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Article posted May 22, 2008 at 08:15 PM GMT • comment • Reads 303

In 1662 King Charles granted a charter to Connecticut giving the colonists the rights to make their own laws (Speare, 70). 1787, King James wanted British Parliament to make laws for the colonists. Assemblies elected by the colonists made laws set taxes and raised companies of troops. Called militia to defend the colonists (Carter, 8).



In 1765, British Parliament could make more laws for the colonists. The King needed to pay for the French and Indian War so he made laws to tax the colonists (Harcourt, 266).



The King started the sugar act in 1764 (Harcourt, 272). “This tariff angered the colonists. But what bothered them the most was that they’d had no part in making this tax law” (Harcourt, 272). The King and Parliament all had a say in passing laws. “Unlike other British citizens, the colonists could not elect lawmakers … but Parliament was quick to remind colonists they were British subjects” (Harcourt, 263).



The Stamp Act was another blow to the colonists’ democratic ideals. The colonists had been practicing self- government for years (Harcourt, 263).



The Stamp Act of 1765 was another attempt by Parliament to get the colonists to pay the war debt. “The new tax law angered people in the colonies (January, 6). The Stamp Act required colonists to pay for a stamp (to show they paid the tax) on all paper goods like newspapers.



Parliament added these new laws to show they could still make laws for the colonists (Harcourt, 277). The Stamp Act Congress met to get the act repealed. Patriot James Otis said the famous quote, “No Taxation without Representation!” (Harcourt, 274). These British laws were directly against the democratic ideals of self-government the colonists had been practicing for 100 years.



The colonists did not get to elect representatives into British Parliament. They did not have any say in the tax laws they were being forced to pay. The King made a third law that angered the colonists, the tax on tea, 1773. The colonists believed in democracy (Harcourt, 263). The colonists were not represented in British Parliament and believed the only way to ensure their rights was to fight for them.



The colonists were British citizens living in America. When their rights were being trampled by The Sugar Act, The Stamp Act, and The Tax on Tea, they first appealed to the King and Parliament. When that didn’t work they protested. Eventually, the rally cry of “No taxation without representation” would lead the colonists to fight for their freedom. The colonists wanted a true representative government.



In 1776, in The Revolutionary War, British colonists fight Britain for the right to become American citizens and have freedom.



Refrences:



Carter, Alden. The American Revolution. New York: Franklin Watts, 1992.



Harcourt Brace. We The People; Early United States, Orlando: Harcourt Brace And company, 2000.



January, Brendan. The Revolutionary War. New York: Childrens press, 2000.



Maestro, Betsy. Liberty Or Death; The American Rrevolution-1763-1783.New York. Harper Collins Publishers, 2005.



Schanzer, Rosalyn. George vs. George; The American Revolution Seen From Both Sides. Washington D.C.: National Geographic, 2004.



Speare, Elizabeth George. The Witch of Blackbird Pond. New York: Bantam Doubleday Dell Publishers group Inc.,1958

From, Frodo









Article posted May 22, 2008 at 08:15 PM GMT • comment • Reads 303



Article posted May 22, 2008 at 09:48 PM GMT • comment • Reads 67

In 1662 King Charles granted a charter to Connecticut colony giving the colonist the rights to make their own laws (Speare, 70). Assemblies elected by the colonists make laws set tales, and raised companies of troops called military to defend the colonies (Carter, 8) 1687, King James wanted British parliament to make laws for the colonists (Speare, 70).



In 1765, british parliament could make laws for the colonists. The king needed to pay for the French and Indian war so he made laws to tax the colonists (Harcourt, 266)

The king started the sugar, act in 1764 (Harcourt, 272).



“This tariff angered the colonists. But what bothered them most was that they had had no part in making this tax law” (Harcourt, 272). The king and British parliament all had say in passing the laws. “Unlike other British citizens, the colonists could not elect law makers… but parliament was quick to remind colonists they were British subjects.” (Harcourt, 263)



The stamp act was another blow to the colonists democratic ideals. The colonists had been practicing self government, separate from the king for years (Harcourt, 263). They collected their own taxes to pay for services in the colonies (Carter, 8).



The stamp act of 1765 was another attempt by parliament to get the war dept. “The new tax laws angered the people in the colonies” (January,6). The stamp act required colonists to pay for a stamp (to show they paid the tax) On all paper goods like newspaper, mail, cards, normal paper.

“ Parliament added these new laws to show they could still make laws for the colonists” (Harcourt, 277). The stamp act congress met to get the act repealed. James Otis said the famous quote “No taxation without representation”(Harcourt, 274). These British laws were directly opposed to the self government. The colonists had been practicing for over 100 YEARS!

The colonists did not get to elect representatives into British parliament. “They did not have any say in the tax laws they were being forced to pay. The king made a third law that angered the colonists, the tax on tea, 1773. The colonists believed in democracy” (Harcourt, 263). The colonists were not represented in British parliament and believed the only way to ensure their rights was to fight for them. The colonists dressed up as Indians and went down to the water (Maestro, 7) to dump all the tea into the water to prove a point of there freedom.

The colonists were British citizens living in America. When their rights were being trampled by the sugar by the sugar act, the stamp act, and the tax on tea, they first appealed to the king and parliament. When that didn’t work they protested. Eventually the rally cry of “No taxation without representation.” “The congress sent an appeal for peace and Harmony to king George that parliament get rid of all the un-constitutional laws controlling America” (Schanzer, 27). Would lead the colonists to fight for their freedom. The colonists wanted a true represented government.

In 1776, in the revolutionary war, British colonists fight Britain for the right to become American citizens and be truly free.

Article posted May 22, 2008 at 09:48 PM GMT • comment • Reads 67



Article posted May 22, 2008 at 07:33 PM GMT • comment • Reads 72

No Taxation without Representation

By: Lemony

May 20 2008



In 1662 King Charles granted a charter to Connecticut Colony giving the colonists the rights to make their own laws (Speare, 70). Assemblies elected by the colonists made laws, set taxes, and raised companies of troops, called militia to defend the colonists (Carter, 8). In 1687, King James, wanted British Parliament to make laws for the colonists (Speare, 75).



In 1765, British Parliament could make laws for the colonists. The King needed to pay for the French and Indian War so he made laws to tax the colonists (Harcourt, 266).



The King started the Sugar Act in 1764 (Harcourt, 272). “This tariff angered colonists. But what bothered them most was that they had had no part in making this tax law” (Harcourt, 272). The King and Parliament all hade a say in passing laws. “Unlike other British citizens, the colonists could not elect lawmakers… but Parliament was quick to remind colonists they were British subjects” (Harcourt, 265)



The Stamp Act was another blow to the colonists’ democratic ideals. The colonists had been practicing self-government for years (Harcourt, 263). The Stamp Act of 1765 was another attempt by Parliament to get the colonists to help pay the war dept. “The Stamp Act required colonists to pay for a stamp (to show they paid the tax) or all paper goods like newspapers.



Parliament added these new laws to show they could still make laws for the colonists (Harcourt, 277). The Stamp Act Congress met to get the act repealed. Patriot James Odis said the famous quote, “No Taxation Without Representation!” (Harcourt, 274). These British laws were directly against the democratic ideals of self-government the colonists had been practicing for 100 yrs.



The colonists did not get to elect representation into British Parliament. They did not have any say in the tax laws they were being forced to pay. The King made a third law that angered the colonists, the tax on tea, 1773(Maestro, 7). The colonists believed in democracy (Harcourt, 263). The colonists were not represented in British Parliament and believed the only way to ensure their rights was to fight for them.



The colonists were British citizens living in America. When The Sugar Act, The Stamp Act, and The Tax on Tea were trampling their rights, they first appeared to the King and Parliament. When that didn’t work they protested. Eventually, the rally cry of “No Taxation without Representation” would lead the colonists to fight for their freedom. The colonists wanted a true representation government.



“The Congress sent an appeal for peace and harmony to King George and suggested that Parliament get rid of all the unconstitutional laws controlling America (Schanzer, 27). In 1776, in the Revolutionary War, British colonists fight Britain for the right to become American citizens and be truly free.



References

By: Lemony

May 20, 2008



Carter, Alden. The American Revolution. New York: Franklin Watts, 1992.



Harcourt, Brace. We The; Early United States. Orlando: Harcourt Brace and Company, 2000.



January, Brendan. The Revolutionary War. New York: Children’s Press, 2000.



Maestro, Betsy. Liberty or Death; The American Revolution 1763-1783. New York: HarperCollins Publishers, 2005.



Schanzer, Rosalyn. George vs. George: The American Revolution as seen from Both Sides. Washington D.C.: National Geographic, 2004.



Speare, Elizabeth George. The Witch of Blackbird Pond. New York: bantam Doubleday Dell Publishing Group, Inc. 1958.































Article posted May 22, 2008 at 07:33 PM GMT • comment • Reads 72



Article posted May 22, 2008 at 08:21 PM GMT • comment • Reads 64

Hey World,

this is my CBA an assignment.









British Taxes



By: Klaus

May 20 2008

IN 1662 king Charles granted a charter to conn. Colony giving the colonists the rights to make their own laws. (Speare, 70) Assemblies elected by the colonists made laws, set taxes, and raised companies of troops called militia to defend the colonies.(carter pg. 8)in 1687, king James wanted British wanted British parliament to make laws for the colonists.



IN 1765 British parliament could make laws for the colonists. The king needed to pay for the French and Indian war so he made laws to tax the colonists (Harcourt, 266)



The king started the sugar act in 1764 (Harcourt, 272) “This tariff angered colonists. But what bothered them the most was that they had no part in making this tax law” (Harcourt, 272) The king and parliament all had a say in passing law.” Unlike other British citizens, the colonists could not elect law makers…. but parliament was quick to remind colonists they were British subjects”(Harcourt, 263)



The stamp act of 1765 was another blow to the colonies democratic ideals. The new tax law angered the colonists” (January, 6) the people have been practicing self-government separate from the king, for years (Harcourt, 263) The stamp act made all people pay for a stamp on all paper like newspaper!



Parliament added these new laws to show they could still make laws for the colonists (Harcourt, 277) The stamp act congress met to get the act reapeled. Patriot James Otis said the famous quote. “No taxation without representation!” (Harcourt, 274) these British laws were directly against the democratic ideals of self-government the colonists had been practicing for 100 yrs.



The colonists did not get to elect representatives into British parliament. They did not have any say in the tax laws they were being forced to pay. The king made a third law that made people mad, the tax on tea, and 1773. The colonists believed in democracy (Harcourt, 263) the colonists believed the only way to assure their rights were to fight for them.



The people are British citizens living in America. There rights were being run over by the sugar act and the tax on tea. They first appealed to the king and parliament. When that did not work they protested. Eventually, the rally cry of “no taxation with out representation” would lead the colonists to fight for their freedom.



On December 16, 1773 a group called the sons of liberty dressed up as Mohawk Indians and went on the British boats and dumped all that tax tea into Britain harbor! When they were done the total amount was 1 million pounds! The congress sent a appeal for peace and harmony to king George and suggested that parliament get rid of all the unconstitutional laws controlling America.



Article posted May 22, 2008 at 08:21 PM GMT • comment • Reads 64



Article posted May 22, 2008 at 08:23 PM GMT • comment • Reads 135

Hey World,

This is my page of all the info for my story and authers.





REFERENCES

BY: Klaus

Carter, Alden. The American Revolution. New York: Franklin watts, 1992



Harcourt brace. We the people; The People; Early United States. Orlando: Harcourt Brace and company, 2000



January, Brendan. The Revolutionary war. New York: Children’s press, 2000.



Maestro, Betsy. Liberty or Death; The American Revolution 1763-1783. New York: HarperCollins Publishers, 2005.



Schanzer, Rosalyn. George vs. George; The American Revolution as seen from both sides. Washington D.C: National geographic, 2004.



Spear, Elizabeth George. The witch of blackbird pond. New York: Bantam Doubleday dell publishing group, Inc, 1958.

Article posted May 22, 2008 at 08:23 PM GMT • comment • Reads 135



Article posted May 22, 2008 at 07:35 PM GMT • comment (2) • Reads 90

No taxation without representation!

By

Annabeth





In 1662 King Charles granted a charter to Connecticut colony saying that the Connecticut colony could make their own laws (Spear, 70) Assemblies elected laws, bet taxes, and raised companions of troops called militia (charter, 8). Then in 1687 King James wanted the British Parliament to make laws for the colonists, therefore repelling the charter.



In 1765, British Parliament could make laws for the colonists. The king needed to pay for the French and Indian War. So he made laws to tax the colonists thus the sugar act (Harcourt, 266).

The sugar act, 1764. ”This tariff angered the colonists, but what bothered them most was they had no parting making this law (January 6).”The king and British parliament had all had a say in making this new law. Unlike other citizens colonists couldn’t elect lawmakers but parliament was quick to remind colonists they were still British subjects (Harcourt 263).



The stamp act, 1765. This was another big blow to the colonist’s democratic ideals. The colonists had been practicing self-government for a century (Harcourt 263).

They collected their own taxes to pay for service in all the colonies. As James Odis had said “ No taxation without representation” Parliament added these new laws to show they could still make laws for the colonists. (Harcourt 272) The stamp act congress met to get these British laws were directly opposed the democratic ideals of self-government they practiced for a century.





The colonists didn’t get to elect representative into the British parliament, Therefore, they didn’t get any say in the mater to what laws would be past and they were forced to pay for those laws. The tea act was the last straw. The King made a third law that angered the colonists.



The tea act, 1765. The colonists were so fed up with parliament passing completely unfair laws so they decide to protest. Parliament repelled all taxes except the tax on tea. On December 16, 1773 the colonists dressed as Indians and threw every last bag of British tea into the Boston harbor, which later came to be known as the Boston tea party. The colonists believed in democracy (Harcourt 263). Congress sent an appeal for peace and harmony to King George the third and suggested that parliament get rid of all unconstitutional laws controlling America (Schanzer 24). The colonists were not represented in British parliament and believed their rights as British citizens were being ignored.



The colonists were British citizens living in America.

When their rights were being trampled by, the sugar act, the tea act, and the stamp were trampling British citizens act the appealed to the King and British parliament. When that didn’t work they protested. Eventually, The rally call “No taxation without representation” turned into the Revolutionary War.





References

Carter, Alden. The American Revolution.

New York: Franklin Watt, 1992



Harcourt, Brace. We the people, Early United States.

Orlando, Florida: Harcourt brace and company, 2000



January, Brendan. The Revolutionary war.

New York: Children’s press, 2000



Maestro, Betsy. Liberty or Death; The American Revolution 1763-1783. New York. Harper Collins publishers, 2008



Schanzer, Rosalyn. George V.S George; The American Revolution as seen from both sides. Washington D.C.: National Geographic, 2004



Spear, Elizabeth George. The witch of black bird pond. New York: Bantam Doubleday Dell Publishing group inc, 1958





Article posted May 22, 2008 at 07:35 PM GMT • comment (2) • Reads 90



Article posted May 22, 2008 at 07:47 PM GMT • comment • Reads 90

“no Taxation without Representation”



By: Goldilocks



King Charles granted a charter to Connecticut colonies giving colonists the right to make our own laws (Speare, 70). Assemblies elected by the colonists made laws, set taxes, and raised companies of troops called militia to defend the colonies. (Carter,8). In 1687, King James wanted parliament to make laws for the colonists.(Speare,70). In 1765,parliament and the king could still make laws for colonists living in America. The King needed money to pay for the French and Indian War so he made laws for colonists (Harcourt, 266).



The king started the Sugar Act on 1764 (Harcourt, 272). “This tariff angered colonists. But what bothered them most was they had had no part in making this tax law.”(Harcourt, 272). The kind and British Parliament all had a say in the passing laws. Unlike other British citizens, the colonists could not elect lawmakers…but parliament was quick to remind colonists they were still British subjects (Harcourt, 263).



The stamp act was another blow to the colonists had been practicing self-government, separate from the king, for years (Harcourt, 263). They collected their own taxes to pay for services in the colonies. The stamp act of 1765 was another attempt by parliament to get the colonists to help pay the war debt. “The tax law angered people in the colonies.”(January, 6). The stamp act required colonists to pay for a stamp (to show that they pay the tax) on all paper like newspaper, mail, and letters for mail.



Parliament added theses new laws for the colonists (Harcourt, 277). The stamp act congress met to get the act repealed. Patriot James Otis said the famous words that changed history,” No taxation without representation!!” (Harcourt, 274). These British laws were directly against the democratic ideals of self-government the colonists had been practicing for 100 years.



The colonists did not get to elect representatives into British Parliament. They did not have any say in the tax laws they were forced to pay. The king made a third law that really angered the colonists, the tax on tea, 1773.



The colonists believed in democracy (Harcourt, 263). The colonists were not represented in British parliament and believed the only way to ensure their rights were to fight for themselves! The colonists were British citizens living in America. When their rights were being destroyed by the sugar act, stamp act, and the tax on tea, they appealed to the king and parliament. When that didn’t work they protested. “Congress sent an appeal for peace and harmony to king George that parliament all the unconstitutional laws controlling America.” (Schanzer, 27). Eventually, the rally cry of “no taxation without representation” would lead the colonists to fight for their freedom. The colonists wanted a true representative government.



In 1776, in the revolutionary war, British colonists fight Britain for their right to become American citizens and truly be FREE=http://





These are my refrences:



References



Carter, Alden. The American Revolution. New York: Franklin Watts, 1992.



Harcourt Brace. We the People; Early United States. Orlando: Harcourt Brace and company, 2000.



January, Brendan. The Revolutionary War. New York: Children’s press, 2000.



Maestro, Betsey. Liberty Or Death; The American Revolution 1763-1783. New York: Harper Collins Publishers, 2005



Schanzer, Rosalyn. George vs. George: The American Revolution as seen from both sides. Washington D.C: Notional Geographic, 2000.



Spear , Elizabeth George. The Witch of Blackbird Pond. New York: Bantam Doubleday Dell Publishing Group,Inc, 1958.



Sincerely,

Goldilocks :)











Article posted May 22, 2008 at 07:47 PM GMT • comment • Reads 90



Article posted May 22, 2008 at 08:14 PM GMT • comment • Reads 69

Tyranny In the colonies A story of the Revolution

By Legolas





“In 1662 King Charles granted a charter to Connecticut colony giving the colonists the rights to make their own lows. (Spear pg70) In 1687 King James Wanted Parliament to make lows for the colonists. Assemblies elected by the colonists made lows, set taxes and raised companies of troops called militia to deafened the colony. (Carter Pg,8)”





“In 1765 British parliament could make lows for the colonists. The king needed money to pay of the French and Indian war debt. So he made lows to tax the colonists. (Harcourt pg 226)”



“The king started The sugar act in 1764 (Harcourt pg272)” this tariff angered the colonists but the thing that bothered them more than any thing was that they had no say in the new law”. (Harcourt pg,272) The King and British parliament and the British citizens all had a say in the passing of new British laws. Un like the British citizens the colonists could not elect law makers… But Parliament was fast at pouting the colonists in their place. (Harcourt pg,263)



“The stamp act was another blow to the colonists Democratic ideals. The colonists had been practicing self- government, separate from the king for 100 years (p.263) “They collected their taxes to pay for services in the colonies.”

(January,6) the stamp act had colonists pay for a stamp that showed they had paid the tax for what ever paper they had peachiest such as books, paper, playing cards, and newspaper.



The King and parliament added these new laws to show they were still the boss of the colonists.

(Harcourt pg 277) The stamp act congress met to get the Act repealed. Things got better but Then King George III dropped the bomb. The dreaded tea act. Tyranny ran threw the minds of many. No taxation without representation were the famous words spoken by patriot James odes.

(Harcourt pg,224) Thus came



“The colonists did not get to elect representatives in British parliament, there fore they did not have any say in the new tax laws that they were being forest to pay. The tea act of 1765, was the last straw. The congress sent an appeal to King George III suggesting parliament get rid of all the unconstitutional laws controlling America.



Tyranny ran throw the minds of many.

No taxation without representation were the famous words spoken by patriot James Odis. ( Harcourt ,pg224) Thus came the Boston tea party were patriots known as the sons of liberty disguised as Indians so no one would know who they were threw all the tea over the side of the ship it was stored on. All the tea leaves turned the water the color of the tea.



2 years later on the Lexington green the first shot of the revolution the first shot of a new nation was the shot that would ignite a long and bloody war the would cost thousands of lives and last tell 1781 in Yorktown.





references

1 Carter,Alden.The American Revolution.

2 Harcourt Brace. We the people;The American Revolution 1763 1783.

3January,Brendon. The revolutionary war.

4Mastro,Betsy. liberty or death;The American Revolution.

5Schanzer,Rosalyn.George vs George;The American Revolution as seen by both sides.

6 Speare,Elizabeth George. The witch of black bird pond.

Article posted May 22, 2008 at 08:14 PM GMT • comment • Reads 69



Article posted May 22, 2008 at 09:31 PM GMT • comment (2) • Reads 2625

No Taxation without Representation

By: JustJoking

May 20 2008



In 1662 King Charles granted a charter to Connecticut Colony giving the colonists the rights to make their own laws (Speare, 70). Assemblies elected by the colonists made laws, set taxes, and raised companies of troops, called militia to defend the colonists (Carter, 8). In 1687, King James, wanted British Parliament to make laws for the colonists (Speare, 75).



In 1765, British Parliament could make laws for the colonists. The King needed to pay for the French and Indian War so he made laws to tax the colonists (Harcourt, 266).



The King started the Sugar Act in 1764 (Harcourt, 272). “This tariff angered colonists. But what bothered them most was that they had had no part in making this tax law” (Harcourt, 272). The King and Parliament all hade a say in passing laws. “Unlike other British citizens, the colonists could not elect lawmakers… but Parliament was quick to remind colonists they were British subjects” (Harcourt, 265)



The Stamp Act was another blow to the colonists’ democratic ideals. The colonists had been practicing self-government for years (Harcourt, 263). The Stamp Act of 1765 was another attempt by Parliament to get the colonists to help pay the war dept. “The Stamp Act required colonists to pay for a stamp (to show they paid the tax) or all paper goods like newspapers.



Parliament added these new laws to show they could still make laws for the colonists (Harcourt, 277). The Stamp Act Congress met to get the act repealed. Patriot James Odis said the famous quote, “No Taxation Without Representation!” (Harcourt, 274). These British laws were directly against the democratic ideals of self-government the colonists had been practicing for 100 yrs.



The colonists did not get to elect representation into British Parliament. They did not have any say in the tax laws they were being forced to pay. The King made a third law that angered the colonists, the tax on tea, 1773(Maestro, 7). The colonists believed in democracy (Harcourt, 263). The colonists were not represented in British Parliament and believed the only way to ensure their rights was to fight for them.



The colonists were British citizens living in America. When The Sugar Act, The Stamp Act, and The Tax on Tea were trampling their rights, they first appeared to the King and Parliament. When that didn’t work they protested. Eventually, the rally cry of “No Taxation without Representation” would lead the colonists to fight for their freedom. The colonists wanted a true representation government.



“The Congress sent an appeal for peace and harmony to King George and suggested that Parliament get rid of all the unconstitutional laws controlling America (Schanzer, 27). In 1776, in the Revolutionary War, British colonists fight Britain for the right to become American citizens and be truly free.





References

By: JustJoking

May 20, 2008



Carter, Alden. The American Revolution. New York: Franklin Watts, 1992.



Harcourt, Brace. We The; Early United States. Orlando: Harcourt Brace and Company, 2000.



January, Brendan. The Revolutionary War. New York: Children’s Press, 2000.



Maestro, Betsy. Liberty or Death; The American Revolution 1763-1783. New York: HarperCollins Publishers, 2005.



Schanzer, Rosalyn. George vs. George: The American Revolution as seen from Both Sides. Washington D.C.: National Geographic, 2004.



Speare, Elizabeth George. The Witch of Blackbird Pond. New York: bantam Doubleday Dell Publishing Group, Inc. 1958.

Article posted May 22, 2008 at 09:31 PM GMT • comment (2) • Reads 2625



Article posted May 22, 2008 at 08:25 PM GMT • comment • Reads 67

“Taxation without Representation!”

By: AmericanGirl



In 1662 King Charles granted a charter to Connecticut colony giving the colonist the rights to make their own laws (Speare, 70). Assemblies elected by the colonists make laws set tales, and raised companies of troops called militia to defend the colonies (Carter, 8) 1687, King James wanted British parliament to make laws for the colonists (Speare, 70).



In 1765, British parliament could make laws for the colonists. The king needed to pay for the French and Indian war so he made laws to tax the colonists (Harcourt, 266)

The king started the sugar, act in 1764 (Harcourt, 272).



“This tariff angered the colonists. But what bothered them most was that they had had no part in making this tax law” (Harcourt, 272). The king and British parliament all had say in passing the laws. “Unlike other British citizens, the colonists could not elect law makers… but parliament was quick to remind colonists they were British subjects.” (Harcourt, 263)



The stamp act was another blow to the colonists democratic ideals. The colonists had been practicing self-government, separate from the king for years (Harcourt, 263). They collected their own taxes to pay for services in the colonies (Carter, 8).



The stamp act of 1765 was another attempt by parliament to get the war dept. “The new tax laws angered the people in the colonies” (January,6). The stamp act required colonists to pay for a stamp (to show they paid the tax) On all paper goods like newspaper, mail, cards, and normal paper.

“ Parliament added these new laws to show they could still make laws for the colonists” (Harcourt, 277). The stamp act congress met to get the act repealed. James Otis said the famous quote “No taxation without representation”(Harcourt, 274). These British laws were directly opposed to the self-government. The colonists had been practicing for over 100 YEARS!

The colonists did not get to elect representatives into British parliament. “They did not have any say in the tax laws they were being forced to pay. The king made a third law that angered the colonists, the tax on tea, 1773. The colonists believed in democracy” (Harcourt, 263). The colonists were not represented in British parliament and believed the only way to ensure their rights were to fight for them. The colonists dressed up as Indians and went down to the water (Maestro, 7) to dump all the tea into the water to prove a point of there freedom.

The colonists were British citizens living in America. When the British was trampling their rights by the sugar act, the stamp act, and the tax on tea, they first appealed to the king and parliament. When that didn’t work they protested. Eventually the rally cry of “No taxation without representation.” “The congress sent an appeal for peace and Harmony to king George that parliament get rid of all the un-constitutional laws controlling America” (Schanzer, 27). Would lead the colonists to fight for their freedom. The colonists wanted a true represented government.



In 1773, The Tax On Tea, leads to the Boston Tea Party. The colonists threw all of the tea in the Harbor. The colonists were tired of taxes. They put their foot down and got ready. They disguised themselves as Indians so they wouldn’t get caught as they were throwing the tea into the Harbor. (Maestro, 7) But the King won’t be happy when he here’s the news. But the colonists want to send a message, that the want to be free.



In 1776, in the revolutionary war, British colonists fight Britain for the right to become American citizens and be truly free.







References:

By: AmericanGirl



Carter, Alden. “The American Revolution.”

New York: Franklin Watts, 1992.



Harcourt Brace. “We The People; Early United States.”

Orlando: Harcourt Brace and Company, 2000.



January, Brendan. “The Revolutionary War.”

New York: Children’s Press, 2000.



Maestro, Betsy. “Liberty or Death; The American Revolution 1763-1783.” New York: HarperCollins Publishers, 2005.



Schanzer, Rosalyn. “George vs. George; The American Revolution as seen from Both Sides.” Washington D.C.: National Geographic, 2000.



Speare, Elizabeth George. “The Witch of Blackbird Pond.” New York: Bantam Doubleday Dell Publishing Group, Inc, 1958.



















Article posted May 22, 2008 at 08:25 PM GMT • comment • Reads 67



Article posted May 23, 2008 at 10:11 PM GMT • comment • Reads 77

No Taxation without Representation

By: Countolaf

May 20 2008



In 1662 King Charles granted a charter to Connecticut Colony giving the colonists the rights to make their own laws (Speare, 70). Assemblies elected by the colonists made laws, set taxes, and raised companies of troops, called militia to defend the colonists (Carter, 8). In 1687, King James, wanted British Parliament to make laws for the colonists (Speare, 75).



In 1765, British Parliament could make laws for the colonists. The King needed to pay for the French and Indian War so he made laws to tax the colonists (Harcourt, 266).



The King started the Sugar Act in 1764 (Harcourt, 272). “This tariff angered colonists. But what bothered them most was that they had had no part in making this tax law” (Harcourt, 272). The King and Parliament all hade a say in passing laws. “Unlike other British citizens, the colonists could not elect lawmakers… but Parliament was quick to remind colonists they were British subjects” (Harcourt, 265)



The Stamp Act was another blow to the colonists’ democratic ideals. The colonists had been practicing self-government for years (Harcourt, 263). The Stamp Act of 1765 was another attempt by Parliament to get the colonists to help pay the war dept. “The Stamp Act required colonists to pay for a stamp (to show they paid the tax) or all paper goods like newspapers.



Parliament added these new laws to show they could still make laws for the colonists (Harcourt, 277). The Stamp Act Congress met to get the act repealed. Patriot James Odis said the famous quote, “No Taxation Without Representation!” (Harcourt, 274). These British laws were directly against the democratic ideals of self-government the colonists had been practicing for 100 yrs.



The colonists did not get to elect representation into British Parliament. They did not have any say in the tax laws they were being forced to pay. The King made a third law that angered the colonists, the tax on tea, 1773(Maestro, 7). The colonists believed in democracy (Harcourt, 263). The colonists were not represented in British Parliament and believed the only way to ensure their rights was to fight for them.



The colonists were British citizens living in America. When The Sugar Act, The Stamp Act, and The Tax on Tea were trampling their rights, they first appeared to the King and Parliament. When that didn’t work they protested. Eventually, the rally cry of “No Taxation without Representation” would lead the colonists to fight for their freedom. The colonists wanted a true representation government.



“The Congress sent an appeal for peace and harmony to King George and suggested that Parliament get rid of all the unconstitutional laws controlling America (Schanzer, 27). In 1776, in the Revolutionary War, British colonists fight Britain for the right to become American citizens and be truly free.



References

By: Countolaf

May 20, 2008



Carter, Alden. The American Revolution. New York: Franklin Watts, 1992.



Harcourt, Brace. We The; Early United States. Orlando: Harcourt Brace and Company, 2000.



January, Brendan. The Revolutionary War. New York: Children’s Press, 2000.



Maestro, Betsy. Liberty or Death; The American Revolution 1763-1783. New York: HarperCollins Publishers, 2005.



Schanzer, Rosalyn. George vs. George: The American Revolution as seen from Both Sides. Washington D.C.: National Geographic, 2004.



Speare, Elizabeth George. The Witch of Blackbird Pond. New York: bantam Doubleday Dell Publishing Group, Inc. 1958.



















Article posted May 23, 2008 at 10:11 PM GMT • comment • Reads 77



Article posted May 22, 2008 at 08:06 PM GMT • comment • Reads 82

THIS IS MY STORY TIPE THING UH YEAH HERE YOU GO!



Kyo



In 1662 King Charles granted a charter to Connecticut 25yrs ago, king James none to take the colonists charter. Electing members represented the king and British parliament, all had a say had a passing of British law even British citizens living in Britain were represented by electing members of parliament.



In 1764, British parliament could make laws for colonists, the king needed to pay for the French and Indian wars so he made laws to tax the colonists.

The king started the sugar act in 1764 this angered the colonists, but what bothered them most was that they had no part in making this tax law the king and British parliament all had a say in passing laws. Unlike other British citizens would not elect lawmakers



The stamp act was another blow to the colonists to metric deals the colonists had been practicing self-government for years.



The stamp act of 1765 was another attempt by parliament to get the colonists to pay for the war the new tax law angered people in the colonists.



The stamp act required colonists to pay the stamp on all paper goods like newspaper.



Parliament added these new laws for the colonists the stamp act congress met to get the act reaped. James otis said the quote,

“No Taxation Without Representation”.

These British laws were directly against the demonstration ideals of self-government the colonists have been practicing for 100yrs.



The colonists did not get to elect representation into British parliament. They did not have any say in the tax laws they were being forced to pay. The king king made a third law that angered the colonists, the tax on tea in, 1773, the colonists believed in democracy the colonists weren’t represented in British parliament and believed the only way ensure there right’s was to fight for them.



The colonists were British citizens living in America. When there right’s were being trampled by the sugar act, the stamp act, and the tax on tea, they first appealed to the king and parliament. When that didn’t work they protested. Eventually the real cry of no taxation without representation government.



In 1776 in the revolutionary war, British colonists fight Britain for the right to become American citizens and be truly FREE!.



AND THAT'S MY STORY TIPE THINY.......... STAY IN SCHOOL!



Article posted May 22, 2008 at 08:06 PM GMT • comment • Reads 82



Article posted May 22, 2008 at 07:53 PM GMT • comment • Reads 79

TAXES

By. Smeagol





In 1662 king Charles granted a charter to Connecticut colonies giving the colonist the rights to make laws their own. (Spear 70) Assemblies elected by the colonists made laws, set taxes, and raised companies of troops called militia to defend the colonies. (Charter, 8) In 1687, King James wanted British parliament to make laws for the colonists. (Spear, 70)





In 1765 British parliament and the king were still able to make laws for the colonists. The king needed to pay for the French and Indian war so he made laws to tax the colonists. (Harcourt 266)





The king started the sugar act in 1764 (Harcourt 272) “This tariff angered the colonists. But what bothered them most was they had no part in making this tax law.”(Harcourt, 272) The king and British parliament had a say in passing laws. Unlike other British citizens the colonist could not elect lawmakers… but parliament was quick to remind the colonists they were British subjects. (Harcourt)



The stamp act was another blow to the colonist’s democratic ideals. The colonists had bean-practicing self-government for years.



The stamp act of 1765 was another attempt by parliament to get to get the colonist to pay for the war debt (January 6) to get stamps on paper products was what was required (to show they paid a tax).



Parliament added these new laws to show they could still make laws for the colonist. (Harcourt, 277). The stamp act congress met to get the act repelled, James Otis then said the famous quote “NO taxation without representation.” (Harcourt 224). These laws were directly against the ideas of self-government the colonist had bean practicing for 100 year.



The colonist did not get to elect representatives into British parliament. They were not given any say into the tax laws they were forced to pay. The king made a third law that angered the colonist the tax on tea.1773, the colonist believed in democracy (Harcourt, 263) the colonist were not represented in British parliament and believed the only way to ensure their rights was to fight.



The colonist were British citizens living in America their rights were being trampled by taxes such as the sugar act the stamp act and the tea act. First they appealed to the king when that didn’t work the protested. Eventually the cry of no taxation without representation would lead to a fight for freedom.



Congress sent an appeal for peace and harmony. (Schanzer) In 1776 in the revolutionary war British colonists fight Britain to become American citizens and be truly free.















REFERENCES

Carter, Alden. The American Revolution. New York: Franklin Watts, 1992



Harcourt, Brace. We the; early united states. Orlando: Harcourt brace and company, 2000.



January, Brendan. The revolutionary war. New York: Children’s press, 2000



Maestro Betsy. Liberty or death; The American Revolution 1763-1783. New York: Harper Collins publishers, 2005



Schanzer, Rosalyn. George vs. George: The American Revolution as seen from both sides. Washington D.C. national geographic, 2004.



Spear Elizabeth George. The Witch Of Blackbird Pond. New York: Bantom Doubleday publishing group, inc. 1958.

Article posted May 22, 2008 at 07:53 PM GMT • comment • Reads 79



Article posted May 22, 2008 at 07:54 PM GMT • comment • Reads 205

Revolutionary Taxes



By: Roxas



In 1662 King James promised us the Connecticut Charter (Spear, 70). This would have let us make our own laws.



In 1763 King George needed the colonists to pay for its French and Indian War, so they taxed the colonists with extra taxes or ‘acts’ here are some of them.



One, in 1765 the Sugar Act was passed. This was when Parliament (British Government) put tax on all British sugar. This angered the colonists, but they are still far away from rabble because they think it is fair.



Two, in 1765 the Stamp Act was passed. This was when Parliament put tax on paper such as: envelopes, newspaper, and even receipts! One man named James Otis yelled the famous words “No taxation without representation!” (Harcourt, 274) This got the colonists on the brink of unwanted rebellion!



Finally, in 1773 the worst act was passed- the Tea Act! “This new tax law angered the colonists” (January 6.) Back then tea was as important as modern-day parents and coffee! Finally the patriots (but not the loyalists) got so mad (and that was a lot of merchants because no one would buy their tea) preformed what would later be called the Boston Tea Party. They dressed up as Indians (Maestro) and threw the tea into Boston harbor (lucky fishes!)



In 1774 delegates from all 13 colonies met in Philadelphia for the first ever continental congress (Schanzer.)



Finally all this added up to war, in 1775, the first battles were in Lexington and Concord. The war lasted for 10 years and finally ended in 1785.





References

Carter, Alden. The American Revolution New York: Franklin Watts, 1992



Harcourt, Brace. We the People; Early United States. Orlando: Harcourt Brace and Company. 2000



January, Brnan. The American Revolutionary War. New York; Children’s Press, 2000



Maestro, Betsie. Liberty or Death: The American Revolution 1763-1783. New York: Harpfor Collins Publisher2005



Schanzer, Rosalyn. George VS. George; The American Revolution as seeen from both sides Washington D.C.; National Geographic, 2004



Spear, Elisabeth George. The Witch of Blackbird Pond. New York: Bantam Doubelday Dell Publishing Group, Inc, 1958





Article posted May 22, 2008 at 07:54 PM GMT • comment • Reads 205



Article posted May 22, 2008 at 07:39 PM GMT • comment • Reads 66

“Taxation without Representation!”

By:Taryn



In 1662 King Charles granted a charter to Connecticut colony giving the colonist the rights to make their own laws (Speare, 70). Assemblies elected by the colonists make laws set tales, and raised companies of troops called military to defend the colonies (Carter, 8) 1687, King James wanted British parliament to make laws for the colonists (Speare, 70).



In 1765, british parliament could make laws for the colonists. The king needed to pay for the French and Indian war so he made laws to tax the colonists (Harcourt, 266)

The king started the sugar, act in 1764 (Harcourt, 272).



“This tariff angered the colonists. But what bothered them most was that they had had no part in making this tax law” (Harcourt, 272). The king and British parliament all had say in passing the laws. “Unlike other British citizens, the colonists could not elect law makers… but parliament was quick to remind colonists they were British subjects.” (Harcourt, 263)



The stamp act was another blow to the colonists democratic ideals. The colonists had been practicing self government, separate from the king for years (Harcourt, 263). They collected their own taxes to pay for services in the colonies (Carter, 8).



The stamp act of 1765 was another attempt by parliament to get the war dept. “The new tax laws angered the people in the colonies” (January,6). The stamp act required colonists to pay for a stamp (to show they paid the tax) On all paper goods like newspaper, mail, cards, normal paper.

“ Parliament added these new laws to show they could still make laws for the colonists” (Harcourt, 277). The stamp act congress met to get the act repealed. James Otis said the famous quote “No taxation without representation”(Harcourt, 274). These British laws were directly opposed to the self government. The colonists had been practicing for over 100 YEARS!

The colonists did not get to elect representatives into British parliament. “They did not have any say in the tax laws they were being forced to pay. The king made a third law that angered the colonists, the tax on tea, 1773. The colonists believed in democracy” (Harcourt, 263). The colonists were not represented in British parliament and believed the only way to ensure their rights was to fight for them. The colonists dressed up as Indians and went down to the water (Maestro, 7) to dump all the tea into the water to prove a point of there freedom.

The colonists were British citizens living in America. When their rights were being trampled by the sugar by the sugar act, the stamp act, and the tax on tea, they first appealed to the king and parliament. When that didn’t work they protested. Eventually the rally cry of “No taxation without representation.” “The congress sent an appeal for peace and Harmony to king George that parliament get rid of all the un-constitutional laws controlling America” (Schanzer, 27). Would lead the colonists to fight for their freedom. The colonists wanted a true represented government.

In 1776, in the revolutionary war, British colonists fight Britain for the right to become American citizens and be truly free.





References

References

By: Taryn



Carter, Alden. “The American Revolution.”

New York: Franklin Watts, 1992.



Harcourt Brace. “We The People; Early United States.”

Orlando: Harcourt Brace and Company, 2000.



January, Brendan. “The Revolutionary War.”

New York: Children’s Press, 2000.



Maestro, Betsy. “Liberty or Death; The American Revolution 1763-1783.” New York: HarperCollins Publishers, 2005.



Schanzer, Rosalyn. “George vs. George; The American Revolution as seen from Both Sides.” Washington D.C.: National Geographic, 2000.



Speare, Elizabeth George. “The Witch of Blackbird Pond.” New York: Bantam Doubleday Dell Publishing Group, Inc, 1958.





~tArYn~

Article posted May 22, 2008 at 07:39 PM GMT • comment • Reads 66



Article posted May 23, 2008 at 06:00 AM GMT • comment • Reads 93

Here is essay that I wrote.



No Taxation Without Representation!

Colonists live under the rule of the King

By Sabrina



In the year 1667, King Charles granted a charter to the Connecticut colony allowing the colonists the right to make their own laws. (Speare 70). Assemblies elected by the colonists made laws, set taxes and raised companies of troops called militia to defend the colonies. (Charter, 8). In 1687, King James wanted the British Parliament to be able to make laws for the colonists, or in other words take away the charter. (Speare, 70).

In 1764, British Parliament could make laws for the colonists. The King needed money to pay for the militia that protected the colonies in the French and Indian war. He decided to make the colonies pay for some of the money needed. (Harcourt, 226).

The King started taxes with the Sugar Act in 1764. (Harcourt, 272). “This tariff angered the colonists but what bothered them most is that they had no part in making this new law”. The King and British Parliament all had a say in passing laws. “Unlike other British citizens, the colonists could not elect lawmakers… but parliament was quick to remind colonists they were still British subjects.” (Harcourt, 263).

The Stamp Act was another blow to the colonists’ democratic ideas. The colonists had been practicing self-government, separate from the king, for years. They collected their own taxes to pay for taxes to pay for services in the colonies. The Congress sent an appeal for peace and harmony to King George and suggested that parliament get rid of all the unconstitutional laws controlling America. (Schanzer, 27) The Stamp Act of 1765 was another attempt by the parliament to get the colonists for help pay the war dept. “The new tax law angered the people in the colonies”. (January, 6). The Stamp Act was made as a tax on everything that was paper that you could purchase. Things like newspapers had to have a special stamp on it so people know that a tax had been paid for it. Parliament added these new laws to show they could still make laws for the colonists. (Harcourt, 277). The Stamp Act congress met to discuss the new law. It was there Patriot James Otis recited the famous line “No Taxation Without Representation”. These British laws were directly against the democratic ideas the colonists had been practicing for 100 years.

The colonists did not get to elect representatives into British Parliament. They did not have any say in the laws they were being forced to live by. Parliament decided to make one last tax; the tax on tea in 1773. “Parliament canceled all the taxes except the tax on tea”. (Maestro, 7). The colonists were fed up with all the taxes and not being represented a British citizens. On one late night in December, Patriots called The Sons of Liberty dressed as Mohawk Indians and raided a ship that held British tea. They split all the tea boxes and threw them into the harbor. The event came to be known as the Boston Tea Party. The so-called Boston Tea Party infuriated King George and Parliament. He blockaded Boston Harbor not allowing any ships with merchandise to come in or out as a punishment. The colonists wanted to be free of King George’s rule.

The colonists were British citizens living in America. Their rights were being trampled by all the taxes and laws they had no say in. They protested and soon the cry of “No Taxation Without Representation” could be heard all around the colonies.

In 1776, in the Revolutionary War, the Continental Army or the colonists made history in the war against Britain. They were truly free.

Article posted May 23, 2008 at 06:00 AM GMT • comment • Reads 93



Article posted May 22, 2008 at 07:39 PM GMT • comment • Reads 52

Here is the referance list that I used in my essay.





Reference List



Carter, Alden. The American Revolution. New York: Franklin Watts, 1992



Harcourt Brace. We the People; Early United States. Orlando: Harcourt Brace and Company, 2000



January, Brendan. The Revolutionary War. New York. Children’s Press, 2000



Maestro, Betsy. Liberty or Death; The American Revolution 1763-1783 New York, HarperCollins Publishers, 2005



Schanzer, Rosalyn. George vs. George; The American Revolution as seen from Both Sides. Washington D.C.; National Geographic, 2004



Speare, Elizabeth George. The Witch of Blackbird Pond. New York: Bantom DoubleDay Dell Publishing Group, Ink, 1958





Article posted May 22, 2008 at 07:39 PM GMT • comment • Reads 52



Article posted May 22, 2008 at 07:58 PM GMT • comment (3) • Reads 113

Here is my 5 paragraph essay on the evnts that led up to the Revolutionary War.



British Taxes on Colonists

By Eragon

After the French and Indian War in the (17 50’s to 1763) The King of England Desperately needed money to pay his army to make the Colonies safe (Harcourt,263), The King had already taxed the citizens of England enough so he decided to tax the Colonies. The Colonists agreed to this deal but were still a little angry (January, 7); who knew at this little tax could help start a war.



This tariff or tax law was later known as the Sugar Act because it taxed all of the goods like sugar, flour, molasses and other and other foods from the British trade. Most colonies had a charter that granted them able to make their own laws and have Militia to guard them (Speare,70) King and Parliament could still make the laws. The Colonists were mad but what made them furious was that they had no say in British Parliament or what King James was able to tax.







The Sugar was lifted but then a tax called tee Stamp Act. The Stamp Act taxed all things l made of paper so newspapers, playing cards even books had to be taxed. A special stamp was given to show that this person had paid the tax. The colonists were furious but still people said it was fine and that we owe the King for keeping us safe from the French And The Indians. People made fun of the stamp by making a phony of it with a skull and cross bones. Later in the year James Otis said the famous quote that was a rally cry fro colonists everywhere

“No Taxation without representation”

Now all of Boston Will buy no paper. Then The Stamp Act congress came around and protested against the law so finally the repealed the tariff and things were fine until March 5th 1770



In 1770 British Troops occupied the town of Boston and lived in people houses fro free! Then on March 5th 1770 Things got ugly. A group of colonists were harassing British Soldiers and throwing nasty slush balls with rocks in them when then the soldiers panicked and opened fire on the group.

5 Colonists were killed, it later was known as The Boston Massacre. This event brought the Colonists to declaring war on England.



In 1773 all the taxes had stopped but the one on tea. Tea was like coffee and people drank it allot because water was really dirty back then so a Group called The Sons Of Liberty on December 16th 1773 the colonial group disguised them self’s as Mohawk Indians and boarded 3 ships in the Boston Harbor (Maestro, 6) and dumped all the tea, but nothing else was harmed, but hen all the tea was dumped, the total cost of 1 Million Pounds! That was the last straw for the British, in 1774 they closed Boston Harbor and brought mo0re troops and people HAD to give them shelter! This was also the last straw for the colonists, the made the Continental Congress which had delegates from all 13 colonies and they met in Philadelphia and so then to discuss what to do about the British. (Shanzer)



So in 1775 it was war. So that is my 5 Paragraph essay of the events that led up to The Revolutionary War It took America 8 years for independence, but in 1782 the Treaty of Paris was Signed and the war was over. (Carter)











References



Carter, Alden. The American Revolution. New York: Franklin Watts, 1992.



Harcourt Brace. We The People; Early United States, Orlando: Harcourt Brace And company, 2000.



January, Brendan. The Revolutionary War. New York: Childrens press, 2000.



Maestro, Betsy. Liberty Or Death; The American Rrevolution-1763-1783.New York. Harper Collins Publishers, 2005.



Schanzer, Rosalyn. George vs. George; The American Revolution Seen From Both Sides. Washington D.C.: National Geographic, 2004.



Speare, Elizabeth George. The Witch of Blackbird Pond. New York: Bantam Doubleday Dell Publishers group Inc.,1958









Simcerely,

Eragon



Article posted May 22, 2008 at 07:58 PM GMT • comment (3) • Reads 113



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