions of Use    Privacy Policy Return to Blogmeister
Julie Hooper -- Blogmeister


“The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you.”
― B.B. King

by Julie Hooper

Related Links
Nation Ford High School Media Center
Teacher Assignments
Teacher Entries
Show All
Student Entries
Show All

Article posted January 14, 2016 at 08:11 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 374



For those of you waiting and waiting and waiting for George R. R. Martin to finish the last book of the Song of Ice and Fire, here is a prequel set hundreds of years before The Game of Thrones. This beautifully illustrated book follows the escapades of Dunk (Sir Duncan the Tall) and Egg (Aegon Targaryn, Daenery’s great grandfather). Dunk was born in Flea Bottom in Kings Landing, never knowing his mother or father. He became a squire for a lesser knight and traveled with him around the Seven Kingdoms. Now Dunk is the Knight and Egg is his squire. A kinder, gentler story than any of the Song of Ice and Fire books, A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms fills in some of the backstory in that series, while being intriguing enough to stand on its own. The lovely illustrations by Gary Gianni add much to the book.

Article posted January 14, 2016 at 08:11 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 374



Article posted January 5, 2016 at 07:37 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 338


Families are supposed to shield children from the horrors of the world, but one Sunday nine-year-old Jess Hall watches as his autistic brother is called into a little church in the mountains of North Carolina. What happens next forces Jess to question everything he once believed. Clem Barefield, the local sheriff, arrives to find a group of charismatic believers who are unwilling to utter a word about the things Jess has seen. At the center of the mystery is Carson Chambliss, a snake handling ex-convict turned preacher whose past is just as mysterious as the power he claims to possess.

Told by three resonant and evocative characters—Jess; Adelaide Lyle, the town midwife and moral conscience; and Clem Barefield, A Land More Kind than Home is a literary thriller, thick with characters connected by faith, infidelity, addiction, and a sense of hope that is as tragic as it is unforgettable. These are masterful portrayals, written with assurance and truth, and they show us the extraordinary promise of this remarkable first novel. ~ from the publisher

Southern gothic at its finest. I devoured this disturbing and beautiful novel. ~ Ms. Hooper

Article posted January 5, 2016 at 07:37 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 338



Article posted January 5, 2016 at 06:48 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 42


This book … is the tale of an American astronaut stranded on Mars. He has to use his wits, plus a lot of duct tape and back-of-the-envelope calculations, to stay alive in an extremely hostile environment. It’s Robinson Crusoe in a space suit. ~ Joel Achenbach in this Washington Post article  

I loved The Martian . This book is the ultimate comeback to the question, “Why do I need to learn math and science?” ~ Ms. Hooper

Article posted January 5, 2016 at 06:48 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 42



Article posted January 5, 2016 at 04:20 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 51


I read Bone Gap in a single night. I didn’t intend to, I just couldn’t put it down. I maneuvered between four different positions on my couch, refusing to stop reading just because my neck hurt, or I had to “wake up in four hours.” When it was over, my eyes scanned the chairs and shelves of my living room trying to figure out what had moved, because I knew something was changed.

Laura Ruby’s Bone Gap opens on a Midwestern town where a girl — Roza — has been kidnapped, and a boy — Finn — is the only witness. Finn cannot successfully describe the kidnapper, so he places the blame of Roza’s disappearance on himself. We follow each of their perspectives, the mystery unfolding with a much larger cast of characters in the town. What seems to be a story of a kidnapping turns into something far more unusual, and ultimately becomes a moving meditation on seeing others and being seen.

Laura Ruby’s previous work includes novels for adults, teens, and children, running the spectrum of realism to fantasy. Bone Gap falls somewhere in the middle, reading the way a folk song sounds: timeless, mythical, and strange. ~ Tim Manley in the preface to his interview with the author

Just like Tim Manley, I read this book in a single night. It was beautiful, mysterious, frightening and magical. Highly recommended. Warning: contains mature content. ~ Ms. Hooper

Article posted January 5, 2016 at 04:20 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 51



Article posted December 21, 2015 at 03:15 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 920

An exhilarating and heart-wrenching love story about a girl who learns to live from a boy who intends to die.

Theodore Finch is fascinated by death. Every day he thinks of ways he might die, but every day he also searches for—and manages to find—something to keep him here, and alive, and awake.

Violet Markey lives for the future, counting the days until graduation, when she can escape her small Indiana town and her aching grief in the wake of her sister's death.

When Finch and Violet meet on the ledge of the bell tower at school—six stories above the ground—it's unclear who saves whom. And when the unlikely pair teams up on a class project to discover the "natural wonders" of their state, they go, as Finch says, where the road takes them: the grand, the small, the bizarre, the beautiful, the ugly, the surprising—just like life.

Soon it's only with Violet that Finch can be himself—a bold, funny, live-out-loud guy, who's not such a freak after all. And it's only with Finch that Violet forgets to count away the days and starts living them. But as Violet's world grows, Finch's begins to shrink.

This is a heart-wrenching, unflinching story of love shared, life lived, and two teens who find one another while standing on the edge. ~ Jennifer Niven



Article posted December 21, 2015 at 03:15 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 920



Article posted December 1, 2015 at 08:04 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 628

"Heartfelt and inspirational, Dumplin' will win readers over with her snarky humor and introspective view of growing up a big girl in a small town. You'll want her to take the cake, the crown, and the boy!" - Jen Bigheart, Westbank Community Libraries

Here are a few of Ms. Hooper's favorite Willowdean quotes:


“I hate seeing fat girls on TV or in movies, because the only way the world seems to be okay with putting a fat person on camera is if they’re miserable with themselves or if they’re the jolly best friend. Well, I’m neither of those things.”

“I like the idea of keeping my world in these little compartments where there is no risk of collision.”

“All my life I’ve had a body worth commenting on and if living in my skin has taught me anything it’s that if it’s not your body, it’s not yours to comment on.”

Article posted December 1, 2015 at 08:04 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 628



Article posted November 23, 2015 at 04:17 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 156

Article posted November 23, 2015 at 04:17 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 156



Article posted November 18, 2015 at 06:33 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 158

This book is a good, quick read on a subject we should all be discussing. Here’s the starred review it got in SLJ:



Rashad Butler is a quiet, artistic teen who hates ROTC but dutifully attends because father insists “there’s no better opportunity for a black boy in this country than to join the army.” He heads to Jerry’s corner store on a Friday night to buy chips, and ends up the victim of unwarranted arrest and police brutality: an event his white schoolmate Quinn Collins witnesses in terrified disbelief. Quinn is even more shocked because the cop is Paul Galluzzo, older brother of his best friend and Quinn’s mentor since his father died in Afghanistan. As events unfold, both boys are forced to confront the knowledge that racism in America has not disappeared and that change will not come unless they step forward. Reynolds and Kiely’s collaborative effort deftly explores the aftermath of police brutality, addressing the fear, confusion, and anger that affects entire communities. Diverse perspectives are presented in a manner that feels organic to the narrative, further emphasizing the tension created when privilege and racism cannot be ignored. Timely and powerful, this novel promises to have an impact long after the pages stop turning. VERDICT Great for fostering discussions about current events among teenage audiences. A must-have for all collections.Ashleigh Williams, School Library Journal

Article posted November 18, 2015 at 06:33 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 158



Article posted November 13, 2015 at 04:17 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 197

Loneliness and isolation can be as much a part of city life as the daily commute, certainly this is the case for Rachel, the protagonist of The Girl on the Train. Her fall from grace has been sudden, she has slipped bewilderingly quickly from happiness to despair. In her desperation to fill the space left by the life she once had, she feels herself to be forming a connection with a couple she sees from her train every day. These strangers have become so familiar to her that she feels as though she knows them, understands them; she constructs a whole narrative around them, she befriends them in her head. In fact, she has no clue about their real lives, so she has no idea what she is stumbling into when, having seen something out of the ordinary, something shocking, she makes the fateful decision to cross a line, from voyeur to active participant in their story. But once that line is crossed, she finds there’s no going back. ~ Paula Hawkins

Article posted November 13, 2015 at 04:17 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 197



Article posted November 13, 2015 at 03:45 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 100

An excellent and thought provoking read from one of our regional treasures, Ron Rash! Here’s the review from Kirkus:

Narrator Maggie Glenn works for a newspaper in Columbia, South Carolina. The 28-year-old photographer was born and raised in Tamassee, in the mountains to the west, and she’s assigned, along with star reporter Allen Hemphill, to cover a big story in her hometown. Three weeks earlier, 12-year-old Ruth Kowalsky had been sucked into a whirlpool in the Tamassee River; county divers have failed to dislodge her body from the rock where it lies trapped. Ruth’s father Herb, a powerful banker from Minnesota, wants to make the divers’ job easier by erecting a portable dam to divert the water flow. One problem: Erection means drilling holes into the bedrock, and federal law protects the river from any violation of its natural state. Storywriter and second-novelist Rash (One Foot in Eden, not reviewed) sets up a finely balanced confrontation between Luke Miller, fearless and incorruptible champion of the river (though no saint), and Ruth’s grieving parents, who want to give her a proper burial. Uncomfortably in the middle is the district ranger. Back in Tamassee, Maggie has more on her mind than her job. She has been estranged from her father ever since her brother Ben and she were badly burned in a childhood accident for which the old man was responsible. Now he’s dying of cancer. Can Maggie make peace with him, as her more forgiving brother did years ago? On the job, she takes a haunting photograph of the despondent Herb Kowalsky. Along with Hemphill’s reporting, it helps tip the balance in favor of the temporary dam. Luke, her ex-lover and mentor, is furious, and Maggie herself, secretly on his side, regrets taking it. But the suspense isn’t over. The river is rising. Will the dam hold long enough for the divers to retrieve the girl? ~ Kirkus Reviews



 

Article posted November 13, 2015 at 03:45 PM GMT0 • comment • Reads 100



Previous Entries All Entries       All Titles

My Classes & Students

Media Center Staff Reviews
Student Book Reviews

About the Blogger



What are all those people doing in the NaFo Media Center in the morning????



Locations of visitors to this page

Login
Copyright (c) 2016 by Julie Hooper Conditions of Use    Privacy Policy Return to Blogmeister