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In order for a buoyant force to be great enough to make an object float, does the object need to be less dense than water? If you think that yes, an object does have to be less dense than water to float, then how does a metal ship float? Explain that. How does a concrete boat float (remember the video we saw.) Please explain your answer by leaving me a comment.


(For those of you not from Chimacum who wish to add an answer or challenge something you read here are some of the resources we used: Density and Buoyancy Links.)

Article posted February 11, 2009 at 09:13 AM • comment (35) • Reads 90 • Return to Blog List
 
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The object would have to be less dense the the water, otherwise the object would sink. Metal ships can float because they are less dense than the water and it would need to be either the same or less than the weight of however much water it displaces, to allow it to float.
Posted May 1, 2009 at 01:15 PM by • Morgan N
Posted May 1, 2009 at 01:15 PM by • Morgan N
the object would definitely have to be less dense otherwise it would sink.
and a metal ship can float because they are less dense than the enitre ocean.
Posted May 1, 2009 at 01:14 PM by • maureen c
Posted May 1, 2009 at 01:14 PM by • maureen c
Hello,
This is not a comment for posting but I didn't know how else to contact you. Thank you for responding to Stargirl about her insensitive comment to one of your students. I hope you understand why I will not post your comment on her blog, as it is not appropriate there, either. I will , however, share it with her before deleting. Please contact me personally should you find anymore comments like this. This is how many other teachers and I deal with teaching our students how to comment more appropriately. It will also allow us to communicate. Last year, I had to send a similar message to another teacher and we started a blog buddy system with commenting. It was most beneficial. Perhaps, we can do something similar.
Thank you.
Lisa Parisi
South Paris Collaborative
collaborative@herricks.org
Posted April 24, 2009 at 07:42 PM by • Lisa Parisi
Posted April 24, 2009 at 07:42 PM by • Lisa Parisi
yes it has to be less dense then water. for an objectlike a metal or concrete boat to float it needs to weigh the same or less then the amount of the water it displaces
Posted March 18, 2009 at 01:10 PM by • cole
Posted March 18, 2009 at 01:10 PM by • cole
When something is more dense than water, it is negativly buoyant.
Posted March 16, 2009 at 09:24 PM by • erinb